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Qobuz talks Amazon Music HD, 3D audio, new features and more

Qobuz talks Amazon Music HD, 3D audio, new features and more
(Image credit: Qobuz)

If any music service can claim to be a veteran of high-quality streaming, it is Qobuz. The French streaming (and download) service was the first of its kind to offer CD-quality (16-bit) streams and, in 2015, it became a primary patron for hi-res (24-bit) streams. So while Amazon Music HD has only been going five months, Qobuz has been hi-res streaming for five years.

Amazon's entry into the hi-res streaming market – making it the first of the 'big three' (Apple, Amazon and Spotify) to go there – is a significant one. With Amazon Music HD now a direct competitor to Qobuz, is it game over for smaller streaming services? Or will its arrival in the market spread the hi-res message louder and further than Qobuz ever could?

“We knew it was coming," says Benoît Rébus, Qobuz's Head of Global Innovation and Partnerships. "It is never good to be alone, so we were waiting for big players with a loud voice and marketing money to bring the benefit of artist endorsement. We only have a little voice.

"Since Amazon’s launch, we’ve done nothing but grow. People are realising that there’s something else on the market – they’re being told that what they currently get at Spotify isn’t hi-res at all."

But with Amazon’s greater subscriber reach and resources, not to mention its more affordable monthly cost (£14.99/$14.99), Qobuz has had to react.

The elephant in the room: price

Qobuz recently announced that it was going to ditch MP3s altogether: "It has been 20 years, it’s time to move on," says Rébus. Qobuz’s Premium (MP3) and HiFi (CD-quality) subscriptions will soon be gone, leaving just the Studio (£25/$25 per month) and Sublime+ (£250/$300 per year) packages. 

Both offer access to a CD-quality and hi-res catalogue, but the latter is an annual-payment-only option that also offers discounts to its download store. Meanwhile, in the US, Qobuz has relaunched with just one competitively priced tier.

"Our issue was price, so we reduced it with our Studio Premiere plan," says Rébus. "We thought four tiers were too many – Qobuz customers come here for hi-res, not MP3s. The beauty of the US relaunch is that now it’s one single subscription of $15 per month, which is below Tidal and Deezer," says Rébus.

"Before reducing the price, we had to make sure we could keep our margins, so we talked to the labels and this new price allows us to do that. Now, we have to deal with each label in each country, so it takes time… but our interest is in democratising hi-res." However, until it can achieve this, Qobuz remains pricier than its hi-res streaming rivals in other markets.

Qobuz is also attempting to bring down costs by introducing a Family Plan. "Our customers tend to accumulate services: Qobuz for themselves, and maybe Spotify or Apple Music for the kids," says Rébus. "But with Family Plan, we think parents are more likely to get rid of Spotify, because something better exists,” he adds.

Differentiation: catalogue, downloads, partners

But, as our recent review of the service noted, Qobuz won't be perfect for everyone. While it claims to have the biggest library of 24-bit tracks among its competitors – almost double Tidal's number – we would often find albums on Tidal, Spotify, Apple Music and Deezer that weren't available on Qobuz at all.

Rébus acknowledges the shortcomings of its service, saying: “We differentiate ourselves with our catalogue. Others are pushing mainstream music, whereas we try to push emerging artists and not just pop music.” Arguably that's what its subscriber base, largely comprising music enthusiasts aged over 40, wants.

Despite a decline in the popularity of downloading music, Rébus claims that Qobuz's download service, Sublime+, is doing well. Downloading hasn't been totally neglected, not least as Qobuz expects downloaders to move to streaming eventually.

Qobuz is currently working with partners such as Aurender and Bluesound to find ways of improving the download experience. One possible feature could be to enable automatic downloading of any track or album purchased on your smartphone onto any connected servers you have at home.

Qobuz prides itself on its 24-bit ecosystem: with streams widely supported across the hi-fi industry, most recently by Naim and Cambridge Audio. Another one of Qobuz's unique selling points is that its catalogue supports albums with extended metadata and reading material, such as booklets and articles.

“With Amazon you get the quality of course, but that’s kind of it,” says Rébus.

Staying buoyant

Amazon has committed itself to 3D audio (Dolby Atmos Music and Sony 360 Reality Audio), voice control (Alexa) and AI search features – all features Qobuz has an eye on in order to grow the business.

“We were supposed to be a launch partner of Sony, but had some delays – we’re a small company that has to choose its priorities. It has opened up a new market... there’s the impression hi-res is for geeks and audiophiles and you need a super expensive system, whereas with [3D audio] you can just use regular headphones.”

“It’s a good opportunity for us, but the catalogue is limited to around 2,000 tracks. We have to make sure it’s not only about Drake and The Weeknd, but also our style of artist.

“Voice [control] is tricky because we’re catching up. We will take small steps and start [integration] with 'play my favourites', for example. Now that the US is our second market, Alexa makes sense because they’re very proactive. Amazon has more manageable tools than Google… whereas Amazon is more self-service.

