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Best Sony TVs 2022: budget, premium and smart

Best Sony TVs Buyer's Guide: Welcome to What Hi-Fi?'s round-up of the best Sony TVs you can buy in 2022.

Sony makes some of the best TVs around, including some awesome OLED models. If you're in the market for a new Sony TV, you came to the right place. We've rounded up the best Sony TVs available right now, from entry-level LCD TVs to premium 4K OLED TVs. 

But what should you look for when choosing a Sony TV? Which model is best for you? And can you grab a cheap Sony TV deal on Prime Day 2022? Here's a quick buyer's guide to help you cut through the confusion...

How to choose the best Sony TV for you

Sony's LCD TVs tend to be affordable options. Pricier OLED models can be unbelievably slim, and tend to offer deep blacks and superb viewing angles. Sony has even announced a QD-OLED TV for 2022.

You'll want 4K (Ultra HD) and HDR (High Dynamic Range) for a detailed picture. Sony's sets tend to support HDR10, HLG and Dolby Vision, but not HDR10+. The Japanese giant even offers 8K TVs, if you're ready to make the leap. 

Sony sets tend to use the Android TV and Google TV operating systems, which support all the major streaming apps including Netflix, Prime Video, Disney+ and Apple TV+. The platform also brings voice controls.

If you want truly immersive best sound, we'd recommend adding a soundbar. That said, Sony makes some of the best-sounding TVs around (look for models with Acoustic Surface Audio). 

Here's a look at the 2022 Sony TV lineup (although many models are yet to go on sale).

Ready to buy now? Here's our guide to the best Sony's TVs... 

Best Sony TVs: Sony A95K QD-OLED TV

(Image credit: Sony)

1. Sony XR-55A95K

It's not cheap, but the A95K is the best OLED TV we’ve tested so far.

Specifications

Screen size: 55in (also available in 65in)
Type: QD-OLED
Backlight: not applicable
Resolution: 4K
HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision
Operating system: Google TV
HDMI inputs: 4
ARC/eARC: eARC
Optical output: Yes
Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 71 x 123 x 4.3cm

Reasons to buy

+
Supremely natural, authentic picture
+
Bright highlights that others miss
+
Excellent sound by TV standards

Reasons to avoid

-
LG OLEDs are better for gaming
-
Not outright brighter than an LG G2
-
Bravia CAM's usefulness is dubious

While not the new dawn of TV technology that some may have been expecting, the 2022 Sony A95K does suggest that there are some improvements that QD-OLED offers over standard OLED, including  increased detail and colour reproduction.

The design is minimalist and the folding stand can be positioned in front of the screen, meaning the TV can be mounted more or less flush against a wall. 

Sony uses the Google TV operating system for most of its 2022 TVs, including the A95K. It's a snappy platform with plenty of apps, including the Netflix app complete with Dolby Vision and Dolby Atmos support. The A95K also features Sony Bravia Core, the firm's high-quality streaming service.

Sony's Acoustic Surface Audio+ technology, which in this case combines with two subwoofers, makes for very good sound by TV standards. Xbox Series X and high-end PC gamers will still be better served by an LG G2, but for movies and TV shows, in SDR and HDR and at all resolutions, the Sony A95K is exceptional. 

If you want the 'gold standard' of Sony TVs, this is it.

Read our full Sony A95K review

Best Sony TVs 2022: Sony XR-55A80J

(Image credit: Sony)
The best pound-for-pound Sony TV you can buy right now.

Specifications

Screen size: 55in (also available in 65in, 77in)
Type: OLED
Backlight: not applicable
Resolution: 4K
HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision
Operating system: Google TV
HDMI inputs: 4
ARC/eARC: eARC
Optical output: Yes
Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 122.7 x 73.5 x 33 cm

Reasons to buy

+
Super-sharp and detailed
+
Punchy and vibrant but natural
+
Superb motion handling

Reasons to avoid

-
Incomplete HDMI 2.1 feature set
-
Missing UK catch-up apps

Don't want to break the bank? The A80J is what we'd called a 'step-down flagship'. It's is less immediately striking than the A90J (below), but it's also a lot more affordable. Indeed, it recently picked up 'Best 55-58in TV' at the What Hi-Fi Awards 2021

For general sharpness and detail, the A80J more or less matches the flagship A90J, and that puts it head and shoulders above most rivals in those regards. Every shot is magnificently crisp.

