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Best 55-inch TVs 2022: smart, 4K, HDR and OLED TVs

Best 55-inch TVs Buying Guide: Welcome to What Hi-Fi?'s guide to the best 55-inch 4K TVs you can buy in 2022.

55-inch TVs are the sweet spot for many people – more visually impressive than smaller sets, more able to fit in a tight space than giant, big-screen TVs. And it's an increasingly popular size now that more and more of us are enjoying 4K content.

Take the time to make sure your choice of TV has the connections you need and the feature support to watch your favourite streaming services. You can rest assured all the below sets deliver great pictures, while some come with upgraded TV speakers that offer high-quality sound, too.

It's a great time to upgrade your home entertainment experience and, for many people, a 55-inch TV will be the optimum size. If that's you, read on, because we've trimmed down our list of the best TVs to bring you a specific run down of the best 55-inch TV sets currently available.

How do we choose the best 55-inch TVs?

Here at What Hi-Fi? we review hundreds of products every year. So how do we come to our review verdicts? And why can you trust them? The What Hi-Fi? team has more than 100 years experience of reviewing, testing and writing about consumer electronics.

We have state-of-the-art testing facilities in London, Reading and Bath, where our team of expert reviewers do all of our testing. This gives us complete control over the testing process, ensuring consistency. All products are tested in comparison with rival products in the same price category, and all review verdicts are agreed upon by the team as a whole rather than an individual reviewer.

From all of our reviews, we choose the best products to feature in our Best Buys. That's why if you buy one of the products recommended below, or on any other Best Buy page, you can be assured you're getting a What Hi-Fi? approved product.

Best TVs: Sony XR-55A80J

(Image credit: Sony)

1. Sony XR-55A80J

Sony’s step-down OLED might just be the TV of the year

Specifications

Screen size: 55in (also available in 65in, 83in)
Type: OLED
Backlight: not applicable
Resolution: 4K
HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision
Operating system: Google TV
HDMI inputs: 4
ARC/eARC: eARC
Optical output: Yes
Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 71 x 123 x 5.3cm

Reasons to buy

+
Super-sharp and detailed
+
Punchy and vibrant but natural
+
Superb motion handling

Reasons to avoid

-
Incomplete HDMI 2.1 feature set
-
Missing UK catch-up apps

We rate products on a performance-per-pound basis. That’s always been the What Hi-Fi? way. We’re not looking simply for the absolute best product in each category, as that would invariably involve recommending one of the most expensive products in each category; we’re looking for the best bang for your buck. The product that best balances performance, features and price.

That isn’t to say that we’re averse to recommending a premium product when it justifies its high price, and that’s why we were delighted to bestow the full five stars upon Sony’s A90J flagship OLED when we reviewed it a little earlier in the year. Simply put, it’s one of the best TVs you can currently buy.

It's not be the best performance-per-pound TV you can buy, though, because this A80J beats it on that metric. This step-down model in Sony’s new OLED range certainly isn’t quite as good as its flagship sibling but, by offering most of what makes the A90J great at a much more competitive price, it’s turned out to be a real winner.

Best 55-inch TVs: TCL 55RP620K

(Image credit: TCL)

2. TCL 55RP620K

This Roku-powered TV is great for the money.

Specifications

Screen size: 55in (also available in 43in, 50in and 65in)
Type: LCD
Backlight: LED edge lighting
Resolution: 4K
HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision
Operating system: Roku
HDMI inputs: 4
ARC/eARC: ARC
Optical output: Yes
Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 72 x 123 x 8.4cm

Reasons to buy

+
Complex, natural colours
+
Good contrast control
+
Superb smart platform

Reasons to avoid

-
Short on dark detail
-
No motion processing
-
Sound lacks weight

While this TCL obviously isn't outright better than the OLEDs and QLEDs on this list, on a performance-per-pound basis it's very hard to beat. The integrated Roku platform means the set is packed with streaming apps and is very easy to use, and the performance is much better than you'd expect from a set costing so little.

Compared to most TVs at the budget end of the spectrum, the RP620K produces richer, more vibrant and truer colours, better blacks, and more convincing contrast and texture. There's no real motion processing on board, but the native handling is decent.

While not exactly cinematic, the integrated speaker system is clear and controlled, so will do the job if you're unwilling or unable to add a soundbar.

All told, this TCL is a very solid buy. It might not be the AV equivalent of fine dining but it’s more sophisticated than the chips and gravy of Hisense’s even cheaper Roku TV – and just as tasty. If you want a big TV on a budget, there's currently nothing better.

Read the full TCL 55RP620K review

Best 55-inch TVs: Sony XR-55A90J

(Image credit: Future / Leonardo, Amazon Prime)

3. Sony XR-55A90J

It's very expensive, but if you want the best, the A90J is it

Specifications

Screen size: 55in (also available in 65in, 83in)
Type: OLED
Backlight: not applicable
Resolution: 4K
HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision
Operating system: Google TV
HDMI inputs: 4
ARC/eARC: eARC
Optical output: Yes
Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 71 x 122 x 4.1cm

Reasons to buy

+
Outstanding picture quality
+
Superb motion handling
+
Impressive sound

Reasons to avoid

-
No VRR (yet), buggy 4K@120Hz
-
Missing UK catch-up apps
-
Expensive

While Sony’s OLEDs are highly regarded, it’s typically hard to justify buying one over a rival LG. Historically, the Sony has a more authentic picture and better sound but is also a step behind on features and usability – and at least a level or two more expensive.

