Best TV 2024: flagship OLEDs and affordable flatscreens tried and tested

There are few things as exciting as buying a new TV, but it can also be a daunting process thanks to the myriad brands, models, technologies, specs and features available.

But fear not; What Hi-Fi? has been testing TVs for decades and has hundreds of TV reviews under its belt. Our team of supremely experienced, expert reviewers has rigorously tested the latest and greatest TVs from all of the top brands in our dedicated testing facilities, so we are uniquely positioned to direct you to the best TVs and away from the also-rans.

CES 2024 has just been and gone, but the many MLA OLED, QD-OLED and Mini LED TVs revealed are still a way from hitting shops. You can click here to check out our hands-on impressions of upcoming models such as the LG G4, Samsung QN900D, Panasonic Z95A and Philips OLED909, but this page is concerned with the very best TVs you can buy right now.

Every TV below has been independently tested by our team of experts in our controlled viewing rooms, with direct side-by-side comparisons with its closest rivals – so you can trust our buying advice. You can read more about our TV testing process at the bottom of the page.

We're looking for a TV that provides as-the-director-intended picture quality, exciting but clear sound, a user-friendly operating system that features all of the major streaming services, plus support for the latest gaming features – and all at an accessible price. These are the sets that get closest to that vision of televisual perfection.

Written by
Tom Parsons
Written by
Tom Parsons

I'm What Hi-Fi?'s TV and AV Editor, and I've been testing TVs and home cinema products (as well as hi-fi kit and headphones) for over 16 years. I've always been a massive TV nerd and got into reviewing so I could find the best TVs and recommend them to others. I firmly believe that great quality shouldn't cost a fortune, so I get just as excited about great-value sets as I do the flagship models. Overall, I'm looking for a picture performance that delivers movies and TV shows as intended, a great gaming experience, an app-packed and intuitive operating system, and good sound – though I also believe that any great TV should be combined with a great, dedicated sound system.

The quick list

You can see a quick breakdown of all the TVs in this list with a short summary of what they’re best at and why we think they’re worth your money in the table below. If you want more detail you can click the photo of a TV to go to the in-depth entry, where we offer a more comprehensive breakdown of the specs, features and real-world performance.

The best TVs in 2023

Why you can trust What Hi-Fi? Our expert team reviews products in dedicated test rooms, to help you make the best choice for your budget. Find out more about how we test.

Below, you can see our picks of the best TVs currently available. Every set has been tested by our team of product experts to ensure it delivers great performance and value, so you can trust our buying advice.

Best overall

The best performance-per-pound TV you can currently buy

Specifications

Screen size: 55 inches (also available in 65in, 77in)
Type: OLED
Backlight: N/a
Resolution : 4K
HDR formats: HLG, HDR10, Dolby Vision
Operating system: Google TV
HDMI inputs: 4 (2 x 48Gbps HDMI 2.1)
Gaming features: 4K/120Hz, VRR, ALLM
ARC/eARC: eARC
Optical output? : Yes
Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 71 x 123 x 5.3cm (28" x 48" x 2.1")

Reasons to buy

+
Beautifully sharp, detailed and dynamic…
+
…yet also subtle and authentic
+
Impressively atmospheric sound

Reasons to avoid

-
Sound could be bassier
-
Slight lack of shadow detail in SDR

The Sony A80L is the TV surprise of the year. It's based on 'traditional' OLED technology (i.e. it's not a QD-OLED or MLA model) so we broadly thought we knew what to expect, but it stunned us during our extensive test by offering a picture performance with a near-perfect balance of the spectacular and the subtle. It sounds good by TV standards, too, and the feature set will be strong enough for all but the most hardcore of gamers.

The A80L looks very similar to the A80K it replaces, which is fine but the design is starting to look a little bland. It's a little thicker than rivals such as the LG C3, but partly that's down to its actuator-based sound system, which vibrates the whole screen in order to generate sound.

Around the back are four HDMI sockets, two of which are HDMI 2.1-spec and support 4K/120Hz, VRR and ALLM. One of these is also the eARC port, and if you use that to connect a soundbar or AVR you'll have just one left for a games console or gaming PC. The TV also lacks support for Dolby Vision gaming, despite Dolby Vision being present for movies and TV shows.

The seemingly effortless way that the A80L combines the spectacular with the subtle is quite extraordinary. The neon lights and holographic billboards of Blade Runner 2049’s downtown LA pop from the overall gloom of the city in brilliant fashion, but skin tones are handled with realism-boosting nuance and the seemingly hundreds of slightly different shades of grey that make up the bark of the tree at Sapper Morton’s farm are made clear to see.

