Best Sony TVs 2023: budget, premium and smart

Best Sony TVs Buyer's Guide: Welcome to What Hi-Fi?'s round-up of the best Sony TVs you can buy in 2023.

Sony makes some of the best TVs around, including some awesome OLED models. If you're in the market for a new Sony TV, you came to the right place. We've rounded up the best Sony TVs available right now, from entry-level LCD TVs to premium 4K OLED TVs. 

But what should you look for when choosing a Sony TV? Which model is best for you? Here's a quick buyer's guide to help you cut through the confusion...

How to choose the best Sony TV for you

Why you can trust What Hi-Fi? Our expert reviewers spend hours testing and comparing products and services so you can choose the best for you. Find out more about how we test.

Sony's LCD TVs tend to be affordable options. Pricier OLED models can be unbelievably slim, and tend to offer deep blacks and superb viewing angles. Sony has even launched a QD-OLED TV for 2022.

You'll want 4K (Ultra HD) and HDR (High Dynamic Range) for a detailed picture. Sony's sets tend to support HDR10, HLG and Dolby Vision, but not HDR10+. The Japanese giant even offers 8K TVs, if you're ready to make the leap. 

Sony sets tend to use the Android TV and Google TV operating systems, which support all the major streaming apps including Netflix, Prime Video, Disney+ and Apple TV+. The platform also brings voice controls.

If you want truly immersive best sound, we'd recommend adding a soundbar. That said, Sony makes some of the best-sounding TVs around (look for models with Acoustic Surface Audio). 

Here's a look at the 2022 Sony TV lineup (although many models are yet to go on sale).

Ready to buy now? Here's our guide to the best Sony's TVs... 

Best Sony TVs: Sony A95K QD-OLED TV

Sony's first QD-OLED TV might not be a game-changer, but it is utterly brilliant. (Image credit: Sony)
It's not cheap, but the A95K is the best Sony TV we’ve ever tested.

Specifications

Screen size: 55in (also available in 65in)
Type: QD-OLED
Backlight: not applicable
Resolution: 4K
HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision
Operating system: Google TV
HDMI inputs: 4
ARC/eARC: eARC
Optical output: Yes
Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 71 x 123 x 4.3cm

Reasons to buy

+
Supremely natural, authentic picture
+
Bright highlights that others miss
+
Excellent sound by TV standards

Reasons to avoid

-
LG OLEDs are better for gaming
-
Not outright brighter than an LG G2
-
Bravia CAM's usefulness is dubious

While not the new dawn of TV technology that some may have been expecting, the 2022 Sony A95K does suggest that there are some improvements that QD-OLED offers over standard OLED, including  increased detail and colour reproduction.

The design is minimalist and the folding stand can be positioned in front of the screen, meaning the TV can be mounted more or less flush against a wall. Sony's Acoustic Surface Audio+ technology, which in this case combines with two subwoofers, makes for very good sound by TV standards.

The  snappy Google TV offers plenty of apps, including the Netflix app complete with Dolby Vision and Dolby Atmos support. The A95K also gets access to Sony Bravia Core, the firm's high-quality streaming service.

 Xbox Series X and high-end PC gamers will be better served by an LG C2 or G2, but for movies and TV shows at all resolutions, the Sony A95K is utterly exceptional. If you want the 'gold standard' of Sony TVs, this is it.

Read our full Sony A95K review

Best Sony TVs: Sony XR-55A80K

Everything about Sony's A80K OLED TV feels like the result of a true labour of love. (Image credit: Future / Netflix, Lost Bullet 2)
Sony’s superb OLED streak just won’t let up.

Specifications

Screen size: 55in (also available in 65in, 77in)
Type: OLED
Backlight: not applicable
Resolution: 4K
HDR formats supported: HLG, HDR10, Dolby Vision
Operating system: Google TV
HDMI inputs: 4
ARC/eARC: eARC
Optical output: Yes
Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 71 x 123 x 5.3cm

Reasons to buy

+
Beautifully refined and natural
+
Excellent sound quality
+
Elegant minimalistic design

Reasons to avoid

-
Not always as bright as expected
-
Some minor picture inconsistency
-
HDMI features could be even better

The 2022 A80K boasts a seriously premium spec sheet that includes a new-gen OLED panel that boosts brightness without risking screen burn. Throw in Sony’s XR Contrast feature, which uses advanced power management to boost colour and contrast without spoiling black levels, and you have a truly stunning picture.

From the front, the A80K is a nearly-bezel-free rectangle sat on simple, narrow, silver ‘skate blade’ feet that do their best not to draw your eye away from the on-screen action. Sound is provided by Sony’s ever-impressive Acoustic Surface audio system, which uses the screen itself to generate sound, is also present and correct.

The A80K’s connections are good enough without being as good as we’d like. By which we mean that while it has four HDMIs, only two of those are capable of handling the 4K/120Hz and VRR features Xbox Series X and PS5 owners are looking for these days. One of those two 4K/120Hz-capable HDMIs also has to double up as the TV’s eARC port.

