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Vertere Acoustics launches Tempo, a new generation 'digital' turntable motor drive

Vertere Acoustics launches Tempo digital turntable motor drive
(Image credit: Vertere)

Vertere has begun shipping its new digital turntable motor drive, Tempo.

Tempo's purpose is to control the record player's motor and provide a smoother drive with lower noise and lower distortion. Like the company's reference motor drive, from which it derives, Tempo uses an internal microprocessor to produce digital sine and cosine waves that are converted into an analogue signal by the onboard DAC. The waveforms are amplified using two bridged amplifiers to power the motor.

Connection to the record player is via a 7-pin motor link at the rear and the front panel features a mode/speed selector providing three programmable options, allowing for easy switching between 33 and 45rpm.

Vertere says that its careful choice of components – including a gold-plated PCB, four fully regulated voltage rails powering different circuit sections, and finally Pulse-R drive cables and a separate D-Fi LED power cable – ensure a ‘cleaner’ delivery of power to the motor, helping to reduce noise and distortion.

To keep the components isolated from interference, the entire digital, microprocessor and DAC circuitry is shielded twice, first by copper foil and then the whole PCB using stainless steel.

Vertere expects the Tempo to be used with its SG-1 and RG-1 Turntables, hoping that MG-1 customers will migrate towards it over time. "It is pretty surprising how much of an improvement Tempo delivers, given that the SG motor drive already gives superbly clean power. Vertere confidently suggests a listening test," says the firm's press release.

The Vertere Tempo is available now for £2850 ($3995/€3598, about AU$5500).

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Mary is a staff writer at What Hi-Fi? and has over a decade of experience working as a sound engineer mixing live events, music and theatre.