Best record players 2024: top decks reviewed by our experts

Best record players: Quick Menu

There's no stopping the vinyl resurgence: US vinyl sales have risen 17 straight years in a row, and whether you're new to vinyl or a long-standing fan of the format, you'll likely be wondering what record player is best to spin your burgeoning or established vinyl record collection on. Luckily for you, we're here to help.

Whether this is your first deck or you're looking to upgrade, you don't even have to spend a fortune – below is the best record player at a wide range of prices, from affordable $200 to more premium $2000. Our expert picks cover a variety of styles and types too, from purist, performance-first decks without phono stages to fuss-free plug 'n' play options – and even one that can stream your records to Bluetooth speakers and headphones. They all have one thing in common, though: best-in-class sound quality.

Every record player in this guide has been comprehensively tested by our in-house What Hi-Fi? review team in our state-of-the-art listening rooms, so you can be sure you're getting a genuine, expert recommendation. You can read more about our turntable testing process and get in-depth advice on how to choose your turntable, or scroll down to see our favourite record players currently on the market.

The quick list

Recent updates

May 2024: We've added some Also Consider options to give you even more choice – just in case one of our top picks doesn't suit your budget or taste.

Written by
Kashfia Kabir
Written by
Kashfia Kabir

I have been testing, reviewing and listening to turntables ever since I joined What Hi-Fi? over a decade ago, and have been more than swept up in the vinyl revival. The best turntables will deliver rock-solid and precisely engineered build quality, account for any vibrations affecting the deck, and be able to track a record's grooves accurately and in a stable manner to deliver the best sound quality. I have first-hand experience with every turntable in this list and they all sound fantastic (and look good while doing so), so whether you have a strict budget or have plenty of fun money to spend, I'm confident you'll find something you'll love in the recommendations on this list.

Best overall record player

What Hi-Fi? Awards winner. As musical as they come at this popular price point.

Specifications

Type: Belt drive
Operation: Manual
Speeds: 33 ⅓, 45, 78
Speed change: Electronic
Cartridge: Pick It Pro moving magnet
Phono stage: No
USB: No
Bluetooth: No
Dimensions (hwd): 11.3 x 41.5 x 32cm
Weight: 6kg
Finishes: 1 (satin black)

Reasons to buy

+
Clarity and sonic precision
+
Taut and controlled bass
+
Impressive finesse
+
Fine build

Reasons to avoid

-
Some might prefer a richer sound balance

Pro-Ject's latest Debut Pro model celebrates the company's 30th anniversary and is the most ambitious and sophisticated Debut model yet. It's a classy-looking deck and easy to set up. Pro-Ject’s engineers have carefully developed almost every aspect of the design, from the new carbon fibre and aluminium tonearm to the dedicated Pick It Pro cartridge.

This Debut Pro turntable is terrific at digging deep into the production and revealing layers of instrumental textures that most at this level ignore. It sounds incredibly precise and crisp. Its presentation is a little on the lean side, but the upside of such a balance is agility. It produces a stable and controlled sound too, one that retains its composure even when the music becomes dense and demanding. Stereo imaging and a spacious soundstage prove admirable and we are impressed with the sonic authority on offer.

Pro-Ject isn't short of rivals at this price, mainly the stellar five-star Rega Planar 3/Elys 2, a legendary model that has long held the top spot in this particular price bracket in its various iterations over the years. It's now pricier than ever before (£100 more than the Pro-Ject) and offers a bit more in terms of dynamic expression and outright attack and excitement. But the Pro-Ject Debut Pro sounds a little cleaner and crisper, delivering low frequencies with an agility and tautness even the Rega struggles to match. It goes to show just how talented this superb-sounding Pro-Ject deck is. Not only a multiple What Hi-Fi? Award-winner, it's also now the best value option at this price point. 

Read the full Pro-Ject Debut Pro review

Best budget record player

What Hi-Fi? Awards winner. A brilliant entry-level turntable that prioritises sound quality.

