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Huawei Vision is a 4K Quantum Dot TV packed full of AI

Huawei Vision is a 4K Quantum Dot TV packed full of AI
(Image credit: Future)

Huawei has taken the wraps off its first 4K TV, the Huawei Vision. Unveiled at the launch of the new flagship Huawei Mate 30 and Mate 30 Pro smartphones.

Following in the footsteps of sister brand, Honor, and the launch of the Honor Vision TV, the Huawei Vision is a 4K TV that uses Quantum Dot screen technology and the company's own Harmony OS.

It will launch in 65 and 75 inch screen sizes, with 55 and 85 inch models set to follow. Huawei was low on details but high on attention-grabbing slides and specs at the launch event, as it toted a TV with premium video, audio and artificial intelligence (AI) features.

The screen will support high color gamut video, a refresh rate up to 120Hz, plus video calls and voice control. There's a touch remote controller with Bluetooth 5.0, too and you can throw content from a Huawei phone straight to the screen.

There's AI Video call, complete with face recognition and tracking, AI Fitness, promising the slightly-scary sounding skeletal joint recognition, and AI Kids, which has pitch (presumably voice) and body recognition. The merits of all this AI tech weren't covered in great detail but clearly Huawei wants us to think it means business in the TV world.

Huawei Vision TV

(Image credit: Future)

It's not just about the picture and AI, Huawei is toting intelligent sound, too. An "8+1+1 Intelligent Sound System". We can't wait for someone to work out what this means. Realistically, that someone will have to be in China, where this TV is likely to remain for now.

There's no word on a price or a release date, and with Huawei continuing to battle with intelligence agencies around the world over the security of their phones and the close ties with the Chinese government, the Huawei Vision looks unlikely to be in the What Hi-Fi? test rooms any time soon.

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