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Best computer speakers 2022: upgrade your desktop audio

Best computer speakers Buying Guide: Welcome to What Hi-Fi?'s round-up of the best desktop speakers you can buy in 2022.

If you want music to sound good in your home office or a spare room, a pair of neat desktop stereo speakers to flank your laptop/computer or sit on a shelf could well be the answer.

The best computer speakers will blast out your Tidal or Spotify playlists, YouTube videos and Zoom calls much more capably than your laptop's built-in speakers – and they won't take up too much room in the process.

How to choose the best computer speakers for you

When it comes to purchasing a pair of speakers for your laptop/computer desktop system, size will no doubt be a factor in your buying decision. All of the pairs of computer speakers below are inherently from the more compact end of the speaker market and better suited to being perched on a desk than the majority of stereo speakers. Only have room for a one-box unit? You should check out our best Bluetooth speakers guide instead.

But it isn't only size that matters; one of the invariable beauties of having speakers within your workspace is that they can connect easily to your phone or laptop. Some of the computer speakers below can connect over Bluetooth so you needn't worry about unsightly cables trailing all over your desk space, while others require connecting over, say, USB via a cable. Some even support wi-fi and have network streaming smarts integrated.

What all of the products below have in common is their ability to deliver good all-round performance to earn a worthy place on our best computer speakers list.

Best computer speakers: Q Acoustics M20

Q Acoustics M20 delivers a versatile, great-sounding desktop system for an affordable price. (Image credit: Q Acoustics)
Q Acoustics more than achieves its aims with this desktop system

Specifications

Bluetooth: aptX HD, aptX Low Latency
Inputs: USB Type B, optical, RCA, 3.5mm
Outputs: Subwoofer
Dimensions (hwd): 27.9 x 17 x 29.6cm

Reasons to buy

+
Insightful and spacious sound
+
Unfussy on placement
+
Great connectivity

Reasons to avoid

-
Probably too big for a laptop system
-
No wireless network streaming

The Q Acoustics M20 are a pair of powered speakers designed to work wherever you feel like putting them. They have a lot of useful connections on the back – TVs, CD players, turntables and laptops can also be wired to the M20 through optical, RCA line-level, aux and USB Type B connections. And there's wireless Bluetooth streaming, too. One speaker in the pair is the mains-powered 'master' and feeds the other through a supplied piece of speaker cable.

Versatile, simple to use and nicely put together – crucially, they also sound the part. The M20 speakers sound full, loud, spacious and energetic. For affordable speakers that pack in so much, we're impressed how refined and detailed they manage to sound.

Q Acoustics has made an unfussy, just-add-source set of powered speakers that we find impossible to dislike. With all of the amplification squirrelled away in the master speaker and the plethora of connectivity and placement options covered, the M20 is far more likely to become your entire music system than it is simply your new desktop speakers – and for this money, you’ll be hard pushed to better the sound quality with hi-fi separates. 

Read the full Q Acoustics M20 review

Best desktop computer speakers: Ruark Audio MR1 Mk2

The perfect combination of size and sound, these Ruarks are the ideal desktop speakers.
The Mk2 are great desktop computer speakers for the money.

Specifications

Bluetooth: aptX
Inputs: Optical, 3.5mm
Outputs: Subwoofer
Dimensions (hwd): 17 x 13 x 13.5cm

Reasons to buy

+
Stunningly musical sound
+
Subtle dynamics
+
Stylish, compact design

Reasons to avoid

-
No USB input

Gorgeous looks, streamlined design and features, sound quality that’s been improved in every way – the Ruark MR1 Mk2 are multi-What Hi-Fi? Award winners that deservedly feature high on this list.

You can connect over Bluetooth, optical or 3.5mm – easily and quickly – and hi-res audio is supported all the way up to 24-bit/192kHz. The step-up in performance from the original MR1 model is impressive, making the Mk2 even more appealing than before.

The Ruark MR1 Mk2 are lovely to listen to, but their stylish retro looks are a huge part of the charm too. The handcrafted wooden cabinets are beautifully made, the speakers are good to use, and they’re the perfect petite size to fit onto a bookshelf, TV stand or desk.

Quite simply, these are superb speakers of their type.

Read the full review: Ruark Audio MR1 Mk2

Best computer systems: KEF LSX II

A terrific, feature-packed, premium system from KEF that looks and sounds fantastic. (Image credit: KEF)
A fantastic, multi-talented streaming system perfect for smaller rooms

Specifications

Bluetooth: Yes
Inputs: HDMI ARC, USB-C, optical, Ethernet
Outputs: Subwoofer
Radio: Internet
Wi-fi streaming: Yes
Dimensions (hwd): 24 x 15.5 x 18cm

Reasons to buy

+
Well-rounded sonic performance
+
Excellent imaging and dynamics
+
HDMI and USB-C inputs

Reasons to avoid

-
Native 24-bit/192kHz playback requires wired connection
-
Best suited to smaller rooms or desktop use

For the all-new LSX II, KEF has taken what was already a winning formula (the LSX were What Hi-Fi? Award winners) and elevated it. It introduced some key upgrades that improve user experience by adding more modern connectivity and updating the companion app, and, without really altering the speaker hardware, has produced a talented set-up that sings with any genre of music sent its way.

