Best Bluetooth turntables 2024: wireless record players tested by our experts

Vinyl is undoubtedly still popular, but so are wireless headphones. So what if you want to combine these two elements – one incredibly physical and tangible, the other relying on wireless streams? The answer is a Bluetooth turntable. 

When buying a new record player, you might want to consider the rising need for compatibility with modern products like wireless headphones and speakers, especially if you don't want to go down the traditional hi-fi separates route. And the inclusion of Bluetooth in a turntable is proving increasingly popular for its sheer convenience.

The best Bluetooth record players deliver great vinyl sound from your deck to a pair of compatible Bluetooth speakers (such as the Sonos Era 100) or headphones (such as the Sony WH-1000XM5), making listening to records – and building your vinyl system – easier than ever. These decks also come with a phono stage built-in, so you can create a neat vinyl system that doesn't involve multiple boxes.

That doesn't mean these wireless decks are only for beginners and casual listeners, though, as this curated list features talented turntables ranging from affordable to more expensive models. We've tested every single one of these Bluetooth record players in our dedicated listening rooms with a variety of music and partnering kit – you can read more about how we test turntables and what to consider when choosing the best Bluetooth turntable for you. 

Read on for our recommendations and advice so you can be sure your record collection is in safe hands. If you're not 100 per cent invested in needing Bluetooth, you can also check our wider best record player guide as well.

The quick list

Kashfia Kabir
Kashfia Kabir

I am the Hi-Fi and Audio Editor of What Hi-Fi? and have tested dozens of turntables of all types and budgets during my decade's worth of reviewing experience. The best turntables – regardless of Bluetooth connectivity or extra features – still need to sound great for the money you're spending on them, so while the convenience of Bluetooth streaming is great, the overall sound quality is a deciding factor when picking the best Bluetooth turntables. Turntables are highly sensitive to vibrations and anything that's less than well made will result in poor performance. For Bluetooth turntables, how swiftly and easily they pair with your wireless headphones and/or speakers is a big factor, too. I've tested and listened to every Bluetooth record player listed below, so I'm confident you'll find the right deck to enjoy your beloved vinyl records on.

Best budget turntable

A fully automatic deck with oodles of character.

Specifications

Type: Belt drive
Operation: Fully automatic
Speeds: 33 ⅓, 45
Speed change: Electronic
Cartridge: Moving magnet
Phono stage: Yes
Bluetooth: Yes (SBC, aptX)
USB: No
Dimensions (hwd): 10.8 x 43 x 36.7cm
Weight: 3.5kg
Finishes: 1 (black)

Reasons to buy

+
Entertaining sound
+
Easy to use
+
Plug-and-play

Reasons to avoid

-
Purist alternatives sound better

Not only does this budget Sony Bluetooth turntable leave you with little to do during set-up – just attach the belt to the platter – it does pretty much everything but shaking the vinyl from its sleeve, too.

This Sony is a fully automatic deck – this means you don't have to manually move the tonearm at the start or end of a record playing. It's 'plug and play’ use makes it ideal for vinyl novices, and helpfully includes a phono stage and Bluetooth streaming. With all those features, it's astonishing that this Sony deck continues to be priced at the more affordable end of the turntable market. It could only score more highly for usability if it somehow took the LPs from their covers. 

You can pair the PS-LX310BT with up to eight Bluetooth devices and, in our tests using headphones, the connection was strong enough to walk into another room, close the door and even go outside.

What's more, it sounds ridiculously fun. More traditional decks, such as the Award-winning Rega Planar 1, can be more mature in their performance, but when you consider this fully automatic Bluetooth record player's list of features, it's hard to believe it can sound this good with such a price tag.

Read the full Sony PS-LX310BT review

Best mid-price turntable

A stylish, fuss-free deck that's decked with fine features and fine sound.

