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NEWS: NAD adds Viso Two to one-box home cinema range

First there was the Viso Five, that we reported on in January, and now NAD has added the stereo Viso Two to its range of one-box cinema systems.

The £700 Viso Two is a DVD/CD receiver with FM/AM tuner and built-in amplification. It provides virtual surround sound from two speakers, using its Dolby Virtual Speaker mode, and can also play DVD-Audio discs in stereo.

DVD pictures are delivered in progressive scan, and can be upscaled to 1080i resolution. There's a single HDMI video output, and a range of video capabilities, including multi-angle, multi-sound, multi-subtitle, frame, zoom and repeat.

The standard FM/AM tuner has 30 presets and RDS capability. An optional DAB module, the NAD DB1, costs £120.

iPod owners are catered for with NAD's optional new IPD-1 dock (£70), which can be integrated with the system and enables an iPod to be controlled using the unit's standard HTR-6 remote control.

And if you want to add extra components to your set-up, the Viso Two has inputs for three additional video sources and includes a front-panel input for cameras and games consoles.

A six-channel audio source can also be connected, and there are optical and coaxial digital inputs as well.

To turn the Two into a 2.1 system you can add an active subwoofer using the line-level output, and an RS-232 data port allows the unit to be connected to automated home control systems.

The Viso Two will be available in the UK from April and will be distributed by Armour Home Electronics.

Technorati Tags: AM, CD, DAB, Dolby Virtual, DVD, DVD-Audio, home cinema, Home cinema in a box, iPod, iPod dock, upscaling

Andy Clough

Andy is Global Brand Director of What Hi-Fi? and has been a technology journalist for 30 years. During that time he has covered everything from VHS and Betamax, MiniDisc and DCC to CDi, Laserdisc and 3D TV, and any number of other formats that have come and gone. He loves nothing better than a good old format war. Andy edited several hi-fi and home cinema magazines before relaunching whathifi.com in 2008 and helping turn it into the global success it is today. When not listening to music or watching TV, he spends far too much of his time reading about cars he can't afford to buy.