Specifications

Type : Belt drive
Operation : Manual
Speeds : 33 ⅓, 45
Speed change : Manual
Cartridge : Rega Carbon moving magnet
Phono stage : No
USB : No
Bluetooth : No
Dimensions (hwd): 11.7 x 44.7 x 36cm
Weight : 4.2kg
Finishes : 3 (white, black, walnut)

Reasons to buy

+
Brilliant amount of detail
+
Rhythmic and expressive
+
Easy to set up

Reasons to avoid

-
Requires a separate phono stage
-
Upgrades available - at extra cost 

It’s hard to think of a company that really gets how to make consistently good record players quite like Rega, now celebrating its 50th anniversary. The Rega Planar 1 is the cheapest turntable Rega makes and has been a What Hi-Fi? Award-winner since 2016 and in truth, it’s an accolade it fully deserves. Built superbly to Rega’s typically high standards and featuring a Rega Carbon cartridge attached to a new RB110 tonearm, the belt-drive design is easy to use and simple to set up.

There aren't many other bells and whistles to speak of, although you can upgrade this model with Rega's optional Performance Pack, which includes a moving magnet cartridge and deluxe wool mat.

It's a purist turntable – no phono stage, no Bluetooth or USB – but it's such a significant step-up from most budget decks and delivers excellent value for money, making it an attractive option for those on tighter budgets. 

The real attraction here is the dynamic sound. The Planar 1's delivery is spellbinding and well beyond what you might expect from an 'entry-level' turntable, surpassing that of the cheaper Audio Technica and Sony turntables also on this list. Rega’s forensic attention to detail results in a roomy, spacious presentation, while voices sound superb and rich. The Planar 1 delivers a combination of clarity and accuracy that's almost unparalleled at this entry-level price, providing an exciting and engaging experience no matter what you throw at it. 

If you're in the market for the best record player for around $500, this is it.

Read the full Rega Planar 1 review

Top Tip
Kashfia Kabir
Top Tip
Kashfia Kabir

How do you set up a turntable? All the elements – tonearm, cartridge, headshell, counterbalance/weight, platter – should be included in most turntables, along with instructions on how to set up each deck. Setting up the cartridge and tracking force yourself are the trickiest but most important steps, so do take the time to set it up carefully and correctly. We'd recommend getting a tracking force gauge (they're affordable and easy to buy) to help check you've set the precise tracking weight and downforce according to the cartridge manufacturer's recommendations. If it's heavier or lighter, it will have an impact on your record player's sound – so it's important to get it just right.

Best Bluetooth record player

A simple yet successfully executed turntable that can stream your vinyl to Bluetooth devices.

Specifications

Type: Direct drive
Operation: Fully automatic
Speeds: 33 ⅓, 45
Speed change: Electronic
Cartridge: Moving magnet
Phono stage: Yes
USB: No
Bluetooth: Yes
Dimensions (hwd): 10.8 x 43 x 36.7cm
Weight: 3.5kg
Finishes: 1 (black)

Reasons to buy

+
Entertaining sound
+
Easy to use
+
Bluetooth

Reasons to avoid

-
Sound can be bettered at this budget price

If you're looking for a supremely fuss-free entry into the world of vinyl, this brilliant Sony turntable with fully automatic operation deserves an audition. Set-up is a piece of cake: there's no need to fit and align a cartridge, set the tracking force or set the anti-skate, so once you've put the belt around the motor pulley you're all set to spin. The presence of a built-in phono stage and Bluetooth connectivity are a welcome bonus too. 

Despite newer record players with integrated Bluetooth streaming entering the market (even hi-res wireless options like the Cambridge Audio Alva TT V2) this Sony continues to deliver the best combination of performance for a Bluetooth model, and for a very affordable price, too.

There's a healthy dose of drive and attack to music – the Sony unearths a fine level of detail and peels back enough layers of emotion to keep the listener interested. You can pair the PS-LX310BT with up to eight Bluetooth devices and, in our tests using headphones, the connection was strong enough to walk into another room.

A fully manual deck like the Pro-Ject Primary E or the step-up Rega Planar 1 (above) does sound even punchier and clearer, but what the Sony lacks in top-quality sound, it more than makes up by being fun and feature-packed. 

Read the full Sony PS-LX310BT review

Best USB record player

A fine sounding, fuss-free turntable that can rip your records to digital files.

Specifications

Type: Direct drive
Operation: Manual
Speeds: 33 ⅓, 45, 78
Speed change: Electronic
Cartridge: AT-VM95E moving magnet
Phono stage: Yes
USB: Yes
Bluetooth: No
Dimensions (hwd): 15.7 x 45 x 35.2cm
Weight: 7.3kg
Finishes: 1 (black)

Reasons to buy

+
Composed, robust presentation
+
Easy to use and set up
+
Impressive phono stage module
+
USB rips to WAV file quality

Reasons to avoid

-
Purist rivals offer better outright performance

Audio-Technica’s original AT-LP5 turntable was a winner. Launched in 2016, its combination of solid engineering, useful features and fine sound was enough to make it one of our go-to recommendations for anyone wanting a sensibly priced, fuss-free record player with the added bonus of a USB output. 

