Best music streamers 2024: top network audio streamers tested by our experts

Best music streamers: quick menu

If you're converting to a digital music set up and need to add wireless streaming powers to your hi-fi system, you've come to the right place. Despite the enduring love for physical formats such as vinyl and CDs, there's no escaping the fact that online streaming is both inescapable and convenient in today's landscape. 

Being able to play music on your home audio system wirelessly (and from a variety of online sources) is a hugely convenient and versatile way of listening these days. It's also a great way for music lovers – especially those who value hi-res digital music playback – to access all their songs and listen in the highest quality possible.

However, if it's important to you that your music sounds the best it possibly can, no matter how you choose to listen, a dedicated network audio streamer is a must-have for your digital hi-fi needs. Whether you're looking to play locally stored lossless files or access CD-quality tracks from top-tier music subscription services, choosing a music streamer as your source is the best way to do them justice.

There's more choice than ever before when it comes to music streamers, with more compact and budget models from WiiM and Cambridge Audio joining high-end models from Arcam, Naim and Linn, all furnished with the latest specs to keep everyone happy. But which network streamer is the best option for you? Every music streamer on this list has been thoroughly tested by the team of expert reviewers at What Hi-Fi? in our dedicated listening rooms, so our recommendations below are the result of real-world, in-house testing. You can read more about our music streamers testing process below, or scroll down to see our guide to the best streamer at every budget to make your decision.

The quick list

Written by
Kashfia Kabir
Written by
Kashfia Kabir

I'm the Hi-Fi and Audio Editor of What Hi-Fi? and have been reviewing hi-fi and audio products for the best part of a decade. When testing and recommending the best network music streamers, I value excellent sound performance and look out for a seamless experience considering the numerous streaming methods and music services these multi-tasking products have to juggle. During testing, I put particular focus on how user-friendly the streamer and accompanying app are, and make sure there are no dropouts or hiccups when streaming. My top picks in this list range from the affordable to the high-end, and all have passed these crucial tests to deliver the best performance expected at their price point.

Best music streamer overall

What Hi-Fi? Awards winner. The MXN10 is the finest affordable music streamer on the market today.

Specifications

Sources: AirPlay 2, Bluetooth 5.0, Google Chromecast, Spotify Connect, Tidal, Deezer, Qobuz, Internet Radio
Network: Wi-fi, ethernet
Inputs: N/A
Outputs: Coaxial, optical, RCA line level
Headphone output: No
Max file resolution: 32-bit/768kHz PCM, DSD512
Dimensions (hwd) : 5.2 x 21.5 x 19.1cm
Weight: 1.2kg

Reasons to buy

+
Brilliant all-round sonic performance
+
Affordable price
+
Great streaming features and file compatibility

Reasons to avoid

-
Somewhat basic physical controls
-
No MQA support via Tidal
-
No on-unit display

Until we reviewed the WiiM Pro Plus (below), the Cambridge Audio MXN10 was the most affordable music streamer to pass our test rooms. It still remains great value, however, and delivers so much performance out of its dinky stature, for what we think is still an affordable, entry-level price tag to the world of music streaming. The strikingly minimalist streamer doesn’t come with a remote, nor are many physical connections on the back – an RCA line level analogue output, one coaxial and one optical are all you get – yet this tiny titan still offers everything you need by delivering truly five-star levels of performance.

Controlled via Cambridge Audio’s tidy StreamMagic app, the MXN10 hosts a plethora of streaming methods and services, including Google Chromecast, AirPlay 2, Spotify Connect, Tidal, Deezer, Qobuz and internet radio, as well as support for Bluetooth 5.0 and playback of files stored elsewhere on your local network. It's a breeze to use.

Effectively encompassing its older brother CXN (V2)'s performance on a smaller scale (in size and price), the MXN10 impressed us by delivering much of that musical cohesion and rhythmic and dynamic prowess we like so much in the CXN. Compared with its rival Bluesound Node (2021), the MXN10 adds a new layer of dynamic expression and rhythmic agility that sounds more authentic to the original song. Scale and authority are impressive from such a dinky device, while the tone and texture of instruments come to the fore with a great amount of detail. It's balanced and energetic, and turns its hand to every music genre we play through it.