The TV’s ability to subtly recreate different shades doesn’t come at the expense of dynamism, and contrast extremes such as the intro text at the start of the film emerge brightly from the pure black background. There’s a rare purity to highlights, too, such as Love’s white jacket and the light panels above her head in the records room of the Wallace Corporation.

All of these qualities combine to make an image that’s brilliantly solid and has a lovely three-dimensional feel. Detail is outstanding, too, with skin and clothing textures and complex patterns all reproduced in crisp fashion but without artificial sharpening or exposure.

Through our extensive suite of tests, our only complaint is that a bit of dark detail is missing when watching SDR content.

In terms of sound, the A80L is a bit bass-light, but that does mean that it stays composed even through our Blade Runner 2049 stress test. And while we would of course prefer deeper and weightier bass, the A80L sounds very good by the standards of TVs – particularly those at this level. Put it in the Cinema sound mode and the spaciousness of the delivery is very impressive, yet this spaciousness combines with the sort of focus that can really only come from having the sound literally coming from the screen.

The relative high quality of the A80L's sound should be a serious consideration for anyone who is looking at spending this sort of money and is determined to not add a dedicated sound system (which, for what it's worth, is very much what we recommend).

Read the full Sony A80L review

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Sony XR-55A80L scores in depth
AttributesNotesRating
PictureA brilliant performance that combines the spectacular with the natural★★★★★
SoundReally good sound for a TV but deeper bass would be nice★★★★☆
FeaturesGenerally good, but only having two HDMI 2.1 ports is disappointing★★★★☆

Best cheap

A budget TV with rare all-round ability

Specifications

Screen size: 50 inches (also available in 43in, 55in, 65in, 75in)
Type: QLED
Backlight: Full-Array LED
Resolution : 4K
HDR formats: HLG, HDR10, HDR10+, Dolby Vision
Operating system: Fire OS
HDMI inputs: 4
Gaming features: VRR, ALLM, Dolby Vision game mode
ARC/eARC: eARC
Optical output? : Yes
Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 66 x 112 x 8.4cm (26" x 44" x 3.3")

Reasons to buy

+
Balanced, consistent picture quality
+
App-packed, user-friendly OS
+
Surprisingly decent gaming specs

Reasons to avoid

-
Slightly smeary motion
-
Lacks the brightness of higher-end TVs

It’s fair to say that the standard of budget TVs has dropped significantly in recent years. Salvation is at hand, though, and from a slightly unlikely source – Amazon.

We first reviewed the 65-inch version of its Omni QLED range and discovered a TV with a surprisingly sophisticated performance to go with its surprisingly comprehensive feature set. It just missed out on five stars, but knowing how much variation there can be between different-sized versions of the ‘same’ TV, we decided to take a separate look at this 50-inch model – and we're glad we did.

This is a TV that's very good value at its full price of £650, but even so, you shouldn’t pay that much for it. That’s because it's frequently discounted by large amounts. We have seen it go as low as £400, but find it for anything under £500 and you've unearthed a bargain.

What makes the Omni QLED appear to be such a bargain is its specification, which includes a QLED panel with full-array local dimming, support for every current HDR format, gaming features such as VRR, ALLM and even Dolby Vision gaming, and the app-packed and user-friendly Fire OS operating system (which can be fully operated via Alexa, of course).

But what's most impressive about the Omni QLED is the considered and consistent nature of its performance. Too many budget TVs attempt to dazzle you despite not having the requisite ability and they end up looking awful as a result. The Omni QLED, on the other hand, works within its limits: it's not going to knock your socks off but it gets all of the basics right and delivers a picture that's true to what the creator intended. It’s natural in a way that means you don’t question the delivery and instead focus purely on what you are watching, and that’s a more impressive feat than you might imagine, particularly at this level.

On the sound front, the Omni QLED is a simple stereo affair, and all the better for it. Instead of attempting fancy processing, it simply provides a clean, clear and direct audio performance that's ideal for general TV content. You're advised to add a soundbar for movies, though.

