Skip to main content

Sonos stops asking customers to return the extra speakers they were sent

Sonos stops asking customers to return the extra speakers they were sent
(Image credit: Future)

Sonos is no longer asking customers to return unwanted speakers that it accidentally sent them

Earlier this week, it emerged that a software glitch had caused the multi-room specialist to fulfil some orders multiple times, with customers receiving many more devices than they had bought. Sonos initially charged some of those affected and offered them a discount once they returned their unordered devices. But now it's reversed its approach and is letting the customers keep the speakers.

The FTC categorises unsolicited devices arriving as "gifts", with consumers under no obligation to return them. Sonos had emailed affected customers asking them to return the devices via a Sonos courier, with refunds being issued in around 10 days' time. But now Sonos spokesperson Madeline Krebs told The Verge (opens in new tab) "Sonos does not require the return of extra equipment and respects the decision of each impacted customer. We have and will continue to be in full compliance with FTC requirements."

The FTC website states (opens in new tab): "By law, companies can’t send unordered merchandise to you, then demand payment. That means you never have to pay for things you get but didn’t order. You also don’t have to return unordered merchandise. You’re legally entitled to keep it as a free gift."

It's likely Sonos realised that legally it didn't have a leg to stand on and has just had to take it on the chin. Look out for lots of Sonos kit flooding an auction site near you soon.

MORE:

Check out these Sonos Roam tips, tricks and features

Read our guide to the best Bluetooth speakers

Find out Which Sonos speaker should you buy?

Joe has been writing about tech for 17 years, first on staff at T3 magazine, then in a freelance capacity for Stuff, The Sunday Times Travel Magazine, Men's Health, GQ, The Mirror, Trusted Reviews, TechRadar and many more (including What Hi-Fi?). His specialities include all things mobile, headphones and speakers that he can't justifying spending money on.