Sound is equally impressive. Sony’s OLEDs use Acoustic Surface Audio tech, which vibrates the whole screen rather than traditional speaker drivers. The A80J’s system has half as much power (a total of 30W rather than 60W) as the A90J but again, is head and shoulder above what many other brands offer.

Netflix content is, of course, available through the A80J, and is presented – along with Amazon Prime Video and Apple TV – in 4K, Dolby Vision and Dolby Atmos, where the content allows. 

The A80J might not be quite as punchy as the A90J but, in many other ways, it’s just as capable. If you're looking for the best all-round Sony TV, this is it.

Read our full Sony XR-55A80J review

Best Sony TVs 2022: Sony XR-48A90K

(Image credit: Future)
An astonishingly good ‘small’ OLED TV from Sony's class of 2022.

Specifications

Screen size: 48in (also available in 42in)
Type: OLED
Backlight: not applicable
Resolution: 4K
HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision
Operating system: Google TV
HDMI inputs: 4
ARC/eARC: eARC
Optical output: Yes
Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 62 x 107 x 5.9cm

Reasons to buy

+
Extraordinarily sharp, solid, detailed
+
Effortless naturalism
+
Good HDMI 2.1 feature set

Reasons to avoid

-
Not as bright or insightful as some
-
LG C2 has even better gaming specs
-
Very expensive in the UK

For reasons unknown, Sony didn’t launch a new 48-inch OLED TV last year. Instead, 2020’s A9 (A9S in the US) was tasked with holding the fort against increasingly large ranks of rivals for almost two years. Has the A90K been worth the wait? And does it deliver a true flagship performance? It’s a resounding yes to both questions.

Design-wise, Sony has set out to keep the A90K as compact as possible. The display itself is surrounded by a black bezel that’s just 8mm thick at the top and about 12mm on the sides and bottom. The low-profile stand is just 50cm wide and 23cm deep, making it easy to find furniture with the necessary surface area for the TV.

Picture quality is near-flawless. This is undoubtedly one of the best 48-inch TVs we've tested on on pure picture quality. The Acoustic Surface Audio+ technology means the A90K sounds good by the standards of relatively small TVs, but we recommend that you add a soundbar.

Hardcore gamers may rue the lack of HGiG mode, but the PS5-specific Auto HDR Tone Mapping does mean that gamers on Sony’s console will automatically get a fairly accurate picture performance. 

All in all, the Sony XR-48A90K – Sony’s flagship OLED for those who don’t have the space for its new QD-OLED (above) – is a fantastic buy.

Read our full review Sony XR-48A90K review

Best Sony TVs 2022: Sony XR-55A90J

(Image credit: Future / Leonardo, Amazon Prime)
A fantastic 2021 Sony flagship packed with technology.

Specifications

Screen size: 55in (also available in 65in, 83in)
Type: OLED
Backlight: not applicable
Resolution: 4K
HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision
Operating system: Google TV
HDMI inputs: 4
ARC/eARC: eARC
Optical output: Yes
Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 71 x 122 x 4.1cm

Reasons to buy

+
Outstanding picture quality
+
Superb motion handling
+
Impressive sound

Reasons to avoid

-
No VRR (yet), buggy 4K@120Hz
-
Missing UK catch-up apps
-
Expensive

Sony’s OLEDs are highly regarded but it's often hard to justify buying one over cheaper offerings from LG. So what if Sony could produce a TV with a more satisfying user experience, and a unique high-quality movie streaming app, all while raising the picture and sound quality? That's exactly what the company's done with the 2021-released A90J.

