Skip to main content

DS Audio is sharing its optical phono cartridge secrets for free

DS Audio DS-W1
(Image credit: DS Audio)

DS Audio has decided to share its niche expertise in optical phono cartridge technology with the world for free. Why? The Japanese company has pioneered what has largely been an eight-year solo effort in implementing optical tech in its development of phono cartridges. Now, it wants others to join the optical audio market and help popularise the MM/MC-cartridge alternative.

DS Audio CEO and chief designer Tetsuaki Aoyagi has published literature about optical phono cartridge design on its website. He says he would like to see an increase in optical cartridge take up in more high-end audio systems – undoubtedly due to both his passion for the topic and his interest in selling the cartridges – and hopes that being open about implementation will lead electronics manufacturers to create optical cartridge-friendly tech into their phono stage and amplifier designs. Currently, a DS Audio cartridge requires its own equaliser and so isn't compatible with MM or MC phono stages.

“My goal is that optical cartridges move from being ‘unique’ to ‘popular’,” he says.

To that end, DS Audio is inviting interested manufacturers to contact them to check over proposed designs and answer questions, for free.

Back in 2015, DS Audio brought the first-ever optical cartridge to the UK, following its initial launch two years prior in Japan. It cost, ahem, nearly £7000. As would be the case for the company's following designs, which are more affordable but still very much high-end, the debut DS-W1 used a beam of light – much like you'd see via a digital optical cable – to detect the vibrations from the stylus. DS Audio's argument for this method lies around its inherent elimination of the detrimental friction associated with and caused by traditional MM or MC phono cartridges.

MORE:

Best cartridges 2021: budget and premium options for your turntable

10 of the best-sounding vinyl records

The very best record players you can buy

18 songs that sound their best on vinyl

Becky is Hi-Fi and Audio editor of What Hi-Fi?, and has been part of the team for almost eight years, with her current position preceded by roles as a staff writer and news editor. During that time she has been fortunate enough to travel the world to report on the biggest and most exciting brands in hi-fi and consumer tech (and has had the jetlag and hangovers to remember them by). In her spare time, Becky can often be found running, watching horror movies and hunting for gluten-free cake.