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DTS to launch Play-Fi TVs that can integrate into wireless surround sound systems

DTS Play-Fi
(Image credit: DTS)

DTS has announced that users of its Play-Fi streaming platform will soon be able to add compatible TVs to their wireless surround speaker systems, allowing the TV's in-built speakers to integrate into a full surround set-up with up to two subwoofers. 

Users will have the choice to add the TV as the central channel in a compatible wireless multichannel system, as well as the option to just stream audio to a Play-Fi-enabled soundbar or speaker.

The first TVs supporting 'Play-Fi Home Theatre' will become available this autumn, and DTS has stated that compatible models won't require any additional hardware changes. There’s no confirmation yet which TVs may support the technology, but Phillips already has a Play-Fi TV app that offers headphones and multiroom streaming. Moreover, Hisense, Loewe and Sharp are listed as brands currently developing new Play-Fi systems, though it's not known for which products.

DTS Play-Fi launched in 2012 as a wireless audio streaming platform and app that lets you connect and control various devices together over wi-fi.

The technology is compatible with a range of products, such as wireless speakers, amplifiers, music streamers and media servers from over 27 different brands, including Audiolab, Arcam, Klipsch, Onkyo, Philips, Polk, Quad, Rotel, Pioneer and Sonus Faber. A full list of supported brands can be found here

DTS joins other companies allowing customers to include TV speakers into a multi-channel set-up rather than just muting them in favour of an external device. Samsung’s recent TVs and soundbars can be used concurrently to create a wider soundstage in a feature called ‘Q-Symphony’, while Sony’s HT-A9 wireless surround speaker package can sync with Bravia TVs to create a centre channel. 

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Mary is a staff writer at What Hi-Fi? and has over a decade of experience working as a sound engineer mixing live events, music and theatre.