What Hi Fi Sound and Vision Fri, 25 Oct 2013, 11:53am

Tannoy Precision 6.2

Tested at £1700
100100
5

The 6.2s are beautifully balanced and hugely listenable speakers, with a stereo image to die for

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For

  • Excellent build quality
  • Attractive design
  • Wide, focused soundstage
  • Brilliant integration
  • Detailed, dynamic and entertaining sound

Against

  • Nothing of note

Precision by name, and suitably precise by nature, the Tannoy Precision 6.2 speakers are charming, fantastic-sounding floorstanding speakers. You should consider them one of the best pairs of speakers at this price.

Tannoy Precision 6.2

Out of the box, the Tannoy Precision 6.2 speakers look distinctive and attractive. The curved sides to the cabinet, the clean-looking aluminium trim around the drive units and the chunky terminals on the rear all combine to create an impression of quality.

MORE: Tannoy Precision 6.1 review

The splendid-looking satin dark-walnut veneer, pictured here, gives the finishing touch (high-gloss dark walnut and high-gloss black are also available).

The dedicated plinths complement the solid, sturdy speaker design. The spikes are adjusted from above using the supplied key, so you don’t have to mess about tipping the speakers over to balance things out.

Unusually, the Precision 6.2s give you the option of mass-loading the cabinet. Unscrewing the plinth reveals a round panel, which covers a cavity into which you can pour suitable material, such as dry sand. Tannoy claims this helps lower the centre of gravity and improve stability (and hence sound quality).

The top drive-unit is one of Tannoy’s trademark Dual Concentric drivers which sees a 25mm titanium-dome tweeter recessed in a 6in paper-pulp cone. Tannoy claims this helps with focus, integration and dispersion. Below the Dual Concentric sits a dedicated 15cm bass driver.

Performance

During testing, we found that placing the Tannoys 60cm or so away from a wall has them singing at their finest, and a little toeing-in helps to firm up the stereo image.

And what an image! The Precision 6.2s paint a beautiful sonic picture. The speakers position the various elements of a track in an accurate, cohesive manner, allowing the listener to soak up all the detail on offer.

Tannoy Precision 6.2

Play Daft Punk’s Lose Yourself To Dance, and instruments are extremely well organised. Although the Tannoy’s excellent dispersion means you get a very broad soundstage, all the instruments and vocals hang there perfectly. The sparkly starburst that makes an appearance on the track flits across your listening position with deftness and subtlety.

MORE: Best speakers: Awards 2013

There’s a great, funky flow to the tune with Pharell’s vocal featuring prominently, but it still integrates perfectly with guitar, percussion and background singers. The 6.2s communicate the subtle dynamics of the track with ease.

The Tannoys take well to bi-wiring, too. Not all speakers do – some can lose a little cohesion and focus. But, if anything, the 6.2s become even more listenable when connected in this way.

Tannoy Precision 6.2

There’s a greater expanse of sound, but they still manage to keep that superb stereo image intact. In fact, the soundstage sounds a little more three-dimensional, giving the dynamics greater reach and making you feel even more connected with the music.

And, although there is the option of mass loading, we never felt that the Tannoys were lacking in bass quantity or quality. Positioning them a little closer to a rear wall can always add a little reinforcement should you require it.

Verdict

We’re yet to review the larger Tannoy Precision 6.4 speakers, which sit at the top of the new Tannoy Precision range, but we wouldn’t be surprised if the 6.2 is the sweetspot for this range – they are beautifully balanced and hugely listenable speakers, with a stereo image to die for.

 

AWARDS 2013: See all 99 award-winning products

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