In performance terms, the A90J is an absolute stunner. It takes OLED picture performance to new, thrilling levels while maintaining the authenticity for which Sony is justifiably renowned. The 2022 A95K QD-OLED (above) is better still, but it's also pricier.

The new Google TV operating system means the user experience is better than that of any pre-2021 Sony TV, gaming features are top-notch and the exclusive Bravia Core streaming service is a genuine value-added feature.

All in all, the X90J is simply one of the very best TVs you can buy right now. If you happen to be in the market for a Sony TV, so much the better.

Read the full Sony XR-55A90J review

Read the full Sony XR-65A90J review

Best Sony TVs 2022: Sony XR-65X90J

(Image credit: Sony/Dead White People, Netflix)
The best, big, mid-range Sony TV you can currently buy.

Specifications

Screen size: 65in (also available in 50in, 55in, 75in)
Type: LCD
Backlight: Direct LED
Resolution: 4K
HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision
Operating system: Google TV
HDMI inputs: 4
ARC/eARC: eARC
Optical output: Yes
Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 33 x 57 x 2.8 inch

Reasons to buy

+
Lovely, authentic colour balance
+
Superb motion handling
+
Solid feature set

Reasons to avoid

-
Limited blacks and viewing angles
-
Fairly rough standard-def
-
Missing UK catch-up apps

If you’re looking to add some serious cinematic scale to your living room without breaking the bank, the Sony XR-65X90J (or near-identical XR-65X94J) could be just what you’re looking for thanks to its heady mix of advanced features, excellent picture performance and agreeable price tag.

Features include two HDMI 2.1 sockets that support 4K@120Hz (but not yet VRR) and the new Google TV operating system. The picture is superbly natural, authentic and balanced, and while the sound is clear and direct.

You could buy a 55-inch OLED for around £1500 / $1500 / AU$2000, but the X90J gives you the option to go for a TV that’s a little less premium but a full 10 inches bigger. If that’s the choice you make, the X90J (or X94J) absolutely demands your attention.

If you want a bigger or smaller TV, the X90J is also available in 50-inch, 55-inch and 75-inch sizes.

Read the full Sony XR-65X90J review

Read the full Sony XR-50X90J review

Best Sony TVs 2022: Sony KD-48A9

(Image credit: Sony / The Boys, Amazon Prime)
Sony’s first 48-inch OLED TV is extraordinarily good.

Specifications

Screen size: 48in
Type: OLED
Backlight: not applicable
Resolution: 4K
HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision
Operating system: Android TV 9
HDMI inputs: 4
ARC/eARC: eARC
Optical output: Yes
Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 62 x 107 x 5.8cm

Reasons to buy

+
Striking picture
+
Bold sound
+
Solid app selection

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive
-
Lacks next-gen HDMI features

It's official: 48 is the new 55. Time was that you couldn't get an OLED TV under 55in, but then LG launched the world's first commercially available 48in OLED set. Others including Panasonic, Philips and Sony quickly followed.

This petite 2020 TV boasts tiny bezels and a low profile pedestal stand. It does have a rather large enclosure bolted onto the back (to house the speakers, processing hardware and connections), but you'll only notice if you look at the set side-on.

Sony's X1 Ultimate processor makes images suitably stunning; there's plenty of dark detail on show, and it serves up pretty much every streaming app you could hope for. Motion control is still industry-leading, and in terms of sharpness and detail, there's never been a better TV at this size. 

The only slight disappointment is the lack of some next-gen HDMI features such as 4K@120Hz (HFR)VRR (Variable Refresh Rate) and Auto Low Latency Mode. That's bad news for gamers looking to hook up a PS5 or Xbox Series X, but it shouldn't a dealbreaker. Pound for pound, this is one the best Sony TV you can buy.

Read the full Sony KD-48A9 review

Best Sony TVs 2022: Sony KD-65XH9005

(Image credit: Sony / Hunters, Amazon Prime)
Still one of the best performance-per-pound Sony TVs you can buy.

