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Grado Statement GS3000x wooden headphones boast its biggest driver yet

Grado Statement GS3000X wooden headphones boast its biggest driver yet
(Image credit: Grado)

Grado has announced two new Statement X headphones. The Statement GS3000x follow on from the five-star GS3000e and boast the firm's largest, most powerful driver ever.

They keep Grado's trademark wooden finish and, like the GS3000e, they use a tropical hardwood called cocobolo. Grado claims the 52mm driver – up from 50mm on the GS3000e – is specifically tuned to "embrace the tenacity of cocobolo and precision of metal" (there's also a metal inner chamber). It also offers a more powerful magnetic circuit, a voice coil with decreased effective mass, and a reconfigured diaphragm. 

Grado has also announced the GS1000x, the latest in its long-running GS1000 range. For the first time, it has a casing made of mahogany and ipê wood – Grado has long used mahogany in its designs, but ipê is new for this instalment. Grado claims it improves the structural integrity of the sound.

“I remember trying on the first GS1000 decades ago when my dad (John Grado) brought the first pair upstairs from the workbench”, says Jonathan Grado. “I was seven or eight and they swallowed my head. The fact that they are in their fourth generation today is a testament to the design of the original GS1000. And I’m sure my mom has that photo somewhere.”

As ever, the headphones are hand assembled in Brooklyn, New York, and also benefit from Grado's improved 12-conductor braided cable and new headbands.

Both models go on sale in September. The Grado Statement GS1000x cost £1,295 /  $1195 (about AU$2237), or with Balanced XLR Connectors they are £1,495 / $1365 (about AU$2583). 

The Grado Statement GS3000x are £2,195 / $1995 (about AU$3795) without Balanced XLR Connectors, or £2,395 / $2165 (about AU$4141) with.

MORE:

These are the best stereo headphones

Check out our Grado GS3000e review

And our latest Grado RS1x review

John Grado: humble beginnings, why headphones, and finally going wireless

Joe has been writing about tech for 17 years, first on staff at T3 magazine, then in a freelance capacity for Stuff, The Sunday Times Travel Magazine, Men's Health, GQ, The Mirror, Trusted Reviews, TechRadar and many more (including What Hi-Fi?). His specialities include all things mobile, headphones and speakers that he can't justifying spending money on.

  • Valkyr09
    No. At this price, the competition breasts the grados. They kept the same cable which cannot be changed and is heavy asa guitar cable. And the cups are a heat magnet. They are not comfortable and at this price this is a big no
    Reply
  • 12th Monkey
    Valkyr09 said:
    No. At this price, the competition breasts the grados. They kept the same cable which cannot be changed and is heavy asa guitar cable. And the cups are a heat magnet. They are not comfortable and at this price this is a big no
    You have made three posts so far, all rubbishing Grado headphones. Might be time to participate more constructively, perhaps...
    Reply
  • Valkyr09
    Hahaha. Sorry. Did not mean to troll. I have been a fan of grado before so I am talking from experience. It's just I see posts of grado with really expensive cans which do not make sense. I read similar reviews on grado which praises them without pointing to the issues with these cans. The same issues you have on the rs 2e or the sr 325 are also on the other cans above $3k. I'm commenting because these are not being highlighted. Anyway I'll be commenting on the hifiman and focal instead. 😊
    Reply