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Best gaming TVs 2020: 4K gaming TVs for PS5, Xbox Series X and all current consoles

Best gaming TVs Buying Guide: Welcome to What Hi-Fi?'s round-up of the best gaming TVs you can buy in 2020.

If you want to amp up your favourite video game, it's worth splashing out on a bigger, brighter telly, and one with deeper blacks that will immerse you in the action.

Broadly speaking, a TV that's generally great should also be great for games, but there are a few gaming-specific features to look out for, particularly if you're looking at investing in a PS5 or Xbox Series X. The big one is input lag, which tells you how long your gamepad button presses will take to appear as onscreen actions. Lower is better, but anything below 40ms will be imperceptible to almost all gamers, and 20ms or less is lightning-fast.

A few next-gen gaming features are starting to appear, too – Variable Refresh Rate (VRR), Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) and HFR (High Frame Rate) are all part of the HDMI 2.1 spec, but are now available via plenty of TVs with HDMIs that are certified as 2.0. 

VRR matches the TV's refresh rate to the frame rate being output by the console in real-time, resulting in a smoother, faster gaming experience. The Xbox One X and One S (and certain PCs) can output VRR now, and both the Xbox Series X and PS5 will take advantage of it.

ALLM is simpler: it just means that your TV will automatically switch to its 'game mode' to reduce input lag when it senses a game signal from your games console. It's also intelligent enough to switch game mode off again if you play a movie or TV show via your console.

Another feature that isn't used in current consoles but will be in the next generation is HFR (High Frame Rate), which in gaming is often referred to as 4K@120Hz. Put simply, this allows a TV to handle 4K games at frame rates of up to 120fps. It's currently rare to find a TV that can do this (most are limited to 60Hz) but you can expect more to turn up as HDMI 2.1 becomes more prevalent.

Those specific gaming features are all well and good, but focusing on specs alone really isn't wise: your new TV also needs a broad range of core skills. For example, it needs to have the punch and vibrancy to do justice to brighter, flashier games such as Fall Guys, but also a natural balance that doesn't oversaturate those tonally subtler blockbusters, such as The Last of Us Part II.

Black depth is important for delivering drama, too, but you want to be able to see plenty of detail in shadows, so avoid a TV with a reputation for crushing dark detail and be sure to tweak the brightness/gamma setting for your game – most titles have a specific option for this.

HDR is a must, of course, as all versions of the PS4 and the Xbox One X and One S output HDR (as will their successors), and it would be a mistake not to get a 4K screen, even if you don't yet have a 4K console. The good news is that it's now pretty hard to buy a TV that doesn't have 4K and HDR.

But what about 8K? We know that both the PS5 and Xbox Series X will be capable of outputting an 8K signal, but that doesn't actually mean 8K games are suddenly going to start appearing. In fact, in the recent game-focused events run by both PlayStation and Xbox, 8K hasn't been mentioned once. 4K@120Hz has been, though.

Our guess is that the focus will be on higher frame rates in the short term, with higher resolutions coming later. Even then, native 8K gaming seems unlikely. It's widely believed that neither console has the processing power to run blockbuster games at that resolution. We might, though, see games appear that dynamically scale at resolutions above 4K before being output as an 8K signal, much as the current PS4 Pro and Xbox One X handle 4K on many games (truly native 4K games are still fairly rare).

In other words, while 8K should perhaps be at the back of your mind, we don't think it's essential that you buy an 8K TV right now. Such sets will likely be much, much more affordable by the time 8K gaming becomes a serious concern.

Right, that's the broad strokes. Want some specific gaming TV recommendations? Read on.

Best gaming TVs 2020: 4K gaming TVs for PS5, Xbox Series X and all current consoles

(Image credit: LG / Paatal Lok, Amazon Prime)

1. LG OLED55CX

The core model in LG’s 2020 OLED TV range is the best gaming TV you can buy.

SPECIFICATIONS

Screen size: 55in (also available in 48in, 65in, 77in) | Type: OLED | Backlight: Not applicable | Resolution: 4K | HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision | Operating system: webOS | HDMI inputs: 4 | ARC/eARC: eARC | Input lag: ~13ms | Variable Refresh Rate (VRR): Yes | Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM): Yes | 4K@120Hz: Yes | Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 71 x 123 x 4.7cm

Reasons to Buy

Picture is exciting but natural
Improved motion and dark detail
Great gaming features

Reasons to Avoid

Missing UK catch-up apps

Not only is the LG CX a superb all-round performer for everything you watch, it's got all of the gaming credentials you could possibly need.