If you have a tight budget and a small space, but want a step-up in hi-fi performance than the WiiM, this MXN10 has the sonic chops and is a seriously impressive piece of kit for this still relatively affordable price tag.

Read the full Cambridge Audio MXN10 review

Best budget music streamer

What Hi-Fi? Awards winner. Potent performance from a terrifically budget music streamer.

Specifications

Sources: AirPlay 2, Bluetooth 5.1, Google Chromecast, Spotify Connect, Tidal Connect, Qobuz, Deezer, Amazon Music, TuneIn internet radio
Network: Wi-fi, internet
Inputs: Line level stereo RCA, digital optical
Outputs: Line level stereo RCA, digital optical, digital coaxial
Headphone output: No
Max file resolution: 32bit/384kHz; DSD512
Dimensions (hwd): 42 x 140 x 140mm
Weight: 400g

Reasons to buy

+
Detailed, expressive and organised sound
+
Great control app
+
Simple to set up and operate

Reasons to avoid

-
Plasticky build
-
Could conceivably sound more muscular

The WiiM Pro Plus is less than half the price of the budget music streamers we'd previously reviewed (see Cambridge Audio MXN10, above), and this tiny, extremely affordable unit impressed us so much that we knew it was worthy of a 2023 What Hi-Fi? Award win when we first reviewed it.

It's as feature-packed as any of its pricier alternatives, with AirPlay 2, Google Chromecast, Tidal Connect, Spotify Connect and both wi-fi and ethernet connections available. The WiiM control app is its crowning glory – set up is swift and fuss-free, everything is logically laid out, and its user-friendliness will win many over. Through the app, you get access to all other streaming apps and music stored on the same network. It also has line-level RCA, coaxial and optical connections, and can handle digital audio files at a resolution of up to 32-bit/768kHz and DSD512. That's more versatile than we'd expect at this budget end.

It's ideal for adding streaming powers cheaply and easily to an older hi-fi system, but can also be used as a way of creating a multi-room system with existing kit.

On the audio quality front, the Pro Plus delivers a sound that's clear, detailed and even quite dynamically adept. Feed it high-quality source files, and you'll be rewarded with a big soundstage with instruments all relayed in an assured and confident manner. Voices in particular get the benefit of this quality, as the midrange is full of character, attitude and emotion. It's not quite as muscular or as richly textured as its pricier alternatives, but there's plenty of attack that keeps a song's natural rhythm flowing. We certainly found ourselves enjoying every minute of it.

There is a brand new WiiM Ultra launched at High End Munich 2024 that adds a touchscreen display, more connectivity options and a new DAC chip, but it's pricier at $329 / AU$599 and we have yet to review this step-up model. Regardless of that, the Pro Plus is a well-executed streamer that's easy to use, sounds accomplished and is packed with features. At its affordable price, we couldn't ask for more.

Read the full WiiM Pro Plus review

Best mid-price music streamer

An excellent step-up streamer with extensive features and incredibly clean, spacious and articulate sound.

Specifications

Sources: UPnP, AirPlay 2, Chromecast, internet radio, Spotify Connect, Tidal Connect, Roon Ready
Network: Wi-fi, ethernet
Inputs: Coaxial, optical, USB type A, USB type B
Outputs: Coaxial, optical, balanced XLR, RCA line level
Headphone output: No
Max file resolution: 32-bit/768kHz PCM, DSD512, MQA
Dimensions (hwd) : 8.5 x 43 x 30.5cm
Weight: 3.55kg

Reasons to buy

+
Clean, precise and articulate sound
+
Expansive, open soundstage
+
Extensive features and specs
+
Lovely to use

Reasons to avoid

-
Loses a touch of its predecessor’s sonic solidity and warmth

Following a much-loved, illustrious product such as the Cambridge Audio CXN (V2) – a multiple Award-winner and Hall of Fame entrant – is no mean feat, but the new CXN100 accomplishes it in style. It cleverly (or conservatively, depending on your point of view) sticks with the same design and many of the same features, but the new model's innards have been completely redesigned and updated.