This meant the current AT-LP5x already had a solid, winning formula to begin with, with a few improvements and additions to the design to make it even better.

There's a new cartridge that's easier to fit, the built-in phono stage can now cope with both moving magnet and moving coil cartridges and Audio Technica has added a 78rpm speed option. Those improvements aside, the LP5x's sonics mirror its predecessor closely. It sounds a touch cleaner and clearer than before, but without losing any of its composure or dynamically pleasing presentation. 

The USB ripping feature remains, so you can digitise your vinyl collection is CD quality WAV files up to 16-bit/44.1kHz and 48kHz. If you're after a well-executed design that's well-built, easy to set up and sounds great for the money, the AT-LP5x is worthy of a spot on your shortlist.

Read the full Audio Technica AT-LP5x review

Best mid-price record player

A wonderfully musical deck and a serious step up from the entry-level Planar 1.

Specifications

Type: Belt drive
Operation: Manual
Speeds: 33 ⅓, 45
Speed change: Manual
Cartridge: Rega Carbon moving magnet
Phono stage: No
USB: No
Bluetooth: No
Dimensions (hwd): 11.7 x 44.7 x 36cm
Weight: 5.5kg
Finishes: 4 (white, black, red, walnut)

Reasons to buy

+
Detailed sound
+
Solid and authoritative
+
Sleek, understated design

Reasons to avoid

-
Needs care in setting up

You might think paying more for a deck would get you more features, but that's not the case here. Rega is notorious for keeping its products pure and uncomplicated (the phono-stage-toting Planar 1 Plus a rare exception), but that doesn't mean the Planar 2 is anything but remarkable for its mid-price point. What it does buy you are some key component upgrades over the entry-level Planar 1 that deliver even better sound quality – all packaged up in a smartly understated design. 

Rega's no-nonsense set-up requires minimal effort, save for ensuring the speed is set correctly (speed change is manual) and fixing the weight to balance the tonearm. Once the tonearm is in a floating position, simply set the Carbon MM cartridge’s tracking force to the recommended 2g. It's not quite 'plug and play', but it's straightforward enough.

Once primed for action, the Planar 2 delivers punchy basslines, room-filling scale impressive attention to detail and rhythmic subtlety. There's no built-in phono stage, so it needs to hook up to a stereo amplifier that has one, or you can always buy a separate one. If that's within your budget, you'll find that the Planar 2 delivers a clear step-in performance from the Planar 1 – and at a very competitive price. 

For those wanting electronic speed change, more colourful finishes and a more laid-back sonic balance, the also-five-stars Pro-Ject Debut Carbon Evo is a solid alternative at this price.

Read the full Rega Planar 2 review

Best premium record player

What Hi-Fi? Awards winner. Easy to use and entertaining to listen to – a winner in every sense.

Specifications

Type: Direct drive
Operation: Semi-automatic
Speeds: 33 ⅓, 45, 78
Speed change: Electronic
Cartridge: Ortofon 2M Red moving magnet
Phono stage: Yes
USB: No
Bluetooth: No
Dimensions: 16.9 x 45.3 x 37.2cm
Weight: 9.9kg
Finishes: 3 (silver, black, white)

Reasons to buy

+
Defined, insightful and musical
+
Impressive bass
+
Simple to use

Reasons to avoid

-
Rega rival offers more insight

The rebirth of Technics has spawned another fantastic turntable. While we love the high-end SL-1000R model (so much so that we use it as part of our reference testing system), the SL-1500C is much more affordable, and it's also one of the best record players we've heard at around a grand that includes a built-in phono stage.

It uses a core-less direct drive motor with clever speed management circuitry and the company's trademark S-shaped arm, which is attached to an Ortofon 2M Red cartridge. Everything is engineered with a pleasing sense of precision that matches the equally-pleasing sound. Music is delivered with a brilliant sense of dynamism and energy, alongside an impressive amount of agile, yet weighty bass.

While purists may prefer the slightly more insightful Rega Planar 3/Elys 2 (which doesn't include an internal phono stage), the Technics SL-1500C offers crisp presentation, a built-in phono stage and electric speed control, making it a great choice for those not totally engrossed in vinyl.