Still, if you are looking for a Sony OLED TV that combines beautifully-natural images with satisfying sound, the A80K is hard to beat.

Read our full Sony XR-55A80K review 

Best Sony TVs: Sony XR-48A90K

It’s not as bright as the best big OLEDs but this flagship 48-inch TV from Sony is still exceptionally good. (Image credit: Future)
An astonishingly good ‘small’ OLED TV from Sony's class of 2022.

Specifications

Screen size: 48in (also available in 42in)
Type: OLED
Backlight: not applicable
Resolution: 4K
HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision
Operating system: Google TV
HDMI inputs: 4
ARC/eARC: eARC
Optical output: Yes
Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 62 x 107 x 5.9cm

Reasons to buy

+
Extraordinarily sharp, solid, detailed
+
Effortless naturalism
+
Good HDMI 2.1 feature set

Reasons to avoid

-
Not as bright or insightful as some
-
LG C2 has even better gaming specs
-
Very expensive in the UK

Design-wise, Sony has set out to keep the 48-inch A90K as compact as possible. The display itself is surrounded by a black bezel that’s just 8mm thick at the top and about 12mm on the sides and bottom. The low-profile stand is just 50cm wide and 23cm deep, making it easy to find furniture with the necessary surface area for the TV.

Picture quality is near-flawless. This is undoubtedly one of the best 48-inch TVs we've tested on on pure picture quality. The Acoustic Surface Audio+ technology means the A90K sounds good by the standards of relatively small TVs, but we recommend that you add a soundbar.

Hardcore gamers may rue the lack of HGiG mode, but the PS5-specific Auto HDR Tone Mapping does mean that gamers on Sony’s console will automatically get a fairly accurate picture performance. 

All in all, the Sony XR-48A90K – Sony’s flagship OLED for those who don’t have the space for its new A95K QD-OLED – is a fantastic buy.

Read our full review Sony XR-48A90K review

Looking for the 42-inch? Read our Sony XR- 42A90K review

Best Sony TVs: Sony XR-55A80J

This What Hi-Fi? Awards 2021 winner is almost as good as the awesome A90J and a whole lot more affordable. (Image credit: Sony)
The best pound-for-pound Sony TV you can buy right now.

Specifications

Screen size: 55in (also available in 65in, 77in)
Type: OLED
Backlight: not applicable
Resolution: 4K
HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision
Operating system: Google TV
HDMI inputs: 4
ARC/eARC: eARC
Optical output: Yes
Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 122.7 x 73.5 x 33 cm

Reasons to buy

+
Super-sharp and detailed
+
Punchy and vibrant but natural
+
Superb motion handling

Reasons to avoid

-
Incomplete HDMI 2.1 feature set
-
Missing UK catch-up apps

Don't want to splash out on the awesome-but-pricey A95K? The A80J is a great 'step-down flagship' . It's is less immediately striking than the A95K, but it's also a lot more affordable. Indeed, it picked up 'Best 55-58in TV' at the What Hi-Fi Awards 2021

For general sharpness and detail, the A80J more or less matches Sony's 2021 flagship, the A90J, which puts it head and shoulders above most rivals in those regards. Every shot really is magnificently crisp.

Sound is equally impressive. Sony’s OLEDs use Acoustic Surface Audio tech, which vibrates the whole screen rather than traditional speaker drivers. The A80J’s system has half as much power (a total of 30W rather than 60W) as the A90J but again, is better than what many other brands offer.

Netflix content is available through the A80J, and is presented – along with Amazon Prime Video and Apple TV – in 4K, Dolby Vision and Dolby Atmos, where the content allows. 

If you're looking for the best Sony TV at a reasonable price, this is it.

Read our full Sony XR-55A80J review

Best Sony TVs: Sony XR-55A90J

In performance terms, the 2021-released A90J remains an absolute stunner. (Image credit: Future / Leonardo, Amazon Prime)
A fantastic 2021 Sony flagship that is packed with technology.

Specifications

Screen size: 55in (also available in 65in, 83in)
Type: OLED
Backlight: not applicable
Resolution: 4K
HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision
Operating system: Google TV
HDMI inputs: 4
ARC/eARC: eARC
Optical output: Yes
Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 71 x 122 x 4.1cm

Reasons to buy

+
Outstanding picture quality
+
Superb motion handling
+
Impressive sound

Reasons to avoid

-
No VRR (yet), buggy 4K@120Hz
-
Missing UK catch-up apps
-
Expensive

Sony’s OLEDs are highly regarded but it's often hard to justify buying one over cheaper offerings from LG. So what if Sony could produce a TV with a more satisfying user experience and a high-quality movie streaming app, all the while raising the picture and sound quality? That's what the 2021-released A90J promises.

In performance terms, the A90J remains an absolute stunner. It offers exceptional OLED picture performance while maintaining the authenticity for which Sony is justifiably renowned. The 2022 A95K QD-OLED TV is even better, but it's also a lot pricier.