Read the full Amazon Fire TV Omni QLED review

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Amazon Fire TV Omni QLED scores in depth
AttributesNotesRating
PictureIt's not up there with a flagship OLED, but for the money the picture is very impressive★★★★★
SoundNo fancy processing but the sound is clean, clear and direct★★★★☆
FeaturesQLED panel tech, numerous gaming features and an app-packed operating system★★★★☆

Best 42-inch

The best cheap and small OLED

Specifications

Screen size: 42 inches (also available in 48in, 55in, 65in, 77in, 83in)
Type: OLED
Resolution: 4K
HDR formats: HLG, HDR10, Dolby Vision
Operating system: webOS 23
HDMI inputs: x4, all 2.1 48Gbps
Gaming features: 4K/120, VRR, ALLM, HGiG, Dolby Vision gaming
ARC/eARC: eARC
Optical output: Yes
Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 54 x 93 x 4.1cm (21" x 37" x 1.6")

Reasons to buy

+
Sharp, solid and detailed without exaggeration
+
Amazing contrast
+
Exceptional gaming specs

Reasons to avoid

-
Minor upgrade on C2
-
Weak sound
-
Slight lack of shadow detail

LG's C-series OLED TVs are always the company's most popular, and the 42-inch C3 is the baby of the 2023 range. It's got a slightly less bright panel than the larger C3 models and it doesn't feature MLA or QD-OLED tech (which hasn't yet made it down to this sort of size), but it does boast the same exceptional feature set as well as the best overall picture quality available at this size. It's cheaper than its rivals, too.

The 42-inch C3 has a different design to its larger siblings that makes it look more like a monitor or bedroom TV. The biggest design difference is that it has two blade-like feet rather than a pedestal.

Outside of that, it retains the same core features we love about the C3 range as a whole. Specifically, it features the same Alpha 9 Gen 6 processor as every other C3 (and G3) and identical connectivity, with it sporting four PS5 and Xbox Series X/S-ready HDMI 2.1 ports that support 4K/120Hz, VRR and ALLM. It can also handle Dolby Vision gaming (right up to 120Hz, in fact) and an HGiG mode for more accurate HDR gaming.

The OLED42C3 features the same panel as other 42-inch OLED TVs such as the Sony XR-42A90K. This panel is less bright than the one used for the best and brightest larger OLED TVs, and that's before you even consider the new MLA and QD-OLED technologies.

That said, it's still more than bright enough for almost all scenarios, and the perfect blacks and pixel-level contrast control make the image exceptionally dynamic. What's more, there is an inherent advantage that 'small' 4K TVs have over their larger brethren – pixel density. Because the pixels are more tightly packed, sharpness is increased, and the crispness of the OLED42C3’s delivery actually makes its 65-inch sibling look a bit soft.

Even against other 42-inch OLEDs that have the same inherent picture traits, the C3 comes out on top. This is a bold, impactful TV that delivers images with superb solidity and dynamism, but it's also very consistent and never makes you aware of the picture processing in play.

Unfortunately, it's not the same story on the audio front. Like its larger siblings, the 42-inch C3 still suffers from a rather dull delivery. It's perfectly fine for everyday TV, but it doesn’t have the punch, weight or dynamic range to satisfyingly deliver a movie soundtrack. A soundbar is a must.

While the C3 is still a top-notch OLED now, we have just had confirmation that LG will be releasing the C4 later this year, with upgraded brightness and new AI-driven features. 

Read the full LG OLED42C3 review

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LG OLED42C3 scores in detail
AttributesNotesRating
PictureIt's by far the best budget OLED around★★★★★
SoundYou'll want to pair it with a soundbar★★★☆☆
FeaturesFour HDMI 2.1 sockets with support for every gaming feature worth having★★★★★

Best 48-inch

Sound aside, there’s no better 48-inch TV

Specifications

Screen size: 48 inches (also available in 42in, 55in, 65in, 77in, 83in)
Type: OLED
Resolution: 4K
HDR formats: HLG, HDR10, Dolby Vision
Operating system: webOS 23
HDMI inputs: x4, all 2.1 48Gbps
Gaming features: 4K/120, VRR, ALLM, HGiG, Dolby Vision gaming
ARC/eARC: eARC
Optical output: Yes
Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 62 x 107 x 4.7cm (24" x 42" x 1.9")

Reasons to buy

+
Crisp, contrasty yet balanced picture
+
Superb gaming specs
+
Very user-friendly

Reasons to avoid

-
Dull sound
-
Only slightly better than the C2

The C3 is the latest in LG’s long-running and stonkingly popular C-series of OLED TVs. That popularity is well-earned: LG’s C-series has been a near-perfect intersection of performance, features and price for years, and not just compared with other LG OLEDs, but with TVs in general.