It now boasts the latest StreamMagic Gen 4 module (the same used in the MXN10, above) and a new ESS 32-bit DAC chip that means the CXN100 is smarter and better specified than previously. Newer, more efficient components have also been used throughout the CXN's circuitry. The list of streaming features is extensive – you can stream from your local NAS storage, from popular music streaming services, and with every streaming and playing method available (including wired connectivity). 

But it's the CXN100's sound quality that is the real talking point here: it takes huge steps forward in clarity, precision and openness. It's a bold, spacious sound and is more articulate and refined than the outgoing CXN (V2) in many areas. A leaner presentation means the CXN100 majors in attack and agility, with crystal-clear edges to notes bringing everything into crisp detail. We miss a touch of that richness and warmth in the old CXN (V2) that made it relaxing to listen to; the more affordable and smaller MXN10 has that natural warmth to voices, but it can't quite compete with the step-up CXN100's newfound levels of accuracy and space.

Feed it hi-res recordings and partner with equally accomplished amplifier and speakers, and the new CXN100 will perform admirably.

Best premium music streamer

What Hi-Fi? Awards winner. Not the prettiest of music streamers, but you can't argue with the class-leading sound.

Specifications

Sources: UPnP, AirPlay, Chromecast, Tidal, Spotify Connect, Bluetooth aptX HD
Network: Wi-fi, ethernet
Inputs: 2x optical, coax RCA, coax BNC, USB type A
Outputs: Line level, 5-pin DIN, coax BNC
Headphone output: No
Max file resolution: 32-bit/384kHz, DSD128
Dimensions (hwd): 7 x 43 x 30cm
Weight: 6.6kg

Reasons to buy

+
Extracts loads of detail
+
Awesome timing and dynamic
+
Wide range of features/connections

Reasons to avoid

-
No display
-
Needs plenty of running in to sound its best

The Award-winning ND5 XS 2 might be entry-level by Naim's standards, but the sound it produces most definitely isn't. Given a decent amount of time to bed in (Naim products can take a couple of months to really hit their stride), its impressively detailed, dynamic and expressive sound makes it a joy to listen to. 

We said in our review: "Tonally it is even, with the ability to dig deep into bass frequencies with ease and tempering that with rich and insightful mids and treble. It possesses that neutrality required to paint an honest picture of a track, refusing to force its own presentation simply to catch the listener’s ear." 

That neutrality is a testament to the streamer's quality at this premium price. The Naim sounds balanced regardless of source quality or genre, and it handles rhythmic patterns with a kind of maturity and ease that lesser streamers can only dream of. A song's dynamic ebb and flow are as dramatic as they are subtle, while the emotional pull of ballads is conveyed with admirable levels of insight, matched only by the incredibly fun, nimble and finger-snapping beats of hip-hop tracks.

But it's not all about sound. The ND5 XS 2 is packed with features and functionality, too, to cater for all your streaming needs. These include Chromecast, Apple AirPlay, Spotify Connect and Tidal, as well as UPnP compatibility so you can stream from any connected storage, and there are physical connections aplenty too. It also supports files up to 32-bit/384kHz stored on an outboard NAS or computer connected to the same network.

The only thing missing is a display, but it's not vital; you use Naim's own control app (now renamed the Focal & Naim app) to navigate your way around on your smartphone or tablet. Doing so is a breeze; we use the app daily to access our local server and stream music for testing, and can genuinely say that the app really is as straightforward a piece of software as you could hope for. That itself is quite a feat, given the vast array of features it puts at your fingertips, but it's easy to find and play all your music from a variety of sources. All in all, this a terrifically mature and admirably neutral streamer that, if funds allow, should be at the top of your shortlist.

Read the full Naim ND5 XS 2 review

Best music streamer with a CD player

A talented high-quality streamer and CD player in one premium box.

