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Samsung's next-gen QNED TV technology moves a step closer to launch

Samsung's new QNED TV tech said to be nearly ready
(Image credit: Samsung)

Samsung Display has patented the structure of its next-gen QNED display technology, meaning the South Korean giant could be close to launching its first-ever QNED TV.

Core patents uncovered by UBI Research (via theelec) suggest that Samsung Display is "wrapping up" development on the QNED project, having introduced some clever engineering that ensures "screen uniformity". 

The patents also seem to reveal how QNED (Quantum Nano Emitting Diode) stacks quantum dots (tiny man-made crystals) and colour filters on a thin-film transistor. Unlike OLED displays, the QNED pixel electrodes and electrode lines are perfectly aligned for uniform control.

Samsung launched its first-ever Neo QLED Mini LED TVs earlier this year and is heavily rumoured to be launching new QD-OLED TVs in 2022, but the arrival of QNED TVs could bring the industry's best picture quality yet. 

According to UBI Research, Samsung believes the tech will offer a better colour gamut and higher brightness than OLED, the (comparatively) affordable high-end display technology developed by rival electronics giant LG. 

Rumours that Samsung Display has a prototype QNED panel ready to show off have been circulating for months, so today's news isn't a major surprise. That said, there's still no definitive word on when Samsung will announce its first-ever QNED TV. Could it be 2022? It's possible, but the technology could arrive with a very expensive price tag. 

In the meantime, those looking for a futuristic Samsung TV might want to consider the firm's 76-inch MicroLED TV.

MORE:

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Samsung 2021 TV lineup: everything you need to know

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Tom has been writing about tech for 17 years, first on staff at T3 magazine, then in a freelance capacity for Men's Health, ShortList, The Sun, The Mail on Sunday, The Daily Telegraph and many more (including What Hi-Fi?). His specialities include mobile tech, electric cars and video streaming.