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Google Pixel 7 video leak reveals prototype handset design

Google Pixel 7 video leak reveals prototype handsets
(Image credit: Google)

Early "developer versions" of Google's upcoming Pixel 7 and Pixel 7 Pro smartphones have surfaced on the internet (via Mashable).

YouTuber Unbox Therapy revealed the handsets – claimed to be "near-final" prototypes – in an 8-minute video entitled 'Google Pixel 7 + Pixel 7 Pro Early Hands On'.

As you can see, Google seems to have stuck with the sleek "visor-like" design, complete with "camera bar" to the rear. The standard Pixel 7 features two cameras, while the Pixel 7 Pro boasts three. 

The 6.2-inch Pixel 7 is a touch shorter than its predecessor, the 6.4-inch Pixel 6. It also weighs 10g less (195g vs 205g). The range-topping 6.7-inch Pixel 7 Pro is a touch wider than the 6.7-inch Pixel 6 Pro, which could indicate improved battery life.

Both prototypes appear to feature a discreet-looking Google logo, while the Pro model has a polished edge (it's matt aluminium on the non-pro model). Interesting. Although it's worth remembering that these aren't the final "retail" versions.

Neither device boots up, so we can't learn anything about the battery life or camera specs. The video does, however, appear to confirm that the Pixel 7 features 8GB RAM and 128GB of storage, while the Pro model allegedly packs 12GB RAM and 256GB of storage. 

We'd expect both models to run Google's latest Tensor chip and support wireless charging (unlike the budget Pixel 6a). We know from previous leaks that the Pixel 7 is due to be unveiled in October, so stay tuned for more Pixel 7 leaks in the run-up to the big day.

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Tom is a journalist, copywriter and content designer based in the UK. He has written articles for T3, ShortList, The Sun, The Mail on Sunday, The Daily Telegraph, Elle Deco, The Sunday Times, Men's Health, Mr Porter, Oracle and many more (including What Hi-Fi?). His specialities include mobile technology, electric vehicles and video streaming.