Specifications

Type: Belt drive
Operation: Manual
Speeds: 33 ⅓, 45
Speed change: Electronic
Cartridge: AT-VM95E moving magnet
Phono stage: Yes
Bluetooth: Yes (SBC)
USB: No
Dimensions (hwd): 12.6 x 42 x 34cm
Weight: 5.5kg
Finishes: 1 (rosewood)

Reasons to buy

+
Smooth, detailed, easy-going sound
+
Lovely build and finish
+
Easy to use after initial set-up

Reasons to avoid

-
Sound can be bettered by purist rivals
-
Bluetooth pairing can be temperamental

In the AT-LPW50BTRW, Audio Technica has delivered a good-looking, enjoyable-sounding Bluetooth record player that’s great to use. It's a step above the budget Sony deck in price, design and performance. Combining a belt drive design with a gorgeous rosewood finish and build quality that exudes quality and style, this turntable goes a step further with a built-in switchable phono stage that makes using it with active speakers or as part of your hi-fi system a doddle.

Connecting with wireless speakers or Bluetooth headphones can be a bit tricky if there are other Bluetooth devices turned on in the same room (the turntable tries to connect to those too), but once the connection is made it's steady, stable and sounds decent, too. If all you have is a Sonos speaker (such as the Era 100) to connect the AT-LPW50BTRW to, it forms a neat, compact system for your vinyl collection – we can see the appeal.

But play it through a proper hi-fi set-up, and the deck's talents are more obvious. It's smooth-sounding, has ample detail to deliver the texture of instruments and nuance to voices, and has a great sense of punch and rhythm. Alternatives like the Rega Planar 1 Plus at a similar price (which has a phono stage built in, but no Bluetooth) have the edge with a greater level of subtle expression and dynamics, better precision and attack, but there's no denying Audio Technica's easy-going approach is appealing. If your heart is set on a Bluetooth turntable, this is the best compromise of them all.

Read the full Audio Technica AT-LPW50BTRW review

Top Tip
Kashfia Kabir
Top Tip
Kashfia Kabir

The pairing process with Bluetooth turntables can be a little tricky. There's no app or menu to specifically select the Bluetooth headphone or speaker you're trying to connect to, which means the turntable is effectively looking at all the available devices it can connect to. If there are other products with Bluetooth in your room, you'll want to turn them off during the pairing process, so the turntable has a better chance of connecting to only the product you want it to.

Best turntable system

An Award-winning turntable system that you simply need to add speakers to.

Specifications

Type: Belt drive
Operation: Manual
Speeds: 33 ⅓, 45
Speed change: Manual
Cartridge: Ortofon OM 5E moving magnet
Phono stage: Yes
Bluetooth: Yes (SBC)
USB: No
Dimensions (hwd): 11.8 x 41.5 x 33.5cm
Weight: 5kg
Finishes: 2 (red, white, black)

Reasons to buy

+
True just-add-speakers convenience
+
Capable, even-handed sound
+
Good range of features

Reasons to avoid

-
Some will hanker after more power
-
Baffling remote control

The Pro-Ject Juke Box E is based on Pro-Ject’s well-regarded Primary turntable and is tricked out with an Ortofon OM 5E cartridge, built-in amplification (25W per channel into 8 ohms) and a Bluetooth receiver. It's an all-in-one turntable package – all you need to do is add a pair of speakers or headphones and you're good to go.

Right from the off, this is recognisably a Pro-Ject turntable. It carries the brand’s sonic signature as surely as some sports brands carry three stripes. In essence, that sonic signature is one of easy-going fidelity – the Juke Box E establishes a decently spacious soundstage and positions instruments upon it securely in their own space even as they integrate and interact together. It’s untroubled by even tricky tempos or odd rhythms, has reasonable shine and brilliance at the top end, and its midrange reproduction is detailed. 

It’s an all-in-one Bluetooth record player system that demands very few compromises, given its price. It’s an all-in-one system that offers a viable alternative to a traditional separates system, and one we can easily recommend. The Juke Box E delivers convenience and backs it up with Award-winning sound quality. You can't really ask for more than that.

