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NEWS: Onkyo adds 2.1 universal DVD system to its home cinema range

Onkyo is targeting one-box movie systems from the likes of Arcam and Denon with the launch of its LS-V501, an all-in-one home cinema set-up.

The DVD receiver unit is available on its own for £400, or with Onkyo's 2.1 speaker system for £600.

The HDMI-equipped receiver uses the same cutting-edge technologies as the firm's 2007 range of Award-winning receivers, Onkyo claims, married to an integrated DVD player that will play any DVD, CD, SACD and DVD-Audio disc – as well as WMA, JPEG and DivX discs.

Power output is a claimed 50 watts per channel. The LV-S501 will also upscale video to 720p/1080i, can be used with one of Onkyo's optional iPod docks, and has one HDMI input and one component input for video switching of other source components.

Audio is handled by a 192kHz/24-bit digital-to-analogue converter, while a 108MHz/14-bit video DAC is used to ensure judder- and noise-free images.

Virtual surround sound is created using Onkyo's Theater Dimensional DSP circuit, and if you buy the HTP-501 speaker package you'll get two, wall-mountable, magnetically-shielded satellite speakers and a 100W active subwoofer.

Other features include a 40-preset FM/AM radio, one optical and one coaxial digital input and a subwoofer preout. And as a nod to the environment, power consumption in standby mode is just 0.4W.

Onkyo has two iPod docks that can be used with the system: the DS-A1X dock (£40), or the £60 DS-A2X with remote control.

Technorati Tags: 2.1, CD player, DivX, DVD Audio, DVD player, FM, HDMI, hi-fi, iPod, iPod dock, radio, SACD, standby mode, surround speaker system, universal, video upconversion, WMA

Andy Clough

Andy is Global Brand Director of What Hi-Fi? and has been a technology journalist for 30 years. During that time he has covered everything from VHS and Betamax, MiniDisc and DCC to CDi, Laserdisc and 3D TV, and any number of other formats that have come and gone. He loves nothing better than a good old format war. Andy edited several hi-fi and home cinema magazines before relaunching whathifi.com in 2008 and helping turn it into the global success it is today. When not listening to music or watching TV, he spends far too much of his time reading about cars he can't afford to buy.