The 48-inch C3 looks different to both the 42-inch and 65-inch models that we have also tested. While the 42-inch model has desktop-friendly feet, this 48-inch version has the same compact pedestal stand as its larger siblings. That makes it less fussy about placement but does also make it a little harder to find space for a soundbar.

And while the 65-inch model boasts an astonishingly lightweight and minimalist chassis, much more of this 48-inch version's rear is covered by the plastic enclosure that contains the set's processing hardware, connections and speakers. That said, the 48-inch C3 is still only 4.7cm thick at its chunkiest, which is pretty slim by modern TV standards.

Moving on to features, you simply won't find a better-specified TV at this size. While neither MLA nor QD-OLED technology have made it below 55 inches yet, the C3 uses the best 48-inch OLED panel currently available from sister company LG Display. This panel can't be pushed as bright as that of the larger models (apparently because of how tightly packed the OLEDs are) and the 48-inch C3 goes plenty bright enough.

All four of its HDMI sockets are 48Gbps 2.1-spec affairs that support 4K/120Hz, VRR and ALLM, and it supports Dolby Vision gaming and has a really well-implemented HGiG setting that makes it a doddle to get more accurate HDR with many modern games.

In action, the 48-inch C3 delivers precisely the sort of bold and brassy picture presentation we’ve come to expect from this year’s C-series models. Brilliantly bright and punchy one second, subtle and considered the next, the C3 delivers precisely what's required at all times.

It produces an image that’s really solid and has a three-dimensional feel, too. In fact, the increased pixel density of having a 4K resolution squeezed into a 48-inch space means this smaller C3 looks significantly sharper than its 65-inch sibling (though also slightly less sharp than the 42-inch model). The C3 boasts superb contrast, too, which further contributes to the solidity of the image, and the inky blacks of OLED plus the C3’s particularly bold approach make for an image that’s packed with punch.

This 48-inch C3 actually sounds a little more upfront and engaging than its siblings did when we reviewed them, with a little more punch to effects and a degree of dynamic range. However, it's all too easy to provoke the set into bassy distortion that's horribly distracting, and the presentation is often cluttered and uncultured. LG just can't seem to get the sound right with its TVs.

There are very few TVs that sound good, though, so we almost always recommend adding a soundbar. Follow that advice and the 48-inch C3 is comfortably the best TV at its size.

As is the case with the 42-inch model, the 48-inch is about to be succeeded by the C4, which was recently revealed at CES. The C3 should stick around for the best part of a year, however, and likely at a discounted price.

Read the full LG OLED48C3 review

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LG OLED48C3 scores in detail
AttributesNotesRating
PictureExcellent balance of dynamism and subtlety★★★★★
SoundFine for everyday TV but sadly lacking for movies★★★☆☆
FeaturesFour HDMI 2.1 sockets with every significant spec flawlessly implemented★★★★★

Best premium

Sony's second-generation QD-OLED is a very special TV indeed

Specifications

Screen size: 65 inches (also available in 55in, 77in)
Type: QD-OLED
Backlight: N/a
Resolution : 4K
HDR formats: HLG, HDR10, Dolby Vision
Operating system: Google TV
HDMI inputs: 4 (2 x 48Gbps HDMI 2.1)
Gaming features: 4K/120Hz, VRR, ALLM
ARC/eARC: eARC
Optical output? : Yes
Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 83 x 144 x 3.4cm (33" x 57" x 1.4")

Reasons to buy

+
Stunning brightness, contrast and colours
+
But even-handed and authentic, too
+
Crisp, direct and spacious sound

Reasons to avoid

-
Still only two HDMI 2.1 sockets
-
Some gaming features coming later
-
No UK catch-up apps

The A95L is the successor to the A95K, arguably the best TV of last year if you don't take price into account. One of the two first QD-OLED TVs launched, it trumped its Samsung S95B rival by deploying its brightness-boosting, vibrancy-adding Quantum Dots in a more considered and authentic fashion – and by offering a far superior sound system to boot.

The promise of second-generation QD-OLED panels is an even brighter and more efficient performance, but we were just as excited to find out how the team at Sony could refine the performance further with an extra year of experience with the new panel technology. Having now put the Sony A95L up against pretty much every other TV you might be considering, we can safely say that it is, with very little doubt, the very best TV you can currently buy.

