The Bluesound Pulse Soundbar will be able to stream high-resolution audio through a three-way speaker configuration with tri-amplification, and is expected to be available later this month.

Want hi-res sound quality from a soundbar? Well, you're (almost) in luck. Bluesound has announced that its Pulse Soundbar will be the world's first to provide hi-res network audio streaming.

According to the company, the soundbar will use a three-way speaker configuration with tri-amplification, meaning that each driver will have its own dedicated channel to achieve high quality sound. The Soundbar will support 24-Bit/192KHz audio resolution as well as Master Quality Authenticated (MQA) streams

In terms of features, the Pulse Soundbar should be able to support MP3, AAC, WMP, Ogg, FLAC,and ALAC files, either streamed via aptX Bluetooth, wi-fi, ethernet connections or through a USB. There's also an IR sensor, so you'll be able to use your existing TV remote to control the volume or mute the soundbar.

The Pulse Soundbar will be available later this month, priced at £999

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Comments

TrevC's picture

Hi res audio? LOL.

Hi res audio? LOL.

Graham Luke's picture

Is it on...?

Now you can enjoy inaudible sound frequencies from a bar shaped speaker in front of the telly! Hurrah!

Kelvin Marshall's picture

FACTS MUCH?

24 bit has nothing to do with frequency. The 192 KHZ does and can be overkill. Soundwaves do affect one another. So just because you can't hear them doesn't mean they don't have an affect on other waves.

It is a digital representation of sound which results in an more accurate sound wave. Of something good was recorded at 24 bit it would sound better than something recorded at 16 bit. You guys probably listen to all your music on your phone or IPODS. get an ASTELL & kern player and good headphones. You will hear the difference.

Graham Luke's picture

Facts...?

I don't think very much of anything is recorded at 16 bit depth these days. Indeed most recording and mastering is done at a 24 bit rate but when it comes to buying and listening to a file over 16 bit, you're getting a lot of...well...nothing.

And the effect 'on other waves' in a so-called 'hi-res' file can often be negative; '24-192 Music Downloads Are Very Silly Indeed' on xiph.org should be compulsory reading for anyone interested in 'hi-res' audio.

Oh, and one shouldn't presume what other people are listening to; audiophools are ten a penny on tech sites, unfortunately.

Kelvin Marshall's picture

FACTS MUCH?

Blah