But what if Sony could produce a TV with most of those previously missing features, a more satisfying user experience, and a unique high-quality movie streaming app, all while raising the picture and sound quality to even greater heights? That's exactly what the company's done with the A90J.

In performance terms, the Sony A90J is an absolute stunner. It takes OLED picture performance to new, thrilling levels while maintaining the authenticity for which Sony is justifiably renowned. It also sounds significantly better than all of the other TVs you might be considering. The new Google TV operating system means the user experience is better than that of any pre-2021 Sony TV, too, and the exclusive Bravia Core streaming service is a genuine value-added feature.

Hardcore gamers might want to take a wait-and-see approach, though, as the set doesn't yet support VRR (an update has been promised but not dated) and we found the 4K@120Hz support a little buggy. However, if movies and TV shows are your priority and you have a big budget, we haven’t tested a better television than the Sony A90J.

Do check out the A80J at the top of this before handing over your money, though, as it offers much of (but not all) the A90J's excellence at a significantly lower price.

We've tested the A90J in its 55-inch and 65-inch sizes. It's also available as an 83-inch model, which we've not yet reviewed. You'll see the latest, lowest prices available for each version below.

Read the full Sony XR-55A90J review

Read the full Sony XR-65A90J review

Best TVs: Samsung QE55QN94A

(Image credit: Samsung)

4. Samsung QE55QN94A

Top Neo QLED performance with a cheeky little discount

Specifications

Screen size: 55in (also available in 50in, 65in, 75in, 85in)
Type: QLED
Backlight: Mini LED
Resolution: 4K
HDR formats supported: HLG, HDR10, HDR10+
Operating system: Tizen
HDMI inputs: 4
ARC/eARC: eARC
Optical output: Yes
Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 71 x 123 x 2.6cm

Reasons to buy

+
Terrifically bright, punchy picture
+
Superb detail and sharpness
+
Excellent TV operating system

Reasons to avoid

-
Light control not perfect
-
Good, not great, sound
-
No Dolby Vision

Samsung’s first flush of Neo QLED TVs has been nothing short of revolutionary to date. The extra-fine level of lighting control that mini LED brings has put LCD’s high peak brightness to sophisticated use. It’s added a care with contrast that’s led to a more nuanced on-screen image, with a more solid, three-dimensional depth than ever before. We’ve every reason to expect the same from the QN94A.

If ‘QN94A’ seems a bit of an odd number, that’s to indicate that there’s only a small difference between it and Samsung’s top 4K TV for the year, the QN95A (below). The QN94A TV is identical apart from missing out on the One Connect box – a discrete box that houses all of the QN95A's connections, including power.

The difference in price between the QN94A and QN95A isn’t huge, but if you’re not interested in the One Connect box and are content with just one HDMI 2.1-certified socket, it’s worth saving that little bit of money. Picture quality is excellent regardless of which you choose and the sound isn’t bad at all. An OLED might look better in some scenes but there’s something quite addictive about the brightness of this set. Its super-contrasty and punchy HDR delivery is ever so more-ish. 

There’s still no Dolby Vision support but you’ll be getting so much from HDR10 alone that it will hardly be on your mind. This is a great TV and a terrific buy at this price.

We tested the QN95A in its 65-inch size. It's also available as a 50-inch, 65-inch, 75-inch and 85-inch model. We've not yet reviewed these versions but you'll see the latest, lowest prices below.

Read the full Samsung QE55QN94A review

Best TVs: Panasonic TX-55JZ1500B

(Image credit: Panasonic / Nine Perfect Strangers, Amazon Prime)

5. Panasonic TX-55JZ1500B

Panasonic’s flagship picture is now untethered from its flagship sound

Specifications

Screen size: 55in (also available in 48in, 65in)
Type: OLED
Backlight: not applicable
Resolution: 4K
HDR formats supported: HDR10, HDR10+, HLG, Dolby Vision
Operating system: My Home Screen 6.0
HDMI inputs: 4
ARC/eARC: eARC
Optical output: Yes
Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 71 x 123 x 6.9cm

Reasons to buy

+
Beautifully rich but natural picture
+
Excellent detail and definition
+
Weighty sound

Reasons to avoid

-
Occasional lack of sonic clarity
-
Missing some big apps
-
Expensive

Panasonic has embraced the OLED era in a wholehearted, star-crossed lovers-style, producing some of the best TVs of the last few years. But, for the last couple of those, the company’s flagship picture has been tethered to its flagship sound.

Whether you rate that flagship sound or not (we did in 2019 but didn’t in 2020), the fact remains that in buying Panasonic’s best picture, you’re also forced into paying for something that you might not use because you’ve already got (or are getting) a dedicated sound system.