All three current formats of VRR are supported, as are ALLM and 4K@120Hz. Input lag is an almost impossibly fast 13ms, too. There's simply no better specified TV when it comes to gaming.

Of course, it's got the usual perfect black depth that you get from OLED TVs, but there's greater shadow detail than LG's 2019 models could manage, ensuring you're less likely to be caught out by an enemy camping in the gloom. And while the set isn't as ultimately bright as a Samsung QLED, it produces surprisingly punchy highlights in otherwise dark scenes, which makes for some brilliantly exciting imagery.

The set's one drawback isn't gaming related: it's lacking all of the UK's core catch-up apps. If you don't see that as an issue and you're a big gamer, this is the best TV you can buy.

If a 55in TV is a bit too big for your room, you can now buy a 48in version of the CX (the OLED48CX). There are also 65in and 77in versions if you're looking to go bigger.

Read the full LG OLED55CX review

Read the full LG OLED48CX review

Best gaming TVs 2020: 4K gaming TVs for PS5, Xbox Series X and all current consoles

(Image credit: Future / How to build a girl, Amazon Prime)

2. Samsung UE55TU8000

It's lacking some next-gen specs, but this is a great budget TV for gaming.

SPECIFICATIONS

Screen size: 55in (also available in 43in, 50in, 65in, 75in and 82in) | Type: LCD | Backlight: Edge LED | Resolution: 4K | HDR formats supported: HDR10, HDR10+, HLG | Operating system: Tizen | HDMI inputs: 3 | ARC/eARC: eARC | Input lag: ~10ms | Variable Refresh Rate (VRR): No | Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM): Yes | 4K@120Hz: No | Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 71 x 123 x 6cm

Reasons to Buy

Brilliant HDR picture
Bags of tonal detail
ALLM and super-low input lag

Reasons to Avoid

Not the brightest
Uninspiring sound
No VRR or HFR

Samsung's 8-series has traditionally been positioned just below the company’s glamorous range-topping QLEDs. In the past, it has proven to be the sweet spot where picture quality and price intersect to maximum effect. And so it proves once more.

The UE55TU8000 (known as the UN55TU8000 in the US) is astonishingly good value. For comparatively very little money you're getting a 55-inch TV that performs brilliantly, particularly with HDR content, and boasts the best, most app-laden operating system available at any price.

It is missing support for VRR and 4K@120Hz, but ALLM is on board and input lag is vastly lower than that of many sets costing four times as much. If you're a gamer on a tight budget, we've not found a better option.

Read the full Samsung UE55TU8000 review

Best gaming TVs 2020: 4K gaming TVs for PS5, Xbox Series X and all current consoles

(Image credit: Samsung / Truth Seekers, Amazon Prime)

3. Samsung QE55Q90T

Samsung’s top 4K model for 2020 is punchy, feature-packed and good value.

SPECIFICATIONS

Screen size: 55in (also available in 65in, 75in) | Type: QLED | Backlight: Direct LED | Resolution: 4K | HDR formats supported: HDR10, HDR10+, HLG | Operating system: Tizen | HDMI inputs: 4 | ARC/eARC: eARC | Input lag: ~11ms | Variable Refresh Rate (VRR): Yes | Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM): Yes | 4K@120Hz: Yes | Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 71 x 123 x 3.5cm

Reasons to Buy

Brilliantly bright and punchy
Improved motion and sound
Great gaming features

Reasons to Avoid

OLEDs offer better blacks

The Samsung Q90T is a slightly tricky proposition. It’s the top 4K TV in Samsung’s 2020 TV range (along with the Q95T), but as a result of the company’s increased focus on 8K models, it’s also less of a flagship set than last year’s Q90R thanks to a reduction in backlight dimming zones.

Whether you consider the Q90T to be the true successor to the Q90R or not, it is a better TV overall. It has a more natural balance, significantly better motion and a much-improved sound system. It’s true that it doesn’t go quite as bright or quite as black but, in fairness to Samsung, the Q90T is also more aggressively priced.

Besides, the Q90T is second to none when it comes to gaming specs. VRR, ALLM and 4K@120Hz make it perfectly equipped for this console generation and the next, and input lag of just 11ms means it's never going to hold you back.

It's also worth remembering that while the Q90T doesn't go quite as bright as its predecessor, it's still vastly more punchy than any OLED, and there's an addtional vibrancy to colours that lends itself well to games.

If you've got the budget for a premium gaming TV, you should definitely check the Q90T out before handing any money over for the LG CX – both are brilliant and just have different characteristics.

