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The first 42-inch LG C2 OLED TVs have arrived – but there's a problem

Current 42-inch LG C2 OLEDs use an older panel type: LG OLED Evo 2022
(Image credit: LG)

LG's first 42-inch OLED TV has only just hit stores, but already there's a bit of a concern: some of the first sets are missing the latest and greatest OLED panel (known as WBE) and instead use an older, more conventional panel (WBC).

The discovery was first made by HDTVtest, and LG responded by confirming the snafu to Korean site KBench

"LG explained that it is true that WBC and WBE are mixed in the 42-inch OLED TV Evo and that it is an unavoidable situation depending on LG Display’s panel supply situation," reads the report. "WBE panels will be applied sequentially after Q2."

The WBE panel, often now referred to as OLED.EX, is claimed by panel manufacturer LG Display (which, it's important to note, is distinct from TV manufacturer LG Electronics) to offer a claimed 30 per cent brightness over conventional displays, as well as a slimmer design, improved energy efficiency and fewer dead pixels.

That might make it sound as if you should definitely seek out an OLED42C2 with the WBE, but LG Electronics actually claims that "there is no visual difference between WBE and WBC panels and both will give the same consumer experience". That may be at least in part because, as LG has already stated, the 42-inch and 48-inch C2 OLEDs – despite being branded as 'OLED Evo' models – won't offer a major boost in brightness compared to non-Evo models. This is apparently because the high pixel density of the smaller OLED panels prevents them from benefiting from the 'Brightness Booster' tech that's in the larger C2 models.

Working out whether your 42-inch C2 has a WBC or WBE panel sounds as if it could be a tricky affair. On 2021's C1 it was possible to find the information by accessing a secret Service Menu using a third-party remote control, but LG tells us that the panel information is no longer displayed here.

LG's C2 OLEDs range from £1399 / $1399 (around AU$2450) for the 42-inch model to £5499 / $5499 (around AU$7400) for the 83-incher. The 42-inch model is on sale now in the UK, and is due to land in the US next month.

In the meantime, check out our LG G2 review.

MORE:

LG 2022 TV lineup: everything you need to know

Everything you need to know about Samsung's rival QD-OLED technology?

LG's 2022 OLED TVs support a new supercharged version of Dolby Vision

Tom is a journalist, copywriter and content designer based in the UK. He has written articles for T3, ShortList, The Sun, The Mail on Sunday, The Daily Telegraph, Elle Deco, The Sunday Times, Men's Health, Mr Porter, Oracle and many more (including What Hi-Fi?). His specialities include mobile technology, electric vehicles and video streaming.

  • brainguynyc
    Does this also apply to the 48"?
    Reply
  • Fit_HyFy
    Has checking OLED Cell Info in the Service Menu on the LG 42 OLED been tested?

    Looking at this screen from ***** there does not appear to be a OLED Cell info option
    3437
    Reply
  • 12th Monkey
    Fit_HyFy said:
    Has checking OLED Cell Info in the Service Menu on the LG 42 OLED been tested?

    Looking at this screen from ***** there does not appear to be a OLED Cell info option
    Please don't use posts to drive traffic to other sites - unless specifically asked. Forum rules appear at the start of most sub-forums.
    Reply
  • Fit_HyFy
    12th Monkey said:
    Please don't use posts to drive traffic to other sites - unless specifically asked. Forum rules appear at the start of most sub-forums.
    That was not the aim of my post. I am just challenging if the article is correct. It says:

    Want to know if your 42-inch C2 has a WBC or WBE panel? You'll need to bring up the hidden Service Menu (check how to do this online as it varies between models). Then find the line that reads "OLED Cell Info" – it should say either WBC or WBE.

    The link is just me referencing my evidence. The article already references to the same youtube video I did in the "As discovered by HDTVtest" section.
    Reply
  • 12th Monkey
    OK, though as it was your first post I suspect you can see why it would look that way.
    Reply
  • Geoff-W
    So once again, customers who have to buy the smaller screen sizes because of space limitations, are short-changed on the performance capabilities compared to the larger screens. I'm fed up of having no choice but to buy these 'crippled', lower tech TV's.
    Reply