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BRISTOL SHOW 2012: Pioneer network players support AirPlay and 192kHz/24-bit audio

Pioneer N50

Pioneer's new N30 and N50 network audio players are on display here at Bristol, and you can watch our video report on them here.

They support Apple AirPlay for wireless music streaming, and can play high-resolution 192kHz/24-bit music files.

Available in the UK now for £350 and £500 respectively, both players were developed to access music from a PC, NAS drive, hard-disk, Apple iDevice or USB, as well as internet radio stations.

Equipped with DLNA 1.5 certiifcation, the Pioneer N30 and N50 support playback of high-resolution WAV and FLAC files, as well as MP3 and MPEG4 AAC compressed audio.

The aluminium front includes a 2.4in QVGA colour display and control buttons on the right side to maintain the players' 'minimalist' looks.

Watch our video report from the Bristol Show

For optimum audio performance, each player is fitted with a high-accuracy master clock to minimise time-axis errors.

A front-mounted USB port enables charging and playback of any iPod, iPhone or iPad as well as PC files saved on a USB device.

In addition, the N50 gets an asynchronous USB DAC, allowing direct USB connection with a PC or laptop without having to access a home network.

Other N50 enhancements include auto level control, Pioneer's Sound Retriever technology to improve the sound quality of compressed music formats, and Hi-bit 32 audio processing.

Options available on the N30 and N50 include Pioneer's free iControl App, a Bluetooth adapter and a wireless LAN converter.

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Andy Clough

Andy is Global Brand Director of What Hi-Fi? and has been a technology journalist for 30 years. During that time he has covered everything from VHS and Betamax, MiniDisc and DCC to CDi, Laserdisc and 3D TV, and any number of other formats that have come and gone. He loves nothing better than a good old format war. Andy edited several hi-fi and home cinema magazines before relaunching whathifi.com in 2008 and helping turn it into the global success it is today. When not listening to music or watching TV, he spends far too much of his time reading about cars he can't afford to buy.