Everyone likes simplicity and convenience, but no one wants to sacrifice performance. Here are four brilliant systems that refuse to compromise...

The home entertainment industry's desire to cram ever-more functionality into as small a space has possible expresses itself as 'convergance'. Exactly what constitues a music system these days is more and more difficult to pin down - but we're in no doubt these four winners have what it takes...

Best microsystem

It's not broken, so Denon has wisely chosen not to fix it. The D-M microsystem has evolved over the years until we reach this, the D-M41DAB (£380, above) - a gentle improvement on a product that was already the best of its type. If space is tight and budget a consideration, this is the only game in town.

More after the break

Best all-in-one systems

All-in-one systems (or, in the case of KEF's LS50 Wireless (£2000, above), all-in-two) are all about plug'n'play convenience - there's nothing else to do once it's attached to the mains. 

Revo's brilliant SuperSystem (£550, top) is simple to use, has plenty of options in terms of connectivity and, most important of all, sounds great. The stereo image, inevitably, isn't the biggest - but the SuperSystem is a confident, authoritative and engaging listen. And on top of all that, it looks the business as a little piece of furniture too.

The LS50 Wireless, on the other hand, are perhaps the most fully realised example of an all-in system we've heard. That price isn't insignificant, but we've heard separates systems at similar money that don't sound as convincing - and didn't have half the KEFs' functionality. They didn't look as striking, either.  

Best hi-fi systems

Of all the 'audiophile' hi-fi brands dotted around the British Isles, Naim is among the most forward-thinking. Its new Uniti range is proof of its intrepid nature - and this Uniti Atom (£1750, above) is the most accomplished product of its type we've heard all year. Amplification and superb digital-to-analogue conversion are on board, there is a raft of input options, its control app is better than most, and the full-colour display can only be the most expensive and effective Naim could find. If the looks appeal and the price is acceptable, you owe it to yourself to have a listen.

MORE: Awards 2017: Systems

MORE: All the winners from the What Hi-Fi? Awards 2017