The latest Google TV operating system means the user experience is better than that of pre-2021 Sony TVs and gaming features are top-notch. You even get access to the exclusive Bravia Core streaming service, which we think is a genuine value-added feature.

It might not the best newest model, but the X90J is still one of the best Sony TVs on the market.

Read the full Sony XR-55A90J review

Read the full Sony XR-65A90J review

Best Sony TVs 2022: Sony XR-65X90J

Sony's XR-65X90J (or near-identical XR-65X94J) offers big screen thrills at a surprisingly affordable price. (Image credit: Sony/Dead White People, Netflix)
One of the best big-screen Sony TV you can currently buy.

Specifications

Screen size: 65in (also available in 50in, 55in, 75in)
Type: LCD
Backlight: Direct LED
Resolution: 4K
HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision
Operating system: Google TV
HDMI inputs: 4
ARC/eARC: eARC
Optical output: Yes
Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 33 x 57 x 2.8 inch

Reasons to buy

+
Lovely, authentic colour balance
+
Superb motion handling
+
Solid feature set

Reasons to avoid

-
Limited blacks and viewing angles
-
Fairly rough standard-def
-
Missing UK catch-up apps

If you’re looking to add some cinematic scale to your living room but don't want to break the bank, the Sony XR-65X90J (or near-identical XR-65X94J) could be just what you’re looking for thanks to its heady mix of advanced features, excellent picture performance and agreeable price tag.

Features include two HDMI 2.1 sockets that support 4K@120Hz (but not yet VRR) and the new Google TV operating system. The picture is superbly natural, authentic and balanced, and while the sound is clear and direct.

You could buy a premium 55-inch OLED for around £1500 / $1500 / AU$2000, but the X90J gives you the option to go for a TV that’s a little less fancy but a full 10 inches bigger. If that’s music to your ears, the X90J (or X94J) absolutely demands your attention.

Want a bigger or smaller version? The X90J is also available in 50-inch, 55-inch and 75-inch sizes.

Read the full Sony XR-65X90J review

Read the full Sony XR-50X90J review

How we test the best Sony TVs

Testing any TV is a long and complex process because a modern TV simply does so much. Not only does it need to handle a variety of content resolutions – standard-def, 1080p, 4K and sometimes 8K – and both standard dynamic range and high dynamic range (the latter in a number of formats), all of which need to be specifically tested, it also has a sound system with various advanced settings and a full smart platform. A TV is an all-in-one device in the best sense, but that also makes it a challenging review proposition.

As part of our testing process we manually check that every major app – from Netflix to All 4, Prime Video to Spotify – is not only present, but also outputting in the video and sound formats that it should. Just because there's a Disney+ app doesn't necessarily mean it's working in Dolby Vision and/or Dolby Atmos. In fact, in many recent cases it hasn't been.

We also connect both a PS5 and Xbox Series X in order to establish which advanced gaming features are and aren't supported, and on which of the TV's HDMI ports. Is 4K 120Hz supported? How about VRR? Is there a Dolby Vision game mode? Is there an HGiG preset for more accurate HDR tone mapping? We check all of these things, and measure input lag using a Leo Bodnar device.

We then test the TV's picture quality using a huge variety of content, from old DVDs to the latest 4K Blu-rays and plenty of streamed movies and TV shows in between. Every TV is tested against the best model at its price and size – we have a stockroom packed full of Award-winners for this very purpose.

We don't accept the out-of-the-box settings that a TV comes in either. While we intentionally don't go down the route of professional calibration (you shouldn't have to have your TV professionally calibrated in order to get the best out of it), we do spend hours adjusting settings using a mixture of test patterns and real-world content until we are sure we're getting the most out of a TV so that it has the best chance to shine.

While we almost always advise that a new TV is combined with a dedicated sound system such as a soundbar or AV amplifier, many people still prefer to stick with their flatscreen's built-in speakers, so we thoroughly test these too, using a wide variety of movie and music content and with great attention spent to the TV's many processing modes and individual settings.

We have state-of-the-art testing facilities in Bath and Reading, where our team of expert reviewers do all of our testing. This gives us complete control over the testing process, ensuring consistency. What's more, all review verdicts are agreed upon by the team as a whole rather than an individual reviewer, again helping to ensure consistency and avoid any personal preference.

The What Hi-Fi? team has more than 100 years experience of reviewing, testing and writing about consumer electronics.

From all of our reviews, we choose the best products to feature in our Best Buys. That's why if you take the plunge and buy one of the products recommended here, or on any other Best Buy page, you can be assured you are getting a What Hi-Fi? approved product.

Tom is a journalist, copywriter and content designer based in the UK. He has written articles for T3, ShortList, The Sun, The Mail on Sunday, The Daily Telegraph, Elle Deco, The Sunday Times, Men's Health, Mr Porter, Oracle and many more (including What Hi-Fi?). His specialities include mobile technology, electric vehicles and video streaming.