The KEF LSX II is a compact and stylish all-in-one streaming system that comes with none of the baggage and extra boxes that a separates set up brings. Not to mention the extra cost: it may seem pricey, but an equivalent separates system would cost far more for the kind of performance LSX II delivers.

If you have a smaller room or want speakers that will flank your desktop, the LSX II will happily oblige with a clear, musical sound and a fine sense of rhythm that has us tapping a foot or finger along to whatever we play through them. They're fantastic. Nothing else really comes close at this level.

Read the full KEF LSX II review

Best desktop computer speakers: Klipsch The Fives

Use it with your laptop, TV or turntable – these Klipsch speakers are worth considering. (Image credit: Klipsch)
A one-stop shop for home audio

Specifications

Bluetooth: 5.0
Inputs: RCA, phono, 3.5mm, optical, USB, HDMI ARC
Outputs: Subwoofer
Dimensions (hwd): 30.5 x 16.5 x 23.5cm

Reasons to buy

+
Punchy presentation
+
Good features set
+
Versatile nature

Reasons to avoid

-
Uneven tonality
-
Not the most organised presentation

Klipsch describes The Fives as a ‘powered speaker system’. They can be used as a hi-fi system – either standalone or with a source plugged in – as desktop speakers, or indeed as a true stereo alternative to a soundbar thanks to the inclusion of an HDMI ARC connection. Thanks to RCA, 3.5mm aux, digital optical and USB inputs, plus wireless Bluetooth 5.0, they will connect to pretty much anything. They even have a built-in phono stage for hooking up a turntable that doesn't have one itself.

Yes, they're relatively expensive compared to the Ruark and Q Acoustics listed here, but sonically they offer good detail, plenty of punch and decent stereo imaging – even if they don't sound as organised or tonally balanced as we'd like. A step up on a computer, soundbar or wireless speaker for sure, and much more convenient than a complete separates system.

Read the full review: Klipsch The Fives

Best computer speakers: Steljes Audio NS3

Affordable, appealing and available in several colours, these are a great budget desktop option.
Versatile, affordable and an affable listen, these are solid desktop computer speakers.

Specifications

Bluetooth: Yes
Inputs: Optical, 3.5mm, RCA
Outputs: Subwoofer
Dimensions (hwd): 21 x 14 x 19cm

Reasons to buy

+
Sleek design
+
Good connectivity
+
Powerful bass

Reasons to avoid

-
Could be more cohesive
-
Need a bit more detail

For a desktop solution, the compact and affordable NS3 speakers certainly play their part well. They’re capable enough to work as your everyday speakers, and will look suitably stylish while doing it (not least as they come in seven colours).

You can use the NS3’s optical input to connect a television or plug your analogue music sources into the 3.5mm socket. There’s even a stereo RCA connection for other hi-fi kit. And for wireless connectivity, there's Bluetooth. Unfortunately, the USB socket is only for charging other devices – not for audio playback.

They may not be the most transparent offerings out there, but they're neat and well-appointed wireless speakers with solid bass. If you’re looking for an entry-level way to get your workplace audio sounding better, these speakers are worth considering.

Read the full review: Steljes Audio NS3

Best computer speakers: Acoustic Energy AE1 Active

One of the best desktop speakers for pure performance. (Image credit: Acoustic Energy)
High-end performance without the need for a stack of high-end electronics.

Specifications

Bluetooth: No
Inputs: RCA, balanced XLR
Outputs: None
Dimensions (hwd): 30 x 18.5 x 25cm

Reasons to buy

+
Clear, balanced and detailed
+
Rhythmically exciting 
+
Flexible with placement

Reasons to avoid

-
Nothing of note

While the more insightful and feature-packed KEF LSX II would be our first choice at this price, it’s still difficult to think of an amplifier/passive speakers combo that could better these Acoustic Energy active speakers for the same money.

These previous What Hi-Fi? Award winners do everything with a flourish. They're relatively basic in terms of set-up and function – connect them to your source via either their RCA or balanced XLR inputs and you’re ready to go. There’s no Bluetooth, but you can always affordably attach a separate module (such as the iFi Zen Blue) post-purchase.

You'd need to invest in a more expensive pair of components to offer a marked improvement on these Acoustic Energy active speakers – and you owe it to yourself to track down a pair to discover that for yourself.