Specifications

Source: CD/SACD, Spotify Connect, Chromecast, Tidal, AirPlay 2, Bluetooth, DLNA, Internet radio
Network: Wi-fi, ethernet
Inputs: Coaxial, optical, 2x USB Type A, USB Type B
Outputs: Coaxial, optical, XLR, line level
Headphone output: 6.3mm headphones
Max file resolution: 32-bit/384kHz, DSD256
Dimensions (hwd): 19.8 x 43 x 40.7cm
Weight: 12.3kg

Reasons to buy

+
Strong sonic performance across all sources
+
Good connectivity
+
Excellent build and finish

Reasons to avoid

-
Can be a little clunky in use
-
Technics app could be slicker

Combining physical media playback with wireless music streaming? This CD/SACD player with network audio streaming smarts is a product for the 21st century. The Technics SL-G700M2 is an excellent and versatile digital source that builds on its five-star predecessor, boasting a wealth of digital connectivity alongside a multitude of streaming options.

The SL-G700M2 remains a beautifully made box, with precision controls and a silky smooth disc drawer – the quality of fit and finish is among the best we have seen at this level. Some niggles from the previous first-generation remains, namely the app software for the streaming control isn't the best we've seen, but it still gets the job done.

The M2 version adds a new USB Type B input and a new DAC, swapping the older AKM AK4497 to an ESS ES9026PRO chip. This change is due to supply issues with the original chip, but incorporating the new DAC resulted in a digital board redesign and an excuse to improve performance even further, as well as update the power supply arrangement.

And we're glad they did. This Technics streamer sounds superb. Its presentation is clear, detailed and insightful, managing to organise the musical information in a cohesive and entertaining way. Its main talent lies in delivering music in a balanced manner, regardless of genre or source. Bold and authoritative when the occasion calls for it; delicate where needed. This same character is present across all digital inputs and when used as a standalone DAC; it can be used with a wide range of partnering kit, too.

Musically engaging and versatile, this Technics SL-G700 is a capable streamer and CD player that covers all bases while being entertaining. Yes, it's possible to get better sound from a separates set up, but this well-conceived combination is hard to beat at this price.

Read the full Technics SL-G700M2 review

Best music streamer for headphones

A premium desktop music streamer that's ideal for discerning headphone users.

Specifications

Sources: AirPlay 2, Bluetooth aptX HD, Chromecast, Spotify Connect, UPnP, Internet radio
Network: Wi-fi, ethernet
Inputs : Line level, coaxial, 2x optical, 2x USB Type A
Outputs: XLR and line level preamp
Headphone output: 6.35mm, balanced XLR, Pentaconn 4.4mm
Max file resolution: 32-bit/384kHz, DSD128
Dimensions (hwd) : 9.5 x 24.5 x 26.5cm
Weight: 7kg

Reasons to buy

+
Several headphone outputs
+
Excellent detail levels
+
Innately musical

Reasons to avoid

-
No support for MQA

The Uniti Atom Headphone Edition is a headphones-based version of the Uniti Atom – the entry-level machine in Naim’s What Hi-Fi? Award-winning Uniti just-add-speakers streaming system range – and like its forebear, this Edition features built-in streaming smarts and connections aplenty.

While the new Atom has been designed with headphones users in mind, it can, of course, also be used as a streaming preamplifier, either connected to a power amp or a pair of active speakers.

At its core is Naim’s streaming platform, a gateway to streaming services (such as Qobuz, Tidal and Spotify), internet radio and DLNA playback, while support for AirPlay 2, built-in Chromecast and Roon builds on that streaming savviness. Analogue and digital connections, including USB, coaxial, optical, RCA and phono, are also onboard for connecting additional sources.

Sonically the Headphone Edition has all the traits we'd expect from the Atom, characterised by impressive insight, dynamism and musicality, but its presentation is even more sophisticated and open, with greater separation of instruments and superb levels of detail. 

It's a bit more niche than most of the streamers on this list, but for anyone looking to unleash the potential of a premium pair of headphones with a multifaceted streaming system, either to use purely as a desktop centrepiece or to also slip into an existing hi-fi system, then this could be ideal.

Read the full Naim Uniti Atom Headphone Edition review

Best high-end music streamer

Linn’s Klimax DSM sets new standards for ultra-high-end music streamers.