Playing the super-bright Pan 4K Blu-ray, the A95L's additional brightness and colour vibrancy over the step-down Sony A80L and even the MLA-boosted Panasonic MZ2000 are immediately clear in the first scene's streetlamps and headlights, which are reproduced with a more intense and accurate yellow glow. The A95L also reproduces the moon over London with greater brightness and some subtle pink shading and texture detail that its rivals miss.

There's no loss of black depth, though, with the grimy streets of Victorian London being both oppressively dark and packed with shadow detail. What's more, the A95L also reproduces colours expertly in these darkest parts of the picture so that skin tones remain accurate and lifelike where other TVs allow them to go a bit pale.

The brighter highlights combine with OLED's perfect, inky blacks to increase contrast, which helps to reinforce edges and textures, in turn increasing the solidity and three-dimensionality of the picture. Thankfully, this is also combined with supreme subtlety, so the lights shining on a tiled wall reveal all sorts of subtle shades on the A95L, and as Peter peers into a bottle in Mother Barnabus's office, the little ship inside is resolved with fabulous fine detail and excellent solidity.

What's perhaps most impressive is the way that the A95L achieves all of its pop and dynamism without eroding subtlety or authenticity in the way that Samsung's S95C QD-OLED is occasionally guilty of.

While less-bright HDR movies and SDR content don't show off the A95L's advantages quite as strongly, it's still a cut above its rivals with everything we watch during testing, particularly in terms of colour vibrancy and accuracy.

For sound, the A95L uses a very slightly tweaked version of the 2.2-channel actuator-based sound system of the A95K. Two actuators vibrate the whole screen in order to produce sound, backed up by two regular woofers that add bass. This results in a level of directness that other TVs can't match, with dialogue that literally comes from the screen.

What's surprising is the way this sound system also extends the sonic presentation far to the sides and above the set, creating a very impressive pseudo-Atmos effect. On top of that, the sound is crisp, clear and detailed. Some extra bass weight and depth would be nice, but this is still very good sound by TV standards.

The A95L only has a couple of deficiencies and they won't bother everyone. Gamers will be disappointed that there are still only two HDMI 2.1 sockets (one of which inconveniently doubles as the eARC port) and that Dolby Vision gaming is coming at a later date. The terrestrial catch-up apps are coming later, too, which is particularly annoying in the case of BBC iPlayer. You can solve that by adding an inexpensive video streamer, but you shouldn't have to.

Those flaws are well worth putting up with, though, because the Sony A95L is an absolutely stunning performer.

Read the full Sony A95L review

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Sony A95L scores in depth
AttributesNotesRating
PictureStunning brightness and vibrancy but with excellent subtlety and authenticity★★★★★
SoundCrisp, clear and direct, but with impressive spaciousness, too★★★★★
FeaturesGood overall but let down slightly by having just two HDMI 2.1 sockets and no UK catch-up apps★★★★☆

Best budget large UK & AU

Hands down the year’s biggest TV bargain

Specifications

Screen size: 65 inches (also available in 55in, 75in and 85in)
Type: QLED
Backlight: Mini LED
Resolution : 4K
HDR formats: HLG, HDR10, HDR10+, Dolby Vision
Operating system: Google TV
HDMI inputs: 4 (2 x 48Gbps HDMI 2.1)
Gaming features: 4K/120Hz, VRR, ALLM, Dolby Vision game mode
ARC/eARC: eARC
Optical output? : Yes
Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 83 x 145 x 8.5cm

Reasons to buy

+
Stunningly bright, contrast-rich and colourful
+
Comprehensive gaming features
+
Incredible value

Reasons to avoid

-
Picture needs careful set up
-
Minor clouding with some HDR images
-
Occasional subwoofer buzzing

TCL has been pretty forthright in recent times about its belief that LED – especially Mini LED – is the future of TV, rather than OLED, and the C845K is the brand's latest attempt to put its money where its mouth is.

TCL's 2023 flagship model for the UK and Australia (US buyers, check out this alternative), the C845K features a Quantum Dot display with a Mini LED backlight that boasts (in the case of the 65-inch model tested) 576 separate dimming zones and a peak brightness figure of 2000 nits. These are huge numbers for a TV at this price and dwarf those of many TVs costing vastly more.

Of course, specs are only part of what dictates a TV's performance, but the C845K backs up its attention-grabbing numbers with an equally attention-grabbing performance.

Its pictures really do jump off the screen with an intensity far beyond anything else we have seen at anything like the same price. In fact, they leave the vast majority of much more expensive mid-range