For 2021, though, Panasonic changed tack so that its best picture is no longer exclusive to this year’s 2000-series models but is also a feature of the 1500-series, seen here in 55-inch, TX-55JZ1500B guise.

The result is an excellent TV that makes Panasonic’s top picture performance more affordable than ever before. Its rich but natural colours are a particular highlight, and it's brilliantly detailed and sharp, with excellent motion handling to boot.

It’s still an expensive set, though, and the Sony A90J and A80J (both above), which are a good deal pricier and cheaper respectively, should both also be considered before you settle on the JZ1500B. We can well imagine that plenty of people will still choose the Panasonic’s beautifully vibrant performance even after seeing the very best that Sony has to offer.

We tested the JZ1500B in its 55-inch size. It's also available as a 48-inch and 65-inch model. We've not yet reviewed those versions but you'll see the latest, lowest prices for them below.

Read the full Panasonic TX-55JZ1500B review

Best 55-inch TVs: LG OLED55CX

(Image credit: LG / Paatal Lok, Amazon Prime)

6. LG OLED55CX

This core model from LG’s 2020 OLED TV range is a hugely capable all-rounder.

Specifications

Screen size: 55in (also available in 48in, 65in and 77in)
Type: OLED
Backlight: not applicable
Resolution: 4K
HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision
Operating system: webOS
HDMI inputs: 4
ARC/eARC: eARC
Optical output: Yes
Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 71 x 123 x 4.7cm

Reasons to buy

+
Picture is exciting but natural
+
Improved motion and dark detail
+
More future-proofed than most

Reasons to avoid

-
Missing UK catch-up apps

The C-series tends to represent the sweet spot in each year's LG OLED range, and so it proved in 2020.

The CX's performance is superb. The perfect blacks and near-perfect viewing angles we're used to from OLED, combine with bright, punchy whites and vibrant but natural colours. LG's motion processing improved for 2020, too (although it's better still on 2021 sets), and its OLEDs continue to impress in terms of upscaling 1080p and standard-def content.

On top of all that you get certified HDMI 2.1 sockets that support next-gen features such as eARC (Enhanced Audio Return Channel), HFR (High Frame Rate), ALLM (Auto Low Latency Mode), and all current formats of VRR (Variable Refresh Rate). Those last two features will be of particular appeal to those gamers looking to upgrade to the PS5 or Xbox Series X.

One fairly big downside for UK buyers is that some of the UK's terrestrial catch-up apps are still missing from LG's 2020 smart platform (although BBC iPlayer has thankfully now been added). You can obviously add these fairly easily and inexpensively by adding a streamer such as the Amazon Fire TV Stick 4K, but you really shouldn't have to.

Read the full LG OLED55CX review

Tom Parsons has been writing about TV, AV and hi-fi products (not to mention plenty of other 'gadgets' and even cars) for over 15 years. He began his career as What Hi-Fi?'s Staff Writer and is now the TV and AV Editor. In between, he worked as Reviews Editor and then Deputy Editor at Stuff, and over the years has had his work featured in publications such as T3, The Telegraph and Louder. He's also appeared on BBC News, BBC World Service, BBC Radio 4 and Sky Swipe. In his spare time Tom is a runner and gamer.

  • Friesiansam
    What Hi-Fi? said:
    1. Sony KD-55A8This 2020 OLED is the best 55 inch TV we've tested.

    4. Panasonic TX-55GZ2000BThe best performing OLED TV we’ve tested so far.
    One of those must be wrong.
    Reply
  • no-name-123
    Friesiansam said:
    One of those must be wrong.

    Which one 'must be wrong' what do you recomend instead?
    Reply
  • busb
    no-name-123 said:
    Which one 'must be wrong' what do you recomend instead?
    Friesiansam said:
    One of those must be wrong.
    Not necessarily - the Panasonic was reviewed a year earlier than the Sony.
    Reply
  • Ken Robbins
    Hi, can anyone recommend a 55 inch TV that won't break the bank, I have sky q and a boose sound system and a dad player that obviously needs connecting , looking for a really good picture quality
    Reply
  • Ken Robbins said:
    Hi, can anyone recommend a 55 inch TV that won't break the bank, I have sky q and a boose sound system and a dad player that obviously needs connecting , looking for a really good picture quality
    This one is a great TV at £1000 with discount code:

    https://www.richersounds.com/tv-projectors/qled-tvs/samsung-qe55q95tc.html
    Reply
  • Mr. C Nation
    It bears repeating so I will. No TV should get a 5* rating if it cannot deliver the full range of content from the major content channels. To put 'lacks catch-up apps' and then give 5* is to entirely miss the point of a TV which has only one function - to deliver content.

    TVs have no intrinsic value. They are simply devices to deliver content. No matter how thin, how deep the blacks, how 'engaging' the sound - if it won't deliver BBCiPlayer, for example - at least one * off. Actually, I'd give it no more than 2*.

    "Fantastic technical achievment by XX but ineligable for our recomendations because it lacks major content providers"
    Come on W.H-F. Rattle the lock of the 'lacks apps' mob'.
    Reply