Specifications

Source: Bluetooth, Spotify Connect, Tidal, AirPlay, Internet radio
Network: Wi-fi, ethernet
Inputs: Optical, 2x coaxial, balanced XLR, 2x RCA phono, USB Type B, 4x HDMI (AV only), eARC (via HDMI output)
Outputs: Balanced XLR, RCA phono, HDMI (AV only)
Headphone output: No
Max file resolution: 24-bit/384kHz, DSD256
Dimensions (hwd) : 12.6 x 35 x 35cm
Weight: 16.4kg

Reasons to buy

+
Exceptional transparency and detail
+
Impressive dynamics
+
Excellent organisation and control

Reasons to avoid

-
Price puts it out of the reach of most
-
Analogue inputs could sound better

The Linn Klimax DSM AV has a price tag that puts it out of reach for most people, and with that ultra-high-end cost comes a huge amount of expectation. But Linn's latest range-topper not only has an immaculate design but also offers so much sonic insight, clarity and dynamic expression, not to mention a breathtaking level of organisation and transparency. It certainly lives up to its high-end price tag, as well as ambitious design.

There are three variants of the Klimax DSM, the AV version here has four HDMI 2.0 sockets and a single e-ARC-equipped output to that already extensive features list. Specify the optional surround sound module for an extra £1200 ($1,560/AU$2395) and it can decode all the current movie sound formats bar Dolby Atmos and DTS:X. However, if you do want to go down the surround sound route you’ll have to invest heavily into Linn's ecosystem, using either a complete 7.1 active set-up employing the DSM’s stereo analogue outputs and Exakt connections for a hybrid passive/active set up. 

It can access music across your home network from a NAS storage unit or stream using Tidal, Qobuz or Spotify Connect. There’s also Bluetooth (version 4.2) and AirPlay connectivity and it can work as a Roon endpoint.

Rather than being a mere streamer, the DSM is more of a streaming preamplifier. As well as the raft of HDMI inputs, it has USB Type B, optical and a pair of coaxials (in BNC form) and analogue equivalents in Balanced XLR and single-ended RCA (x2) form. 

The big technology highlight is the introduction of the Organik digital-to-analogue circuitry, Linn’s first in-house DAC design that has been developed from first principles using the company’s three decades' worth of digital experience. 

The result? This is an exceptional product that raises the benchmark for the high-end streamers category. If you have the funds and system to accommodate this Linn streamer, we applaud your luck and fortune, and highly recommend you take the plunge.

Read the full Linn Klimax DSM AV review

Also consider

Eversolo DMP-A6: We can't praise this newcomer enough for its slick interface and overall design. Whether you're using the organised, intuitive smartphone control app or the on-screen touch display (which is large, colourful and crisp), the DMP-A6 is responsive and a joy to use. It has a wealth of streaming abilities, a variety of connections and even has on-board storage. While it could do with more natural warmth and greater subtlety, it sounds clear, solid and punchy – a great alternative to the class leaders.

Bluesound Node (2021): A former Award-winner, this compact box offers ample streaming options and exciting sound for the money. An alternative to Cambridge Audio MXN10, the Bluesound uses the BluOS app and platform (and can be linked to other BluOS-compatible products for multiroom), has an HDMI eARC input and a headphone jack. Sound-wise, it's full of energy and delivers low-level dynamics with appreciable subtlety.

Naim NSS 333: It's not quite as mega-expensive as the Linn, but this new Naim streamer from its latest high-end 300 series is one of the most musically satisfying listens we've heard for this category. It sounds intrinsically right, and its organised, articulate and dynamic way with all kinds of music is to be applauded.

How to choose the best music streamer for you

Music streamers are a standalone component of a dedicated hi-fi set-up. But while other hi-fi separates such as a turntable or CD player just have a simple job to do, a music streamer (or network audio streamer) has to manage many different wireless sources as well as be able to play music files from local storage on your network. 

Most of the selections on this list support the vast majority of hi-res music formats, though the upper limit can vary between 24-bit/96kHz PCM files for more basic products and up to 32-bit/768kHz for those that aim to push the boundary. We wouldn’t get too hung up on the numbers, though, as the vast majority of music isn’t available in those more extreme file types. CD quality is 16-bit/44.1kHz, and a capability of 24-bit/192kHz should be more than enough to meet the needs of most audiophiles. 