"We’re also thinking about our own voice assistant. We need to address Alexa and Google customers, but there are limitations in terms of languages, audio quality and codecs," says Rébus. "Alexa can’t play hi-res content… well, Amazon can, but we can’t. As a brand, it’s important to have direct contact with our customers. We want to remain independent," he adds.

Qobuz is also aiming to make music easier to discover: "The more they listen, the longer they'll stay," says Rébus. "All our recommendations are human recommendations – our users love it. But we’re developing our own internal AI solution based on a collaborative algorithm. 

"We wouldn’t drop hand-picked recommendations – it’s important to keep that alive, and we also want to leverage the Qobuz community, so that users can recommend songs to others. In 2020, we will start releasing weekly automated playlists, based on what they've been listening to."

Qobuz is clearly ambitious, then, aware that it needs to be to survive now that big players are joining the game. It's confident the new features on its 2020 (and beyond) roadmap, combined with the service's core differentiators next to its increasing number of competitors, will keep it afloat. And as hi-res streaming is building momentum, there are undoubtedly many, us included, who hope Qobuz can continue riding it.

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  • Niallivm
    Qobuz Hi Res is $15/m in the US ($12.50/m if you sign up for a year).
    The same service in the UK is $33/m.
    I'd love to support them take on the big boys but a European company fleecing their European customers like that is indefensible
    Reply
  • Rookie
    Please come to Australia ✌️
    Reply
  • bristollinnet
    A truly excellent product, but if Qobuz want me back as a subscriber then they MUST be more UK price competitive with Amazon Music HD.
    Reply
  • Brantome
    “Alexa can’t play hi-res content… well, Amazon can, but we can’t.”

    Strictry speaking, Alexa only plays the full range of hi-res content to the Echo Studio - it caps output at 24/44.1 to any other device, maybe even the echo link/amp, even if the output device supports up to 24/192.

    Frankly, Amazon’s HD service has been poorly implemented thus far...
    Reply
  • msee
    Niallivm said:
    Qobuz Hi Res is $15/m in the US ($12.50/m if you sign up for a year).
    The same service in the UK is $33/m.
    I'd love to support them take on the big boys but a European company fleecing their European customers like that is indefensible
    Disgraceful, I use to subscribe to Qobuz until I found that the new price tier only applied to the USA! So i figured if that is how they treat their loyal European (UK) subscribers then I am off to sign up with one of the other hi-res streaming services.
    Reply
  • mwinter
    msee said:
    Disgraceful, I use to subscribe to Qobuz until I found that the new price tier only applied to the USA! So i figured if that is how they treat their loyal European (UK) subscribers then I am off to sign up with one of the other hi-res streaming services.
    This will change. Deezer introduced their lower price in the US first to much wailing gnashing of teeth. They have now realigned their pricing.
    Reply
  • msee
    mwinter said:
    This will change. Deezer introduced their lower price in the US first to much wailing gnashing of teeth. They have now realigned their pricing.
    I hope so. Qobuz content and recommendations are more aligned with my musical tastes, however it is not acceptable when so many companies (not just Qobuz) take UK customers for granted and treat us like mugs : (
    Reply
  • dachad
    I'm new to the high quality audio and HiFi stuff. I came across good sound and the world of DACs and toys rather by accident. I bought a Scarlett Solo interface to plug my new Telecaster into my computer, and plugged that into a $100 pair of small studio monitors. The difference of stock audio was amazing. I've since added a bunch of toys.

    The challenge I think, for Qobuz & Tidal's HiFi, is the abysmal state of everything else. Good audio on iOS is a mess, with Apple seemingly actively trying to limit audio quality to iTunes' level of trash. Android's hit or miss, depending on the device. Bluetooth, Airplay 2 and Chromecast have varying levels compatibility issues that make it difficult to get a system where everything works at its peak.

    Qobuz sounds incredible on a DragonFly or other DAC connected to an adapter, with a $30 pair of BLON's, ($160 -$230 worth of stuff), but not nearly as great with a $300 pair of Beats, AirPods or Sony's. Sounds 10x better on a good DAC and amp over good speakers.

    Amazon really only supports the Studio & Links with HD & 360. I haven't heard any of the hardware integrations yet, but I'm unimpressed with UltraHD on iOS & Mac clients.

    Qobuz still wins. The French had to finally win something...
    Reply
  • HisDudeness
    Niallivm said:
    Qobuz Hi Res is $15/m in the US ($12.50/m if you sign up for a year).
    The same service in the UK is $33/m.
    I'd love to support them take on the big boys but a European company fleecing their European customers like that is indefensible

    I cannot agree more with you on this point. I have tried Tidal, which forces the music of Jay-Z's buddies on me, so this didn't cut it for me. I'm very anxious to have hires content available in addition to my Spotify subscription, but Qobuz's price point in the EU is ridiculous and frankly a rip-off compared to the price in the US.
    Reply
  • Brantome
    Where in the EU are you? Qobuz has been £14.99 in the uk for a while
    http://www.qobuz.com/gb-en/music/streaming/offers?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI7YiN24H86AIVmLPtCh3neQwJEAAYASACEgLED_D_BwE&qbzc=st-m&qbzs=adwords
    Reply