Read the full Pro-Ject Juke Box E review

Best premium turntable

Premium-quality wireless deck that sounds good and looks even better.

Specifications

Type: Direct drive
Operation: Manual
Speeds: 33 ⅓, 45
Speed change: Electronic
Cartridge: Alva MC moving coil
Bluetooth: Yes (aptX HD, aptX, SBC)
Phono stage: Yes
USB: No
Dimensions (hwd): 13.9 x 43.5 x 36.8cm
Weight: 10.9kg
Finishes: 1 (Lunar Grey)

Reasons to buy

+
Smooth, easy-going listen
+
Classy build quality

Reasons to avoid

-
Purist designs sound more expressive and entertaining
-
Bluetooth operation is erratic
-
Expensive

Cambridge Audio’s Alva TT V2 is the second generation to the original (and appealing) Alva TT wireless turntable, and is a relatively safe but well-thought-out evolution.

The same features that made the initial model so appealing are back for the sequel, including the direct drive design, aptX HD Bluetooth streaming to compatible headphones/speakers, electric speed change and a built-in phono stage, but there are a few tweaks added to the mix. The TT V2 sports a new tonearm with a detachable headshell, and you can now toggle the built-in phono stage and the Bluetooth module on and off. These helpful options make it easier to change the cartridge when required for an upgrade, as well as give you the option to use an outboard phono stage (or the one in your amp), should you prefer. 

While Bluetooth streaming is convenient to have, we do encounter some erratic connection issues during our testing, when paired with wireless headphones such as the Apple AirPods Max and Mark Levinson No. 5909. Those issues aside, it’s a likeable deck to use and listen to. The TT V2 isn’t a thrill machine when it comes to sound, opting instead for a smooth, full-bodied audio delivery. Similar-priced rivals will give you a better sense of rhythmic drive and dynamics, especially from more purist options like the Rega Planar 6/Ania turntable. But the rich tone, detailed sound and convincing musical cohesiveness give us plenty to like about this Cambridge Audio Bluetooth record player.

Read the full Cambridge Audio Alva TT V2 review

Also consider

JBL Spinner BT: Despite not being the last word in outright musicality, the JBL Spinner will appeal to anyone who just needs a simple, easy to use deck to get their records playing with the minimum of fuss. With an open, expansive sound and support for Bluetooth 5.2 and aptX HD, it's certainly worth considering.  

How to choose a Bluetooth turntable

As with any new purchase, you need to decide on your budget. When it comes to buying a source like a Bluetooth turntable, we'd suggest limiting your budget to around a quarter of your system's cost if it's being added to an existing hi-fi set-up with speakers and an amplifier. With that in mind, make sure you read up on the sonic characteristics of all your components – not all five-star products sound best with put together; they all benefit from the right partnering.

If you're only planning on using the Bluetooth turntable with a wireless Bluetooth speaker or wireless active speakers or pair of wireless headphones, then you don't need to spend a fortune. The better the quality of the wireless speaker/headphone, the better the quality you'll hear of your vinyl streamed over Bluetooth.

Luckily, in this case, you won't need any extra cables, either, and can be flexible with placing them anywhere in the room. Just make sure you have a stable, level surface to place your Bluetooth turntable on with minimal vibrations affecting it and overall sound quality.

Once you've decided on your budget, decide on the features you require besides Bluetooth. Belt drive or direct drive motor? Does it have a phono stage built in? If your heart is set on a Bluetooth turntable, they should all come with an integrated phono stage, and it will make connecting to a wireless speaker or active speakers even easier, as it negates the need for a separate amplifier.

Do you prefer manual or automatic operation? Take note of the Bluetooth codecs it supports as well – does that codec match with your partnering speakers and headphones? As a rule, all Bluetooth turntables should support SBC as standard, but AAC is compatible with Apple kit, while aptX/aptX HD and LDAC codecs will offer higher-quality streams over Bluetooth. Make sure you have a checklist based on your needs to help you narrow the search to your ideal turntable.

