From a new partnership that'll see Spotify streamed into Uber's fleet of taxi to Mitsubishi Electric's huge new video screen in New York's Times Square – here is the news in brief from What Hi-Fi?'s Wednesday Wrap.

And we start this week's [19th November] with the announcement that Spotify has joined forces with Uber to let you control the music coming out of your taxi's speakers – provided you have a Spotify Premium subscription.

You can connect your Spotify account from the Uber profile screen. Once this is done, you simply need to request a Uber ride as usual – if your car is music-enabled, the music bar will appear.

Read more: uber.com

MORE: Spotify review

Skrillex Edition UE BOOM

Ultimate Ears has collaborated with six-time Grammy Award-winning electronic dance producer Skrillex to unveil the Skrillex Edition UE Boom wireless speaker, which is expected to cost $199.

It'll be available in the US and selected European countries and provides a new look for a device that we described as having "some great features that you simply don't see" in similar products.

Read more: ultimateears.com

MORE: UE Boom review

More after the break

Mitsubishi Electric's huge video screen

Earlier this year, we reported how a Kentucky racecourse had become the proud recipient of the world's largest 4K video screen, which was installed by Panasonic and measured 171ft x 90ft.

Now, Mitsubishi Electric has revealed it will be unveiling a Diamond Vision screen in New York's Times Square that "exceeds 4K pixel density" (2,368 x 10,048) and will span a huge 25,610sq ft.

Read more: clearchannel.com

MORE: 14 of the world's biggest video screens

Jolla's "people powered" tablet

If the mainstream tablet brands don't appeal to you, what about the "world's first people powered tablet"? That's what Jolla has set out to create, and many have answered the Indiegogo call.

Read more: indiegogo.com

MORE: Best tablets to buy in 2014

40,000 HD movies on one DVD?

If your sprawling DVD collection is starting to make some demands on the space in your home, a team at Australia's Swinburne University of Technology has found a way to store 1000TB of data on a single DVD – that equates to 40,000 HD movies.

Read more: fastcolabs.com

MORE: UK government legalises CD, DVD and Blu-ray copying for personal use