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Krell Foundation 7.1 AV processor lands in the UK for £6500

We first clapped eyes on the Krell Foundation at CES back in January, and we're impressed enough then to vote it one of our Stars of CES 2013.

It's now landed here in the UK courtesy of distributor Absolute Sounds, with a price tag of £6500, and will be available from July. For the money, you get a 7.1 channel preamp/processor with 'state-of-the-art digital audio processing' and the legendary build quality for which the Connectcut-based company is known.

Onboard processing handles Dolby Digital, Dolby Digital Plus, Dolby TrueHD, DTS, DTS-ES Discrete, Matrix and DTS-HD Master Audio soundtracks. Post-processing modes inlcude Dolby Pro-Logic IIx and DTS Neo:6, as well as Krell' proprietary surround modes 'Party', 'General Admission', 'Front Row' and 'On Stage'.

3D TV passthrough comes as standard, along with automatic set-up and room EQ, 10 HDMI 1.4a inputs, a pair of HDMI outputs (both of which feature Auto Return Channel (ARC) so a TV or display can send audio back down the cable to the processor.

One new development is 'Intelligent HDMI' switching, which Krell says is "a combination of circuitry and innovative software that optimises HDMI operation". All 10 source inputs are permanently active, so channel, source, video resolution and audio format changes are instantaneous.

Additional features include three optical and three coaxial digital inputs, six analogue video inputs (three componnet and three composite, transcoded to HDMI), ethernet control, balanced and unbalanced outputs, an analogue zone 2 output and dual subwoofer outputs.

By Andy Clough

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Andy is Global Brand Director of What Hi-Fi? and has been a technology journalist for 30 years. During that time he has covered everything from VHS and Betamax, MiniDisc and DCC to CDi, Laserdisc and 3D TV, and any number of other formats that have come and gone. He loves nothing better than a good old format war. Andy edited several hi-fi and home cinema magazines before relaunching whathifi.com in 2008 and helping turn it into the global success it is today. When not listening to music or watching TV, he spends far too much of his time reading about cars he can't afford to buy.