Read the full Samsung QE55Q90T review

Best gaming TVs 2020: 4K gaming TVs for PS5, Xbox Series X and all current consoles

(Image credit: Samsung / The Last Narc, Amazon Prime)

4. Samsung QE55Q80T

This 2020 TV is an excellent performance-per-pound proposition, particularly for gamers.

SPECIFICATIONS

Screen size: 55in (also available in 49in, 65in, 75in, 85in) | Type: QLED | Backlight: Direct LED | Resolution: 4K | HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, HDR10+ | Operating system: Tizen | HDMI inputs: 4 | ARC/eARC: eARC | Input lag: ~10ms | Variable Refresh Rate (VRR): Yes | Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM): Yes | 4K@120Hz: Yes | Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 71 x 123 x 5.4cm

Reasons to Buy

Punchy but natural picture
Solid, spacious sound
Excellent gaming features

Reasons to Avoid

Occasionally overcooks colours
Slightly exaggerates film grain

This new Samsung QLED sets a formidable benchmark for mid-range TVs in 2020, offering a high-end performance at a very reasonable price.

The Q80T looks much like any other Samsung QLED, although it is a little bit chunkier than the Q90T above. There's nothing wrong with the specs of those connections, either: the four HDMI inputs support the key features of HDMI 2.1, such as eARC, ALLM, VRR and 4K@120Hz.

4K HDR streaming is available via the likes of Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, Disney+, Apple TV+. In fact, the app support is superb, with pretty much every video and music streaming site you can think of on offer here. The only feature gap of real significance is the lack of Dolby Vision.

A simple TV to set-up when it comes to getting the best possible picture, the Q80T ultimately delivers a brilliantly dynamic image with deep black levels, excellent contrast and neutral but vibrant colours. While there are rare occasions when watching HDR that a skin tone seems slightly overcooked, the colour balance is a great strength overall, while motion is handled confidently and smoothly throughout our testing. And while we'd recommend a soundbar or some speakers, Samsung's Object Tracking Sound technology provides open, engaging audio.

The Q90T is the better TV in terms of contrast and colours, but it's a not a huge step up, so if your budget falls just short of a full flagship model, the Q80T is a superb choice.

Read the full Samsung QE55Q80T review

Best gaming TVs 2020: 4K gaming TVs for PS5, Xbox Series X and all current consoles

(Image credit: Future / Jack Ryan, Amazon Prime)

5. LG OLED65B9PLA

LG's most affordable current OLED model is a cracking choice for gamers.

SPECIFICATIONS

Type: OLED | Resolution: 4K | Backlight: Not applicable | HDR formats: HDR10, Dolby Vision, HLG | Operating system: webOS | HDMI inputs: 4 | Input lag: ~13ms | Variable Refresh Rate (VRR): Yes | Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM): Yes | Dimensions (hwd) w/o stand: 83 x 145 x 4.7cm

Reasons to Buy

Excellent colour and detail
Strong upscaling
Super-low input lag

Reasons to Avoid

Average dark/light production
Audio a touch muffled

The LG B9 is a mixture of the old and the new – it combines the company's 2018 processor with its 2019 OLED panel. This makes it the most affordable LG OLED you can currently buy and a tempting proposition indeed.

The picture is natural, colourful and well-measured for contrast whether you’re watching in 4K or upscaling from HD, and whatever processor power is missing certainly won't ruin your TV experience. Input lag is super-low, too, and ALLM and VRR are both supported.

LG's 2020 models are undeniably better, and it’s worth paying the extra for one of those if you can, but the B9 has been heavily discounted since last year and represents exceptionally good value while it's still available.

Read the full LG OLED65B9PLA review

Best gaming TVs 2020: 4K gaming TVs for PS5, Xbox Series X and all current consoles

(Image credit: LG / Bosch, Amazon Prime)

6. LG OLED65GX

LG’s 2020 OLED TV range gets off to a superb start with this beautifully designed ‘Gallery’ model

SPECIFICATIONS

Screen size: 65in (also available in 55in, 75in) | Type: OLED | Backlight: Not applicable | Resolution: 4K | HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision | Operating system: webOS | HDMI inputs: 4 | ARC/eARC: eARC | Input lag: ~13ms | Variable Refresh Rate (VRR): Yes | Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM): Yes | 4K@120Hz: Yes | Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 83 x 145 x 2cm

Reasons to Buy

Consistent, natural performance
Great gaming features
Lovely design

Reasons to Avoid

Currently lacks UK catch-up apps
No feet or pedestal in the box

While most people will be more than satisfied with one of LG's C-class models, which are the most affordable sets with all of the company's best picture processing, this GX takes that same picture and feature set (including VRR, ALLM and 4K@120Hz), and adds more powerful sound and a beautiful design.

