Skip to main content

Sony 2022 TV lineup: everything you need to know

Sony 2022 TV lineup
(Image credit: Sony)

2022 is a year of firsts for Sony's TV lineup: not only is the company launching its (and the world's) first QD-OLED TV, it's also launching its first MiniLED models and its first 42-inch OLED TV.

On top of those firsts are a number of standard OLED and LCD models, plus improvements to the company's XR processor, upgraded gaming features (VRR at launch!) and an Xbox Kinect-style smart camera that may or may not be a little late to the pandemic party.

Towards the bottom of this page you'll find the full Sony 2022 TV range breakdown but first, let's break down some of the broader technical highlights.

The world's first QD-OLED TV

Sony XR-65A95K

(Image credit: Sony)

It feels like we've been waiting for the first QD-OLED TVs for ages now, but the first one has now been officially announced and will be arriving within the next few months. Somewhat surprisingly, given that Samsung is the manufacturer behind the new QD-OLED panels, it's Sony that's announced and is expected to launch its QD-OLED TV first, although the A95K (for that is its name) could come later in the year than the other models in Sony's 2022 TV range.

The A95K could turn out to be a little less expensive than expected, though, with a psuedo-leak suggesting that the 55-inch model could launch at $3000 and the 65-inch model at $4000. That would make each model just $200 more expensive than the launch price of the equivalent A90J OLED in 2021. That would suggest UK prices of around £2900 (around AU$5500) and £3700 (around AU$7000) respectively. While far from cheap, that would make the A95K a bit more attainable than the cutting-edge nature of the tech might suggest.

But what is QD-OLED? We've got a full QD-OLED explainer if you'd like the full lowdown but, in brief, it's a new type of panel that combines Quantum Dot and OLED technology to create a potential best-of-both-worlds picture performance: the perfect blacks and flawless contrast control of OLED with the colour vibrancy of Quantum Dots. QD-OLED TVs should go brighter than standard OLEDs, too, though not as bright as premium backlit TVs such as Samsung's QLED models.

Sony's A95K also apparently benefits from a heat diffusion sheet that distributes heat more effectively, and temperature distribution mapping that apparently helps prevent image retention. Sony says that these features, plus the Cognitive Processor XR's XR Triluminous Max feature, help maximise the potential of the QD-OLED panel.

8K and 4K MiniLED TVs

While some manufacturers (most notably Samsung) launched MiniLED TVs in 2021, Sony has waited until 2022 to get in on the act with its Z9K (8K) and X95K (4K) models.

As other manufacturers have before, Sony is talking up the better contrast and higher peak brightness of MiniLED over standard Full Array LED backlighting. Light is much more focused to where it’s needed and there's less blooming, which can be particularly noticeable when viewing a TV off-axis.

Sony also talks about how hard it is to drive MiniLED well. The big problem is apparently avoiding making the shapes of the zones of the backlight visible. Bright objects against a black background sometimes suffer from visibly jaggy edges of light thanks to the brightness of the MiniLEDs and the straight edges of their zones.

XR Backlight Master Drive, which is essentially an algorithm powered by the XR processor, apparently controls the backlight very intelligently and adjust and aligns the brightness of the LEDs as required. The idea is to maximise brightness where it should be but smooth the transition to the black so the edges of the zones aren’t visible. Sony says that many rivals simply lower the brightness of these highlights in order to reduce revealing the shape of the zones or creating a halo effect, and we certainly felt that Samsung's 2021 Neo QLEDs were a little reticent when asked to display very bright objects on otherwise very dark backgrounds. Perhaps Sony has overcome this issue?

Standard OLED TVs, including a 42-inch model

While QD-OLED is quite rightly stealing most of the headlines, Sony isn't abandoning standard OLED technology just yet. For 2022, it's launching the A80K, which is the replacement for the excellent A80J, and the A90K, which essentially sits between the A95K and A80K but is only available in smaller sizes. In fact, the A90K will be Sony's first 42-inch OLED TV, joining LG's 42-inch C2 in a battle for your desktop.

Sony's standard OLED TVs utilise XR OLED Contrast Pro, which apparently sees a number of factors (a high luminance panel, temperature distribution mapping, simultaneous WRGB light emission and intelligent control from the XR processor) combine to generate higher peak and overall brightness than from rival OLED TVs. When asked, Sony wouldn't be drawn on whether the A90K and A80K use LG's new OLED EX panel, but did state that they utilise "the latest available panels", which would suggest that that's the case.