Connectivity-wise, streamers can boast AirPlay 2, Bluetooth, Spotify Connect, UPnP compatibility, and physical connections. Regardless of the model, you should also be able to play local music files from a connected NAS drive and play thousands of internet radio stations. You'll also be able to play from your favourite music streaming services – at least Spotify and quite probably higher-quality alternatives such as Tidal or Qobuz are built-in.

Bluetooth is almost always included, and if it’s the more capable and better-quality aptX HD form, then all the better. Most audio streamers will also have digital inputs, so alongside playing music files from a USB stick or flash drive, you’ll usually be able to feed in optical and coaxial digital feeds too, making the streamer something of a digital hub for your system.

To get the best user experience, you’ll really need a smartphone or tablet to control your streamer. Using your streamer's app is the best way to navigate large music libraries, swap between sources and the quickest way of making playlists. If that doesn't appeal, you may want to look for models with a large display and traditional remote control.

Since we’re talking about practicalities, it’s worth mentioning that the first thing any music streamer needs is a stable home internet network, and you need to decide whether to connect the steamer directly with an Ethernet cable or go wireless. Going wire-free is appealing, as it makes things easier and tidier, and provided your network is stable, should work fine for many people. If you can, though, stick with wired because it gives a more stable connection and deliver the best sound quality, making everything go more smoothly over long-term use.

Price-wise, as with all things hi-fi, streamers can vary hugely, and how much you can expect to pay depends on the rest of your set-up. We would suggest that spending broadly the same as your amplifier would be a decent place to start, though it always pays to be flexible to get the right one. 

Whatever your budget, music streamers are a great way to upgrade your sonic experience from a simple wireless speaker, especially if you want to give your digital music collection its proper due. If you love the convenience but want better sound and have the room and budget to accommodate a stereo system, a hi-fi streamer is the way to go.

Almost regardless of which music streamer you buy, you will gain access to an astonishing range of music – but pick with care, and it will make listening to that music all the more enjoyable.

How we test music streamers

Every music streamer that we review and rate at What Hi-Fi? is tested in our dedicated, acoustically treated testing facilities in Reading and London, where our in-house team of experts put every new product through our rigorous testing process. 

What Hi-Fi? is all about comparative testing, so every music streamer we review is listened to and tested against the current leader in its field and price point to gauge how it compares to the best-in-class competition. We keep our five-star and Award-winning streamers in our on-site stockroom so they're always at hand for comparisons with new products. For all music streamer reviews, we compare streaming smarts, specs and connectivity, and also use them over a number of days or even weeks to test how seamless they are to use in everyday listening.

We always ensure we spend plenty of time with a new music streamer, making sure they are fully run in before we begin testing and trying them with different partnering equipment, using various file formats, streaming services and music genres as part of our testing process. We also test every connection, both wired and wi-fi streaming – from AirPlay and Bluetooth to playing downloaded hi-res tracks from our NAS storage, and trying out the USB, digital and analogue connections. We also test how easy the streamer is to use with the accompanying app, remote and on-screen display (if it has one), and keep an eye (and ear) out for any connection dropouts.

All our review verdicts are agreed upon by the team as a whole rather than a single reviewer, to avoid individual subjectivity and bias. There is never any input from the brand, the PR or our commercial teams on any of our reviews or the final verdict. We are proud to have delivered unbiased, independent reviews for nearly five decades, and that won't change any time soon. 

You can read more about how we test and review products on What Hi-Fi? here.

FAQ

Are music streamers worth it?

It depends on how you listen to music, and how versatile you want your system to be, but on the whole, yes it is worth it if the majority of your listening is digital/wireless-based.

On the whole, music streamers offer a wealth of features – both wireless streaming and wired connectivity – that many other kit simply doesn't. If you listen to music or radio across a variety of online platforms, subscribe to more than one streaming service, or have a digital library full of music files – a music streamer makes it easy to access all these different sources from one place. The best music streamers will deliver all your music in the best sound quality possible too, as well as support native playback of high-res file formats.

What is the difference between a music server and a music streamer?

