Naim Uniti Nova PE is brand's most powerful streaming player yet

Naim Uniti Nova PE on white background
(Image credit: Naim)

If you’ve ever eyed up the Naim Uniti range but found it coming up short when it comes to power output, the brand has just announced its most powerful streaming player to date. 

Almost doubling the power of the regular 80W-per-channel Uniti Nova, the Uniti Nova PE (which stands for "Power Edition") is a convenient just-add-speakers music streaming system that packs 150W of power per channel (into 8 Ohms). 

That means it should be able to drive even the most demanding of speakers, to fill the largest of rooms. However, there is something of a twist – and audio purists might want to look away now.

The big news here is that Naim's general preference for Class AB amplification has been swapped out for Class D amplification instead. Of course, the brand does have some experience here, having used it with the Mu-So family and in its Naim for Bentley in-car amplifier, but this is perhaps one of its most notable inclusions yet. 

Naim says the resulting sound will be punchier and expressive, but still as eloquent and considered as we’ve come to expect from this five-star range. 

Naim Uniti Nova PE back panel shot on white background

(Image credit: Naim)

Just as the original Nova does, the Uniti Nova PE offers a plethora of connectivity options for music playback.

For digital sources, that includes two lots of optical (up to 24-bit/96kHz), and coaxial (up to 24-bit/192kHz, DSD 64) inputs, and one each of BNC (up to 24-bit/192kHz, DSD 64) and HDMI ins. There’s also a USB-A input both front and back for attaching external drives, and a headphone output for private listening up front too.

For analogue, you have the choice of RCA and 5-pin DIN inputs, plus you’ll also find a second set of RCA outputs for bi-amping your speakers or adding a subwoofer, should you wish. 

Wi-fi is on board (802.11 b/g/n/ac) for direct access to internet radio stations and music streaming services, including Tidal Connect, Qobuz, Spotify Connect and Apple Music, plus there is support for AirPlay 2, Chromecast, UPnP and it’s Roon Ready to boot.

Naim Uniti Nova PE with colour screen on white background

(Image credit: Naim)

You’ll also get aptX Adaptive Bluetooth built-in, plus the ability to stream multi-room with other Naim players.

This is all wrapped up in a familiar brushed aluminium casing with a 5-inch colour screen and surely the best volume dial known to man. There are a handful of quick-access buttons next to the display, but further controls can be found on the included remote, which handily doesn’t require line of sight to work.

The Naim Uniti Nova PE will be available in mid-February for £8,600/$10,000/€10,000.

MORE:

Should you buy a streaming amplifier?

Read our Naim Uniti Nova review

Or the Award-winning Naim Uniti Atom review

Verity Burns

Verity is a freelance technology journalist and former Multimedia Editor at What Hi-Fi?. 


Having chalked up more than 15 years in the industry, she has covered the highs and lows across the breadth of consumer tech, sometimes travelling to the other side of the world to do so. With a specialism in audio and TV, however, it means she's managed to spend a lot of time watching films and listening to music in the name of "work".


You'll occasionally catch her on BBC Radio commenting on the latest tech news stories, and always find her in the living room, tweaking terrible TV settings at parties.

  • manicm
    At twice the price of the regular Nova, it's ugly and they should have given its facia a substantial redesign.
    Reply
  • podknocker
    They really are ugly slabs of horror. The gap in the middle is just inviting muck and dust. Overpriced, ugly and I don't know why this company is worshipped within HIFI circles.

    I did say a while back that Class D would be the next big thing and this move from Naim will possibly tempt other companies to adopt this topology.

    I think the market is heading towards small, light and efficient devices. Naim owners probably don't care about the price of energy, but Class D is inevitably the future.
    Reply
  • Hifiman
    manicm said:
    At twice the price of the regular Nova, it's ugly and they should have given its facia a substantial redesign.
    I do not understand what justifies double the price either, especially since high power outputs are traditionally much easier to achieve with Class D amplification. And that is before many audiophiles weigh in with their opinions concerning the relative merits of Class AB and Class D amplification.
    Reply
  • nopiano
    Hifiman said:
    I do not understand what justifies double the price either, especially since high power outputs are traditionally much easier to achieve with Class D amplification. And that is before many audiophiles weigh in with their opinions concerning the relative merits of Class AB and Class D amplification.
    Especially as it’s remarkably similar to the Award winning Cambridge Evo 150 that uses a similar Hypex amp module, does streaming and has a phono stage. The rub is it costs just one-quarter of the price of the Naim!

    Comparision test incoming I hope, WHF!
    Reply
  • manicm
    nopiano said:
    Especially as it’s remarkably similar to the Award winning Cambridge Evo 150 that uses the same Hypex amp module, does streaming and has a phono stage. The rub is it costs just one-quarter of the price of the Naim!

    Comparision test incoming I hope, WHF!

    Actually it's not clear which amp chips they use, Naim doesn't say.
    Reply
  • nopiano
    manicm said:
    Actually it's not clear which amp chips they use, Naim doesn't say.
    No, they don’t seem to, and I thought I’d seen both Hypex and Purifi mentioned in various reports. But now I can only see Purifi, so I’ve amended my post #5 to say ‘similar’.
    Reply
  • sg1410
    £8,600? 🤣🤣🤣
    Reply
  • bigmoose
    manicm said:
    At twice the price of the regular Nova, it's ugly and they should have given its facia a substantial redesign.
    Coming from Linn, that was my thought as well. In reality however, they do look fantastic and their somewhat-understated design means they fit into a lounge easily without attracting attention. I’m not a fan of how they increased the heigth of the unit - And the price! I’d rather keep my unit and get a more powerful class AB power amp.
    Reply
  • Romulus
    On first blush a lot of people are turned off by what this component is offering at an expensive price of £8,600. A review with comparison components is required. I think maybe Naim have gone beyond themselves in believing too much of their own popularity. A class D amp in components usually with other brands allows a competitive price, but Naim seem to have passed by this opportunity, maybe they are taking the Naim cult for granted....?
    Reply