Read the full review: Acoustic Energy AE1 Active

How to set up computer speakers

Thankfully, computer speakers are by nature pretty simple to set up. They are compact systems that typically comprise two boxes, or three if they include a subwoofer. Naturally, you'll want your left and right speakers to flank your computer, laptop or monitor – either at, or just above, head height if practical, and preferably ever-so-slightly angled inwards towards your seated position. This is a general rule, but there's no harm in experimenting.

You'll want them sat on a sturdy desktop surface, though more substantial computer speakers like the KEF LSX II will invariably sound optimal on dedicated stands.

If your computer speakers come with a small subwoofer, you should keep them as close to your speakers and seat as possible – but on the floor. After all, you don't want their low-end output causing the table you (or the speakers) are working on to vibrate.

How we test computer speakers

We have state-of-the-art testing facilities in London, Reading and Bath, where our team of experienced, in-house reviewers test the majority of hi-fi and AV kit that passes through our door – including computer speakers that will fit and work on a desktop.

What Hi-Fi? is all about comparative testing, so we listen to every pair of computer speakers we review against the current leader in its field to gauge how it compares to the best-in-class competition. We keep What Hi-Fi? Award winners, such as the Ruark MR1 Mk2 in this category, in our stockrooms so we can always put new products against ones we know and love.

We are always impartial in our testing and ensure we hear every pair of computer speakers at their optimum in the scenarios they are intended for. We'll use them with different partnering source kit (phones and computers, for example) as well as play different types of music through them. Naturally, we give them plenty of listening time (and time to run in).

Really, testing computer speakers is pretty similar to testing 'standard' speakers and soundbars, in that we are testing their tonality, left/right balance, vocal clarity and overall musicality (by which we mean their rhythmic, organisation and timing abilities).

From all of our reviews, we choose the top computer speakers to feature in this Best Buy. That's why if you take the plunge and buy one of the products recommended here, or on any other Best Buy page, you can rest assured you're getting a What Hi-Fi?-approved product.

You can read more about how we test and review products on What Hi-Fi? here.

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Joe Cox
Content Director

Joe is Content Director for Specialist Tech at Future and was previously the Global Editor-in-Chief of What Hi-Fi?. He has worked on What Hi-Fi? across print and online for more than 15 years, writing news, reviews and features. He has covered product launch events across the world, from Apple to Technics, Sony and Samsung, reported from CES, the Bristol Show and Munich High End for many years, and provided comment for sites such as the BBC and the Guardian. In his spare time he enjoys playing records and cycling (not at the same time).

  • Sander
    Hi Thanks for the article.
    I was wondering why the abscence of usb input is not mentioned for the KEF LSX but "no usb input" is mentioned for the Ruark Audio MR1 Mk2 as a reason to aviod? Why the difference?

    CHeers
    Sander
    Reply
  • mikebabcock
    You should really add Edifier's line of powered bookshelf speakers to this list. I have two sets of their speakers, one for my kitchen and another on my computer desk, and while a little bigger than traditional 'computer' speakers, they provide much better power and range with a convenient remote as well.
    cf. https://www.edifier.com/ca/en/speakers/studio-1280t-2.0-powered-bookshelf
    Reply
  • northlondon
    mikebabcock said:
    You should really add Edifier's line of powered bookshelf speakers to this list. I have two sets of their speakers, one for my kitchen and another on my computer desk, and while a little bigger than traditional 'computer' speakers, they provide much better power and range with a convenient remote as well.
    cf. https://www.edifier.com/ca/en/speakers/studio-1280t-2.0-powered-bookshelf

    Agreed. They are also happier at moderate volumes than the premium units I auditioned (not so well at high though) which suits me fine for desktop speakers. Mine are now paired with a Zen Blue DAC and they sound well beyond the (literal) sum of their parts, to my ear.
    Reply
  • mikebabcock
    northlondon said:
    Agreed. are also happier at moderate volumes than the premium units I auditioned (not so well at high though) which suits me fine for desktop speakers. Mine are now paired with a Zen Blue DAC and they sound well beyond the (literal) sum of their parts, to my ear.
    I simply plugged mine into the TOSLink connector on my PC although I was tempted to get the m-Audio USB unit instead. No analog noise here.
    Reply
  • Dave M
    mikebabcock said:
    You should really add Edifier's line of powered bookshelf speakers to this list. I have two sets of their speakers, one for my kitchen and another on my computer desk, and while a little bigger than traditional 'computer' speakers, they provide much better power and range with a convenient remote as well.
    cf. https://www.edifier.com/ca/en/speakers/studio-1280t-2.0-powered-bookshelf
    Yes, also because Edifier is easily purchased in the US. Many of the speakers listed here are not
    Reply
  • Finnman
    How do the Ruark compare with the Kanto YU2 and YU4?
    Reply
  • 12th Monkey
    Given how old this thread is, I'd suggest starting a thread elsewhere if you want an answer. What might have been 'best' two years ago probably isn't any more.
    Reply