More Cognitive Processor XR improvements

At the heart of Sony's 2022 XR TVs is the Cognitive Processor XR, which debuted last year. The most notable addition for 2022 is a new 'Depth Map' feature that identifies and enhances near objects while slightly suppressing the background in order to increase depth perception.

Sony has also apparently enhanced its Flexible Colour Contrast Control feature, which is designed to intelligently improve the vibrancy of colours on screen without adding artificiality. For 2022, this feature is said to have more control over saturation as well as luminance, making greater enhancement possible.

Finally, there's a new Netflix Adaptive Calibrated Mode, which adds ambient light-based automatic brightness adjustment to the Netflix Calibrated feature.

Refinement of Acoustic Surface Audio and Acoustic Multi-Audio

Sony is continuing to use Acoustic Surface Audio for its OLEDs (this uses actuators that vibrate the whole screen in order to make sound) and Acoustic Multi-Audio for its premium LCD sets. Both technologies have been refined for 2022, though, both in terms of driver designs and layouts.

More models now also support Sony's Acoustic Centre Sync feature, which allows the TV to work in conjunction with the HT-A9 speaker system or HT-A7000 soundbar, utilising the speakers of both.

Introduction of Bravia CAM

Now here's a slightly odd one: the Z9K and A95K TVs both come bundled with a video camera that magnetically attaches to the top edge. This 'Bravia CAM' is also available as an optional accessory for the A90K, A80K, X95K, X90K, X85K and X80K.

Sony is promising that the Bravia CAM will eventually boast a number of features, such as Ambient Optimisation Pro (which adjusts picture and sound based on where you are in the room), Gesture Control of the TV, Proximity Alert (which is designed to prevent kids from standing or sitting too close to the TV) and Auto Power Saving Mode (which detects when you’ve left the room and dims the screen). At launch, though, it will only offer video chat functionality, initially via Google Duo, with potentially more services to be added in the future.

It's currently a bit hard to get too excited about Bravia CAM because a) it feels like the demand for video calling has waned somewhat in recent months and b) Sony's track record of adding features via firmware is very poor, but we live in hope that it turns out to be better than expected.

New, smaller remote controls

Sony 2022 remote control

(Image credit: Sony)

Sony's remote controls have been on a diet, with the two 2022 zappers being 36 percent smaller than their 2021 equivalents. That's largely down to a reduction in the number of buttons from 49 to 25, with the alphanumeric keypad being the most obvious sacrifice (there's now a single number button that brings up an onscreen keypad). There are still four shortcut buttons on each remote, with images suggesting these will instantly open Netflix, Disney+, Amazon Prime Video and Bravia Core, though this selection could vary based on where you are in the world.

The more premium of the two remotes, which comes with the Z9K, A95K, A90K and X95K, has an aluminium finish, backlit buttons and a neat finder function that has the zapper emit a beep when you say 'Ok Google, find my remote' to the TV.

The standard remote is the same shape and has the same selection of buttons, but its got a black plastic finish and lacks the premium zapper's backlight and finder function. This one comes with the A80K and X90K.

(Slightly) upgraded gaming features

On the gaming front, the good news is that most models in the new range boast 48Gbps HDMI 2.1 ports that support 4K 120Hz gaming from PS5, Xbox Series X and the latest PC graphics cards. ALLM (Auto Low Latency Mode) is supported, too, and Sony is promising that these new models will also have VRR (Variable Refresh Rate) at launch.

The synchronicity between Sony TVs and the PS5 is set to continue as well, with the new XR models all boasting Auto HDR Tone Mapping (which allows the PS5 to detect the specific model of TV to which it’s connected and automatically select the appropriate HDR tone map) and Auto Genre Picture Mode (which is simply a PS5-specific version of ALLM).

The bad news is that the 4K models in Sony's 2022 range still have only two HDMI 2.1 sockets each (the Z9K 8K TV has an extra, 40Gbps HDMI) and one of those also handles eARC. In other words, if you need to use eARC to get sound from the TV to a soundbar or AV receiver, you'll have just one HDMI 2.1 input left. Most of LG's OLED TVs have four HDMI 2.1 sockets and have done so for years.