Read the full Technics SL-1500C review

Also consider

  • Rega Planar 3/Elys 2: A fantastic alternative to the Pro-Ject Debut Pro, not least if you prioritise fun and rhythmic drive above outright clarity and precision. This multi-award winner is a couple of hundred dollars cheaper, too.
  • JBL Spinner BT: A slightly pricier alternative to the Sony Bluetooth turntable above, but a classy one that offers higher-quality transmission via its support of aptX HD (if your Bluetooth speaker or headphones also support that codec).
  • Rega Naia/Aphelion 2: If your budget is as big as your love for vinyl, Rega's top-class and utterly high-end Naia could well be the player for you. Indeed, it sets a sky-high standard for resolution and transparency – and is pretty handsome too.

How to choose the best record player for you

The source of your hi-fi system - be it a streamer, CD player or record player - is a crucial component; as the saying goes, 'rubbish in, rubbish out'. 

When it comes to choosing your turntable, first things first: decide on your budget. It should be no more than around a quarter of your system's cost, otherwise, it's unlikely your amplifier and speakers will get the most out of your deck.

Once you've nailed down your budget, decide on the features you require or want. Belt drive or direct drive design? Do you need a phono stage built-in or prefer a purist design? What about the cartridge – is it included or do you have to buy your own? Is Bluetooth streaming or USB recording important to you? Are you happy with a fully manual operation, or would you prefer a less fussy electronic speed change or automatic operation? Turntables have plenty of features, so it pays to check the details to find out which deck you'll be happy to live with. Make sure you have a checklist based on your needs to help you narrow the search.

Looks can play a huge factor – if you have a particular aesthetic in mind for your turntable setup, check that it's available in the finish and style you want. The flashier looks of a Technics or Vertere deck might not be for those who prefer the simplicity of a Rega turntable, while Pro-Ject's colourful choices can appeal to many. We would overall choose a turntable on its sonic merits, but taking pride in your hi-fi's design matters, too.

We would advise you against the 'suitcase'-style record players that remain trendy and are often rather cheap. Many of these turntables don't have the careful engineering or precise build quality that's so crucial to ensuring the tonearm is stable and the needle is accurately reading a record's groove, and many of these kinds of decks also don't let you adjust the tracking force of the cartridge. If this is too heavy (as we discovered with some of the cheaper Crosley decks), then this can damage your records. We don't want that.

Additionally, make sure you read up on the sonic characteristics of all your components to ensure they match your chosen turntable and vice-versa. Not all five-star products are equal, and every hi-fi setup benefits from the right partnering.

Once you have made your choice, it's also crucial you set up your turntable correctly. While some record players are relatively "plug and play", many require a little more time and effort to hear at their best. If you are buying a more high-end record player, ask the dealer if they can arrange a demo before you commit to buying.

This is a quick run-through of the basics of choosing a turntable. But if you want to know more or need more in-depth advice, read our complete guide to choosing the right turntable.

How we test record players

What Hi-Fi? has been reviewing turntables ever since the first magazine issue was published in 1976, and our reviews have remained independent, trusted and thorough ever since across print and online.

The current What Hi-Fi? team has more than 100 years of collective experience in reviewing, testing and writing about consumer electronics – and that includes plenty of record players. We have purpose-built, acoustically treated testing facilities in London and Reading, where our team of expert reviewers do all our in-house testing. This gives us complete control over the testing process, ensuring we are consistent across all product reviews and in our advice. 

When testing turntables, we ensure we place them on a stable, level surface, set them up correctly, and partner with price-appropriate and various partnering electronics. We use a variety of amplifiers and phono stages (if it doesn't have one built in) and also test out extra features such as Bluetooth and USB recording. if the deck has them. We spend plenty of time listening to the turntable, and play a variety of records in a variety of music genres, to test the turntable's sound quality.

All new turntables are tested in comparison with the best-in-class model at the same price level. We keep five-star and What Hi-Fi? Award-winning models across each price bracket in our stockroom so that we can benchmark and compare all turntables that enter our listening rooms. These comparisons are bread-and-butter to our reviewing process, and ensure we give buyers the best advice on which turntable to buy at any given price. 