A music server is a combination of file storage and streaming abilities, useful for organising, assigning/editing metadata and browsing your digital music library. Products like Melco's N100 or N10/2-S38 are prime examples of powerful, high-quality music servers, while Roon's Nucleus is another option. It can come with its own app, its own network connection and even sometimes has CD-ripping powers, as the Bluesound Vault 2i or the Naim Uniti Core. It's expensive but a high-quality way of building your digital system.

Music streamers don't tend to have built-in storage, and you'll need an external server, NAS or hard drive for music file storage, which a streamer can access through wired or wireless means. Music streamers do have more versatile streaming features and usually include a built-in DAC (which music servers don't always have). A server is most useful if you have a large, dedicated collection of downloaded hi-res or DSD files, while a streamer is best if you listen to online streaming platforms more frequently.

For more information, read our guide to building your own digital music library

Recent updates

  • May 2024: Added a new FAQ section.
  • March 2024: Added Also Consider section to offer more buying options.
  • October 2023: Added WiiM Pro Plus following five-star review and Award win. Highlighted products that won 2023 What Hi-Fi? Best Buy awards.
  • July 2023: Added Cambridge Audio MXN10 following five-star review.

MORE:

Spotify, Tidal, Apple Music – what's the best music streaming service for you?

MP3, AAC, WAV, FLAC: all the audio file formats explained

Here's a list of our best test tracks to trial your hi-fi system

How to build your own digital music library

Kashfia Kabir
Hi-Fi and Audio Editor

Kashfia is the Hi-Fi and Audio Editor of What Hi-Fi? and first joined the brand over 10 years ago. During her time in the consumer tech industry, she has reviewed hundreds of products (including speakers, amplifiers and headphones), been to countless trade shows across the world and fallen in love with hi-fi kit much bigger than her. In her spare time, Kash can be found tending to an ever-growing houseplant collection and shooing her cat Jolene away from spinning records.

With contributions from
  • londonguy
    the prices of streamers are ridiculous. Logitech did it brilliantly at a fraction of the prices these are going for.
    Reply
  • Dan Sung
    I think the Audiolab at the top of this list is a very reasonable price for what is a really solid piece of hi-fi kit.
    Reply
  • LeighHughes
    londonguy said:
    the prices of streamers are ridiculous. Logitech did it brilliantly at a fraction of the prices these are going for.
    Seven grand for a mandatory power supply is simply taking your customers for a ride. It's a lump of iron, wrapped in copper winding, together with other not overly sophisticated componentry, in a plain box. Ridiculous indeed, Naim!
    Reply
  • Mr HiFi
    What! No Linn Streamers. Have the What HiFi reviewers gone deaf or fallen out with Linn? Surely the Selekt, Akurate or Klimax deserves a place in this list. I have a Majik DSi Network Streamer. It is at least as good if not better than half the ones on this list and it has a superb power amplifier built in, for free!
    Reply
  • Sverker
    Mr HiFi said:
    What! No Linn Streamers.
    Since the heading says ”wireless streamers”, I think only Selekt (and the brand new Majik DSM/4) qualifies. But I totally agree re your verdict on the Majik DS-I. It's great!
    Reply
  • theo23rd
    londonguy said:
    the prices of streamers are ridiculous. Logitech did it brilliantly at a fraction of the prices these are going for.
    What product by Logitech are you referring to?
    Reply
  • theo23rd
    Mr HiFi said:
    What! No Linn Streamers. Have the What HiFi reviewers gone deaf or fallen out with Linn? Surely the Selekt, Akurate or Klimax deserves a place in this list. I have a Majik DSi Network Streamer. It is at least as good if not better than half the ones on this list and it has a superb power amplifier built in, for free!
    The list I see includes the Selekt.
    Reply
  • danielbower
    Does anyone know (or is it possible to update the post) which of these streamers are compatible with Tidal Connect?

    I am in the market for a streamer, but keen to keep using the Tidal app as the controller.

    Cheers!
    Reply
  • danielbower
    I meant Tidal Connect specifically. Apologies for the initial typo.
    Reply
  • londonguy
    theo23rd said:
    What product by Logitech are you referring to?
    Squeezebox touch for example
    Reply