The other slight disappointments on the gaming front are a lack of a Dolby Vision Game preset, which means Dolby Vision gaming (offered by the Xbox Series X) will likely be rather laggy, and the lack of an HGiG mode for more accurate HDR tone mapping.

Continuation of Bravia Core

Bravia Core, the slightly odd but very good streaming service that's exclusive to Sony's XR TVs, continues in 2022 and should benefit from a new Bravia Core Calibrated Mode that optimises the picture for the content.

As before, each TV will come with a certain number of credits that can be redeemed against movies in the Bravia Core store, and further titles can be rented or bought on a pay-as-you-go basis.

Sony 2022 TV range breakdown

So that's the overall technical outlook of Sony's 2022 TV range, but what about the specific models? Scroll down for a full breakdown of the range, with all of the detail we have so far on each.

You'll notice that we don't yet have pricing or availability for any of these new TVs, but we will update this page with all of that extra info just as soon as we have it.

Sony Z9K Master Series 8K MiniLED TV

Sony XR-85Z9K

(Image credit: Sony)

Sony Z9K specs:

  • Sizes: 75-inch, 85-inch
  • Display type: LCD with MiniLED backlight
  • Resolution: 8K
  • Processor: Cognitive Processor XR
  • HDMI 2.1: Yes x3 (2x 48Gbps, 1x 40Gbps)
  • Gaming features: 4K 120Hz, VRR, ALLM, Auto HDR Tone Mapping and Auto Genre Picture Mode for PS5
  • Sound: 2.2ch Acoustic Multi-Audio

Sony Z9K pricing:

  • Sony XR-75Z9K: TBC
  • Sony XR-85Z9K: TBC

Sony A95K Master Series 4K QD-OLED TV

Sony XR-65A95K

(Image credit: Sony)

Sony A95K specs:

  • Sizes: 55-inch, 65-inch
  • Display type: QD-OLED
  • Resolution: 4K
  • Processor: Cognitive Processor XR
  • HDMI 2.1: Yes x2 (48Gbps)
  • Gaming features: 4K 120Hz, VRR, ALLM, Auto HDR Tone Mapping and Auto Genre Picture Mode for PS5
  • Sound: 2.2ch Acoustic Surface Audio+

Sony A95K pricing:

  • Sony XR-55A95K: TBC
  • Sony XR-65A95K: TBC

Sony A90K Master Series 4K OLED TV

Sony XR-48A90K

(Image credit: Sony)

Sony A90K specs:

  • Sizes: 42-inch, 48-inch
  • Display type: OLED
  • Resolution: 4K
  • Processor: Cognitive Processor XR
  • HDMI 2.1: Yes x2 (48Gbps)
  • Gaming features: 4K 120Hz, VRR, ALLM, Auto HDR Tone Mapping and Auto Genre Picture Mode for PS5
  • Sound: 2.1ch Acoustic Surface Audio+

Sony A90K pricing:

  • Sony XR-42A90K: TBC
  • Sony XR-48A90K: TBC

Sony A80K 4K OLED TV

Sony XR-65A80K

(Image credit: Sony)

Sony A80K specs:

  • Sizes: 55-inch, 65-inch, 77-inch
  • Display type: OLED
  • Resolution: 4K
  • Processor: Cognitive Processor XR
  • HDMI 2.1: Yes x2 (48Gbps)
  • Gaming features: 4K 120Hz, VRR, ALLM, Auto HDR Tone Mapping and Auto Genre Picture Mode for PS5
  • Sound: 3.2ch Acoustic Surface Audio+

Sony A80K pricing:

  • Sony XR-55A80K: TBC
  • Sony XR-65A80K: TBC
  • Sony XR-77A80K: TBC

Sony A75K 4K OLED TV

Sony XR-65A75K

(Image credit: Sony)

The A75K wasn't announced during CES and was instead quietly revealed a little later on. Despite that, for certain people it could be the ideal 2022 Sony TV. For starters, it's expected to be the most affordable OLED in Sony's range, but its downgrades from the A80K are largely focused on the design and sound. It terms of picture quality, it should be right up there, and it also still has HDMI 2.1 sockets with full support for advanced gaming features such as 4K 120Hz.

In other words, if you've already got a dedicated sound system and aren't fussed about fancy materials, this could be the perfect way to get a Sony OLED at a discounted price – though how much of a discount isn't yet known.