This is LG's 'Gallery' model, and as such is entirely intended for wall-mounting. You don't even get a stand in the box (although feet can be bought separately), with a low-profile mount provided instead. The set is a uniform 2cm deep, which is exceptionally slim. The CX, by comparison, is 4.7cm deep at its thickest point.

Picture-wise, LG has taken the exemplary performance of its 2019 OLEDs and improved it in a few key areas, with dark detail, colour richness and motion handling all getting a worthwhile boost. The set sounds decent, too, particularly for one with essentially invisible speakers.

The only issue for UK buyers is the current lack of catch-up apps such as BBC iPlayer. That won't impact your gaming sessions, but if you use your TV for more than just gaming - and at this level we hope you do - it's a factor worth considering.

Read the full LG OLED65GX review

Best gaming TVs 2020: 4K gaming TVs for PS5, Xbox Series X and all current consoles

(Image credit: Future / El Corazón de Sergio Ramos, Amazon Prime )

7. Samsung QE65Q95T

All the gaming greatness of the Q90T with some additional One Connect loveliness.

SPECIFICATIONS

Screen size: 65in (also available in 55in, 75in, 85in) | Type: QLED | Backlight: Direct LED | Resolution: 4K | HDR formats supported: HDR10, HDR10+, HLG | Operating system: Tizen | HDMI inputs: 4 | ARC/eARC: eARC | Input lag: ~10ms | Variable Refresh Rate (VRR): Yes | Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM): Yes | 4K@120Hz: Yes | Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 83 x 145 x 3.5cm

Reasons to Buy

Rich, solid, natural picture
Excellent gaming features
Improved sound

Reasons to Avoid

‘Predecessor’ was punchier

If you love the sound of the Q90T above but like the idea of connecting all of your kit via an external unit that can be easily hidden away, then the Q95T is for you. A more stylish remote and Samsung's unique One Connect system are the only upgrades you get for spending the extra on the Q95T, but for some they'll be worth the money.

The One Connect system really is awesome. Instead of your consoles and other sources being plugged directly into the back of the TV, they go into an external box that's then connected to the screen via a very long and almost impossibly thin cable. This cable even carries the power, so the display itself doesn't need to be connected directly to a wall socket.

It's genius and it makes for an incredibly neat setup if you're wall-mounting, so if you want all of the Q90T's excellent gaming credentials with an extra helping of wow factor, this is the TV to get. 

Read the full Samsung QE65Q95T review

Best gaming TVs 2020: 4K gaming TVs for PS5, Xbox Series X and all current consoles

(Image credit: Sony / Hanna, Amazon Prime)

8. Sony KD-49XH9505

The XH9505 is the latest in a long line of superb 49in TVs from Sony.

SPECIFICATIONS

Screen size: 49in (also available in 55in, 65in, 75in 85in) | Type: LCD | Backlight: Direct LED | Resolution: 4K | HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision | Operating system: Android TV 9.0 | HDMI inputs: 4 | ARC/eARC: eARC | Input lag: ~21ms | Variable Refresh Rate (VRR): No | Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM): No | 4K@120Hz: No | Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 63 x 109 x 6.9cm

Reasons to Buy

Punchy, rich picture performance
Vastly improved sound
Low input lag

Reasons to Avoid

Same design as last year
Some backlight bloom
No VRR or ALLM

There's a lot of pressure on the 49in KD-49XH9505 (XBR-49X950H in the States), as all three of its predecessors have taken home What Hi-Fi? Awards.

The company has basically reused the shell of last year's KD-49XG9005, which is a bit of a shame as it's fairly thick and has awkward-looking feet that give the set an overly wide footprint. But the set looks fairly smart in its own right. You do also get a better remote that's neatly laid out and doesn't require line of sight in order to send commands to the TV.

Most importantly, last year's shell has been stuffed with upgraded kit, including Sony's flagship processor, the X1 Ultimate, which brings with it lots of picture improvements. All told, this is a punchier and more richly coloured performer than its predecessor, with more dark detail and the excellent motion processing for which Sony is renowned. It sounds impressively weighty and solid, too.

Unfortunately, Sony hasn't seen fit to add support for VRR or ALLM, but the low input lag and all-round impressive picture performance still make it a decent choice for gamers looking for a 49in TV that's more premium than most.

Read the full Sony KD-XH9505 review