How we test Bluetooth turntables

The What Hi-Fi? team has more than 100 years of collective experience in reviewing, testing and writing about consumer electronics – and that includes Bluetooth record players. We have dedicated and acoustically treated testing facilities in London and Reading, and we have a team of experienced reviewers who conduct all our in-house product testing.

We test Bluetooth turntables just as we would any standard turntable – taking the time to set them up correctly on a level surface. We ensure we spend plenty of time using and listening to each turntable, noting how easy or difficult it is to use as well as testing any extra features they have, including automatic operation, aptX codec Bluetooth quality or USB recording. As part of our testing process, we use both our reference and price-appropriate amplifiers, phono stages and speakers to hear how the turntables sound with different kit, so we can give better buying advice. We also listen to a variety of music genres on records, too.

With Bluetooth turntables, we also test the Bluetooth connection and quality with some of our favourite compatible wireless speakers and Bluetooth headphones at relevant price points, to gauge how they sound when streaming vinyl. If there are any difficulties with pairing or connection dropouts, we'll note this in the review as well.

All new Bluetooth turntables are tested in comparison with our favourite five-star, best-in-class turntables at the same price range, where possible. All of our review verdicts are agreed upon by the team as a whole instead of a single reviewer. This ensures that we achieve consistency across all our reviews and that we avoid individual bias, thus continuing our reputation for delivering trusted, independent reviews for nearly five decades. We have no input from PRs or commercial departments, which is why our reviews and star ratings are trusted by customers and manufacturers alike.

From all of our reviews, we choose the top Bluetooth record players to feature in this Best Buy. That's why if you take the plunge and buy one of the products recommended here, or on any other Best Buy page, you can rest assured you're getting a What Hi-Fi?-approved product.

You can read more about how we test and review products on What Hi-Fi? here.

FAQ

Is it worth getting a Bluetooth turntable?

If you love the physical tactility of vinyl but also need the convenience of Bluetooth streaming with no wires, then buying a Bluetooth turntable is worth considering. 

There might be many reasons why you may not be able to play your vinyl records on your turntable at full blast – you may want to listen to music at night, or you don't want to disturb your housemates or neighbours with your constant death metal/Taylor Swift/Pink Floyd records. Connecting to Bluetooth headphones so you can listen to your vinyl in peace, without wires, and without disturbing others is an appealing choice for many. You may also simply enjoy the freedom that a wireless connection gives you to move around in your room or house.

Similarly, suppose you don't have the space or funds to invest in a full hi-fi system with traditional passive speakers, or don't particularly care about having a separates system. In that case, all you need is a good pair of active speakers with Bluetooth (the KEF LSX II LT or Ruark MR1 Mk2, for instance) or Bluetooth speakers (e.g. Sonos Era 100) which have amplification built into them already. Then you can connect your Bluetooth turntable to this wireless speaker (which can come in many different designs and don't need to be put on stands) for a flexible, wire-free set-up that can be placed anywhere in your home.

How does a Bluetooth turntable work?

You put on a record and play it just like any other standard turntable. Unlike purist turntable designs, a Bluetooth record player will always have a phono stage built in, so you can plug it into any amplifier or active speaker directly.

For the Bluetooth connection, you'll have to press on the Bluetooth pairing button on the turntable, ensure that the wireless headphone or wireless speaker you want to use is also in pairing mode, and wait for them to connect. The instructions on each turntable might vary, but most recommend placing the headphones/speaker close to the turntable to ensure it pairs to the right product. 

Do Bluetooth turntable sound good?

That depends on the quality of construction of the turntable itself, the tonearm and cartridge used, and the Bluetooth headphones/speakers you're connecting it to. Purist turntable designs, such as the Rega Planar 3 or Pro-Ject Debut Pro, prioritise audio fidelity and don't have additional features such as phono stage and Bluetooth built in. These turntables tend to deliver a purer, more accurate and more "hi-fi" sound quality. Bluetooth turntables can sound detailed, entertaining and musical – as the five-star Sony PS-LX310BT in this list shows – but the added electronics and features introduce noise and interference that can impact the audio signal.