Sony A75K specs:

  • Sizes: 55-inch, 65-inch
  • Display type: OLED
  • Resolution: 4K
  • Processor: Cognitive Processor XR
  • HDMI 2.1: Yes x2 (48Gbps)
  • Gaming features: 4K 120Hz, VRR, ALLM, Auto HDR Tone Mapping and Auto Genre Picture Mode for PS5
  • Sound: TBC

Sony X95K 4K MiniLED TV

Sony XR-65X95K

(Image credit: Sony)

Sony X95K specs:

  • Sizes: 65-inch, 75-inch, 85-inch
  • Display type: LCD with MiniLED backlight
  • Resolution: 4K
  • Processor: Cognitive Processor XR
  • HDMI 2.1: Yes x2 (48Gbps)
  • Gaming features: 4K 120Hz, VRR, ALLM, Auto HDR Tone Mapping and Auto Genre Picture Mode for PS5
  • Sound: 2.2ch Acoustic Multi-Audio

Sony X95K pricing:

  • Sony XR-65X95K: TBC
  • Sony XR-75X95K: TBC
  • Sony XR-85X95K: TBC

Sony X90K 4K LCD TV

Sony XR-65X90K

(Image credit: Sony)

Sony X90K specs:

  • Sizes: 55-inch, 65-inch, 75-inch, 85-inch
  • Display type: LCD with Full Array LED backlight
  • Resolution: 4K
  • Processor: Cognitive Processor XR
  • HDMI 2.1: Yes x2 (48Gbps)
  • Gaming features: 4K 120Hz, VRR, ALLM, Auto HDR Tone Mapping and Auto Genre Picture Mode for PS5
  • Sound: TBC

Sony X90K pricing:

  • Sony XR-55X90K: TBC
  • Sony XR-65X90K: TBC
  • Sony XR-75X90K: TBC
  • Sony XR-85X90K: TBC

Sony X85K 4K LCD TV

Sony XR-65X85K

(Image credit: Sony)

Sony X85K specs:

  • Sizes: 43-inch, 50-inch, 55-inch, 65-inch, 75-inch, 85-inch
  • Display type: LCD with Direct LED backlight
  • Resolution: 4K
  • Processor: X1
  • HDMI 2.1: TBC
  • Gaming features: 4K 120Hz, VRR, ALLM, Auto HDR Tone Mapping and Auto Genre Picture Mode for PS5
  • Sound: X-Balanced speaker

Sony X85K pricing:

  • Sony KD-43X85K: TBC
  • Sony KD-50X85K: TBC
  • Sony KD-55X85K: TBC
  • Sony KD-65X85K: TBC
  • Sony KD-75X85K: TBC
  • Sony KD-85X85K: TBC

Sony X80K 4K LCD TV

Sony XR-65X80K

(Image credit: Sony)

Sony X80K specs:

  • Sizes: 43-inch, 50-inch, 55-inch, 65-inch, 75-inch
  • Display type: LCD with Direct LED backlight
  • Resolution: 4K
  • Processor: X1
  • HDMI 2.1: No
  • Gaming features: ALLM
  • Sound: X-Balanced speaker

Sony X80K pricing:

  • Sony KD-43X80K: TBC
  • Sony KD-50X80K: TBC
  • Sony KD-55X80K: TBC
  • Sony KD-65X80K: TBC
  • Sony KD-75X80K: TBC

Sony X72K 4K LCD TV

Sony X72K

(Image credit: Sony)

Sony X72K specs:

  • Sizes: 43-inch, 50-inch
  • Display type: LCD (backlight type TBC)
  • Resolution: 4K
  • Processor: Bravia Engine
  • HDMI 2.1: No
  • Gaming features: TBC
  • Sound: TBC

Sony X72K pricing:

  • Sony KD-43X72K: TBC
  • Sony KD-50X72K: TBC
Tom Parsons
Tom Parsons

Tom Parsons has been writing about TV, AV and hi-fi products (not to mention plenty of other 'gadgets' and even cars) for over 15 years. He began his career as What Hi-Fi?'s Staff Writer and is now the TV and AV Editor. In between, he worked as Reviews Editor and then Deputy Editor at Stuff, and over the years has had his work featured in publications such as T3, The Telegraph and Louder. He's also appeared on BBC News, BBC World Service, BBC Radio 4 and Sky Swipe. In his spare time Tom is a runner and gamer.