Specifications

Screen size: 65in
Type: LCD
Backlight: Full array
Resolution: 4K
HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision
Operating system: Android TV 9
HDMI inputs: 4
ARC/eARC: eARC
Optical output: Yes
Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 83.3 x 145 x 7cm

Reasons to buy

+
Superb HDR
+
Colours pop
+
Excellent motion processing

Reasons to avoid

-
Lightweight sound
-
Could be more PS5-ready

The 65XH9005 is one of the TVs that Sony is selling as "ready for PS5". That means it offers 4K@120Hz (often referred to as HFR), VRR (Variable Refresh Rate) and ALLM (Auto Low Latency Mode). Put simply, it's a great TV for those who want to max out their PS5 gaming experience.

But whether you make use of the gaming features or not, this is an awesome TV. There are plenty of connections for hooking up partner kit, and you won't be wanting for onboard tech: this is a full-array LED-backlit TV with local dimming, and supports the HDR10, HLG and Dolby Vision HDR standards, and Dolby Atmos for sound. It’s also Netflix Calibrated and IMAX Enhanced.

And the picture quality? Excellent. Sony’s X-Motion Clarity motion processing technology is reliably superb, making fast-moving pictures like games, sports and action films as smooth as butter. There are plenty of options to fiddle with, but just leave it on auto and you'll still be treated to a great experience visually. Sound is  a little lightweight, but clear enough. An ideal option for both gamers and non-gamers alike.

Read the full Sony KD-65XH9005 review

Best Sony TVs 2022: Sony XR-65X95J

(Image credit: Sony / Voir, Netflix)
This LCD is a great option for brightly-lit rooms.

Specifications

Screen size: 65in
Type: LCD
Backlight: Direct LED
Resolution: 4K
HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision
Operating system: Google TV
HDMI inputs: 4 (HDMI 2.1 x2)
ARC/eARC: eARC
Optical output: Yes
Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 44.3 x 83.5 x 6.6 cm

Reasons to buy

+
Bright and colourful pictures
+
Impressive image processing
+
Good sound quality

Reasons to avoid

-
Significant backlight blooming
-
Limited viewing angles
-
Still waiting for VRR

The XR-65X95J truly shines bright. This LCD panel might not achieve the black levels that OLED technology can, but its high brightness and potent colours enable it to serve up a sumptuous picture. 

There’s a suitably potent sound system to go with all the beautifully bold pictures, and plenty of gamer-friendly features, too, including two HDMI ports capable of handling 4K at 120Hz feeds.

The only real downside to this TV is the backlight blooming (when a bright object on the screen bleeds into darker areas around it). If that bothers you, Sony’s significantly cheaper X90J TVs deliver a more consistent viewing experience. 

Still, the X95J is, quite literally, a brilliant buy for those who want the best Sony TV for a brightly-lit room.

Read our full Sony XR-65X95J review

How we test TVs

Here at What Hi-Fi? we review hundreds of products every year – and that includes many of the best Sony TVs. So how do we come to our review verdicts? And why can you trust them?

We have state-of-the-art testing facilities in London, Bath and Reading, where our team of expert reviewers do all of our testing. This gives us complete control over the testing process, ensuring consistency. 

All products are tested in comparison with rival products in the same price category, and all review verdicts are agreed upon by the team as a whole rather than an individual reviewer, again helping to ensure consistency and avoid any personal preference.

The What Hi-Fi? team has more than 100 years experience of reviewing, testing and writing about consumer electronics.

From all of our reviews, we choose the best products to feature in our Best Buys. That's why if you take the plunge and buy one of the products recommended below, or on any other Best Buy page, you can be assured you're getting a What Hi-Fi? approved product.

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Tom Bailey

Tom is a journalist, copywriter and content designer based in the UK. He has written articles for T3, ShortList, The Sun, The Mail on Sunday, The Daily Telegraph, Elle Deco, The Sunday Times, Men's Health, Mr Porter, Oracle and many more (including What Hi-Fi?). His specialities include mobile technology, electric vehicles and video streaming.