All turntables are listened to by multiple members of the What Hi-Fi? reviewing team, and the final review verdict is agreed upon by the team as a whole rather than a single reviewer. This method helps to ensure consistency and avoids individual subjectivity and biases. Our reviews are honest and independent, and there is never any input from the brand, PRs or commercial teams on our reviews. That's why our reviews are trusted by customers, retailers and manufacturers alike.

From our reviewers, we hand-pick only the best turntables at each price to feature in this Best Buy guide. That's why if you take the plunge and buy one of the products recommended here, you can rest assured you're getting a What Hi-Fi?-approved product.

You can read more about how we test and review products on What Hi-Fi? here.

FAQ

What is better: direct drive or belt driven turntables?

There are two basic designs of turntables: direct drive and belt drive. This relates to where the motor is positioned. The motor is what sets the speed and makes the platter (on which a vinyl record sits) rotate.

Direct drive designs have the motor placed directly under the platter. This method allows for faster start-up speeds and better rotational stability (how consistently the platter runs at the correct speed). The downside is that unwanted vibrations are more easily introduced. This affects the cartridge and how it tracks the groove in a record, which means distortion is added to the final sound.

Belt drive designs have the motor offset from the platter, and use a belt (or sometimes multiple belts) wrapped around the spindle and the main platter in a pulley system to rotate. This keeps the platter isolated from those pesky vibrations, but because of the different forces being pulled on the belt (which is usually made of a rubber material), the belt can get stretched or lose its tautness over time. This means the rotational speed potentially isn't always consistent, and you'll likely need to replace the belt after a few years.

Which design the manufacturer employs is a matter of preference and which compromise they're happier to deal with, and each brand takes care when making a turntable to account for the flaws in either design. 

In terms of sound, that entirely depends on the individual turntable. Many reliable Technics decks use direct drive, while Rega always uses belt drive designs – both make excellent-sounding turntables, so one design isn't necessarily better than the other.

Do new turntables play old records?

The beauty of an analogue source like a turntable is that the principle of the design has stayed the same across decades. Whether it's a turntable from the 1970s, the 1990s or 2020s – it plays records the exact same way. How well-made the new turntable and its tonearm are, the speed stability and accuracy, and how precisely the cartridge and stylus can track the grooves on the record – these are what matters most when playing your record collection. So you simply have to choose the best-performing turntable for your budget and needs (our recommendations in this list should help!)

What condition your old records are in is another factor. You might need to get them cleaned (there are various record cleaning equipment available) and depending on the type of records you have – 33.3, 45, 75 rpm – it's worth checking that your new turntable can play these different speeds or has an adapter that will let you play all record types.

Do I need to buy speakers for my turntable?

Yes. While you can buy record players with speakers built in, we tend to find these generally perform poorly. A turntable performs better without additional drivers and vibrations affecting the way it tracks the grooves on a record. We'd recommend a pair of good speakers that match your turntable – sonically and price-wise – to get the best performance.

If your turntable has a phono stage built-in, active speakers (ones with amplification built-in) such as Ruark MR1 Mk2 or KEF LSX II LT are ideal pairings. Otherwise, there's plenty of choice when it comes to passive speakers from brands such as Elac, Bowers & Wilkins, Q Acoustics, KEF and more. Check out our guide to the best speakers and best active speakers to find the right pair for your turntable.

Do I need a phono stage for my turntable?

Yes, always. Every turntable will need a phono stage – whether that's a standalone unit or built into the turntable, or integrated into your amplifier or speaker – to be able to play a sound that you can hear through your speakers.

Why? The audio information stored in a record's groove can be in an area as small as a micron (one-thousandth of a millimetre), so the scale of the task to retrieve it and playback through your speakers is immense – one that your standard line-level stereo amplifier isn't able to do on its own.

The physical limitations of vinyl mean that the original audio signal has to be altered before it can be recorded onto its tiny grooves – low frequencies are reduced in level and the highs are boosted. This is where the phono stage (or phono preamp) comes in. It has to reverse the response built into it – one that boosts bass and flattens treble to exactly the right degree, which should result in a tonally even presentation for the audio signal. And it has to amplify the signal. The cartridge signals from tracking the groove can be as low as a thousandth of a volt (CD’s output is specified at 2V, for instance) so the signal has to be amplified massively before the line-level stage of a stereo amplifier can take over.

You can learn more about how a vinyl record makes a sound.

Are old vinyl players better than new turntables?

If you have an old record player, say a few years or decades old, the same principles apply: the build quality, the cartridge choice, how reputable the manufacturer was and the care it took in making the record player, and overall performance all matter. A well-made or high-end turntable should last you decades, if not a lifetime, as long as you still enjoy listening to it.

