Nothing else matters now that there's a Metallica turntable

Metallica turntable Pro-Ject
(Image credit: Future)

Sad but true, there's nothing like a special edition to attract a bit of attention. Sprinkle some celebrity dust into the mix and you're surely on to a winner. That's no doubt the thinking behind this vicious-looking limited edition Metallica turntable, courtesy of Pro-Ject. 

In the shape of the famous Metallica symbol, and looking like it could have your hand off if you weren't careful, the turntable boasts a diamond cut aluminium sub-platter, electronic speed change, Pick it S2 C black cartridge (which can be swapped out for one of your choosing) and a detachable SME headshell.

Metallica turntable

(Image credit: Pro-Ject)

Metallica turntable red vinyl

(Image credit: Pro-Ject)

Pro-Ject treated the surface of the new turntable with a mirror-finished metal logo contour to give the player its distinctive look, which certainly befits the rock legends. Tracking force, anti-skating and VTA are fully adjustable for fine-tuning, which might sound less rock and roll, but are certainly useful features on a record player. 

Pro-Ject has confirmed the turntable, which is part of the company's Artist Series Record Players, is due on sale in August and will cost £1149 ($1599). 

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The company has previously released Beatles themed turntables, including an imaginative Yellow Submarine deck.

The turntable was on show at Munich High End show. Want to see more? Check out our pick of the best products from High End 2022.

Joe Cox
Content Director

Joe is Content Director for Specialist Tech at Future and was previously the Global Editor-in-Chief of What Hi-Fi?. He has worked on What Hi-Fi? across print and online for more than 15 years, writing news, reviews and features. He has covered product launch events across the world, from Apple to Technics, Sony and Samsung, reported from CES, the Bristol Show and Munich High End for many years, and provided comment for sites such as the BBC and the Guardian. In his spare time he enjoys playing records and cycling (not at the same time).