When streaming over Bluetooth, the quality of sound entirely depends on the headphones or speaker you're using. A great-sounding pair of wireless headphones such as the Sony WH-1000XM5 or B&W Px7 S2e are ideal. If the turntable features a higher-quality codec like aptX, then make sure the headphones or speaker are compatible with this codec too to get the benefit of better-quality streams.

Recent updates

  • February 2024: Updated our testing process and added FAQ section to help buyers with the most asked questions.
  • October 2023: Scores in-depth sections added to each entry to give more insight into how we rate the sound, build quality and features of each Bluetooth turntable.
  • April 2023: Added Audio Technica AT-LPW50BTRW entry following four-star review.

MORE:

Building your record collection? 10 tips for buying second-hand vinyl

Discover 10 of the best vinyl subscription services for record collectors

Check out 13 of the weirdest turntables ever made

From voice to vinyl: how records get their groove

How to choose the right record player for you

Kashfia Kabir
Hi-Fi and Audio Editor

Kashfia is the Hi-Fi and Audio Editor of What Hi-Fi? and first joined the brand over 10 years ago. During her time in the consumer tech industry, she has reviewed hundreds of products (including speakers, amplifiers and headphones), been to countless trade shows across the world and fallen in love with hi-fi kit much bigger than her. In her spare time, Kash can be found tending to an ever-growing houseplant collection and shooing her cat Jolene away from spinning records.

With contributions from
  • Millersville
    What Hi-Fi? said:
    Whether you're after a budget Bluetooth record player or a just-add-speakers system, we have you covered.

    Best Bluetooth record players: budget to premium plate spinners : Read more
    Which Bluetooth turntables do you recommend for playing 78 rpm records?
    Reply
  • ukray2022
    Absolutely right! I have a sizeable collection of classical orchestral, opera box sets and choral works on 78's. Some of the greatest performers in classical music and opera and many live performances
    I wonder who is pushing all this new tech?
    It seems that every time a research lab brings out a new method of broadcast/reception and the selling of music, it's claimed the public go mad to buy the new system.
    Well if the pie chart published at the start of this article is even fairly accurate it seems those claims are rubbish.
    I buy a lot of music on Presto and some of the great recordings are now unavailable on CD. For me to convert to a new system would cost me a bomb, and with Amazon raising prices steeply the warning is clear, become a customer of such a system may leave you their prisoner having to pay increases whenever it suits these tax dodging corporations.
    Reply
  • nopiano
    ukray2022 said:
    Absolutely right! I have a sizeable collection of classical orchestral, opera box sets and choral works on 78's. Some of the greatest performers in classical music and opera and many live performances
    I wonder who is pushing all this new tech?
    It seems that every time a research lab brings out a new method of broadcast/reception and the selling of music, it's claimed the public go mad to buy the new system.
    Well if the pie chart published at the start of this article is even fairly accurate it seems those claims are rubbish.
    I buy a lot of music on Presto and some of the great recordings are now unavailable on CD. For me to convert to a new system would cost me a bomb, and with Amazon raising prices steeply the warning is clear, become a customer of such a system may leave you their prisoner having to pay increases whenever it suits these tax dodging corporations.
    I’m not sure why you’d want Bluetooth if you’re a 78 collector. You need a hefty turntable with a special 78 large radius stylus.

    Bluetooth is for the iPhone generation, handy in cars, and for playing from your phone to a speaker. But you knew that, didn’t you?
    Reply
  • DREADZONE
    Is there a niche listening environment for turntable playing vinyl VIA BLUETOOTH that I am unaware of? Surely the degradation of sound quality via bluetooth will "undo" all the goodness and pure sound of vinyl?
    Reply
  • westsound
    I wonder if this is for folks who think low resolution mp3s sound good?
    Reply