As long as you've kept the turntable in good condition over the years and paired it with capable matching electronics, it should still sound good. The very well-regarded Roksan Xerxes turntable, for instance, still sounds as good today as it did in the late 80s/90s, according to our reviewers.

New turntables have the advantage of refining a design with newer, cleverer materials or manufacturing processes. So they can sound cleaner and more precise with every new generation; in our experience, Rega and Pro-Ject turntables have generally improved with every iteration of their Planar and Debut ranges, respectively. Newer turntables these days also include extra features like Bluetooth streaming or USB recording – so it depends on what you require. 

Turntables generally have long shelf lives, and don't require software upgrades like digital-based products do. Long-standing models from Michell Engineering, Clearaudio and Linn still sound fantastic and perform beautifully today.

Recent updates

  • February 2024: Updated our advice and testing process, and added FAQ section to help buyers with the most asked questions about turntables.
  • November 2023What Hi-Fi? Award-winning products are labelled following the 2023 annual What Hi-Fi? Awards Best Buys and Product of the Year announcement.

MORE:

14 of the best turntable accessories for better vinyl sound

How to choose the right turntable

Partner your turntable with the best hi-fi speakers and best stereo amplifier

Kashfia Kabir
Hi-Fi and Audio Editor

Kashfia is the Hi-Fi and Audio Editor of What Hi-Fi? and first joined the brand over 10 years ago. During her time in the consumer tech industry, she has reviewed hundreds of products (including speakers, amplifiers and headphones), been to countless trade shows across the world and fallen in love with hi-fi kit much bigger than her. In her spare time, Kash can be found tending to an ever-growing houseplant collection and shooing her cat Jolene away from spinning records.

  • chichaz
    "The best record players 2022" The best record players 2022 redirects here.
    Anyway, I thought it interesting none of Mobile Fidelity's decks (StudioDeck, StudioDeck+, UltraDeck, PrecisionDeck) made the list.
    Reply
  • hybridauth_facebook_1496658100
    Also came out on spring 2021, the brand new Teac TN5-BB currently Teac’s top model, well built, no plastic (excepted the armrest clip) acryl platter, 3 speed, SAEC arm with Supra wiring and tuning possibilities such as height and removeable headshell (SME standard), auto-stop auto-lift (disengageable) and correct price regarding the build quality. The only minus was the standard pick-up Ortofon Red which is good but one might have hoped for something better. anyway I have mounted the fabulous AT VM740ML on mine and it’s now perfect!
    Reply
  • Rui
    i´m always wondering why they say this turntables are aceptable , there is a easy way to see if any turntable as aceptable sound ,

    i call aceptable to the cheapest good sounding turntable i heard in the 60´s ,70´s,80´s, and 90´s, so if you put a record and listen to it and when it´s over you change to cd and the sound seems horrible to the point of not hearing it at all ,rest 30 minuts and after the cd will sound like you´re used to,

    that´s how we see if a turntable as a minimum quality sound. i would prefer from all showed the technics SL-1500C but with any catridge except the 2Mred from ortofon ,never ever in my life i had heard such a bad cartridge,

    maybe the M75B from sure either than this but any cheap AT will sound great as it came with when released, but nagaoka would be my choice because they use to make very good cartridges to technics ,the MP-300 or 500 to meet the very know 270C cartridge and it´s stylus spherical or elyptical EPS-270ED or SD . I used to take them from the turntables and install a better one,

    for a litle money not thousands of €, but today i have maybe 4 of this and 3 ed stylys still new and closed in the box for each cartridge, today there are 30€ substitution stylus but are garbage ,i found one that costs around 70 or 80€ that is aceptable and doesn´t destroy the records ,

    this now sound amazing good but if i return to my 20´s were the basic cartridges that one would take and buy better, today after hearing a lot of new models i say the GRADO that costs around 5.000€ is nice.


    A new turntable ,as since 2020 i´ve been gathering components for a new system, i bought a modern turntable with aceptable sound the REGA P10.

    I have other new or recent the SL-1000G or R or GR, not sure that came with a built for it cartridge made by nagaoka ordered by technics or better, the ones that developed the turntable ,

    between other brands i have bought some components from Mark Levinson and some really good and very powerfull JBL speakers with a very nice wood work ,they are tall as me, 1.81 meter
    Reply