What Hi Fi Sound and Vision Thu, 17 Mar 2011, 11:01am

LG HX995TZ

Tested at £800
80100
4

Very good, but there’s better value and picture quality elsewhere

Write your own review

For

  • Immersive sound
  • vibrant 2D and 3D picture
  • very good specification

Against

  • Pricey in the current climate
  • image quality could be improved

The LG HX995TZ’s brand spanking newness is reflected in its price – it’s not a cheap piece of kit.

But, as is the way these days, it shouldn’t be long before we see the price dropping.

It tries hard to justify the price, though, and to a large extent it succeeds. From a design point of view, it’s quick to attract admiring glances.

The tall-boy speakers bring an air of elegance (once you’ve screwed together the stands, poles and speakers) and it’s nice to see a main unit that isn’t a flat box.

The icing on the cake is a row of swanky touch-sensitive buttons running along the top edge and a couple of HDMI inputs tucked away on the back. Wi-Fi comes built-in, but the LG goes one step further.

Subwoofer holds all the amplification
The subwoofer also harbors all the amplification, so you wire the speakers straight into it.

The main unit then transmits audio data to the sub (up to a range of 20m), thus preventing the cables from getting tangled up with any other kit.

Speaker calibration is done manually, so you could do with the help of a sound pressure level metre. But going this extra mile is worth it, as the LG produces a hugely convincing surround sound field.

Drama and dynamics are high on the agenda but the system can still pick out nuances and create
an atmosphere without a constant supply of bangs and crashes.

An immersive performance
Effects steering is impressive, too. During Transformers: Revenge Of The Fallen, sounds fly across and between channels with serious intent, placing the listener in the heat of battle.

The sub injects a hefty dose of bass, but its presence is never unwelcome and doesn’t sound as unruly as some of its rivals. Dialogue sounds open and expressive, too.

Both 2D and 3D Blu-ray images set an early benchmark in quality thanks to their realistic, relatively noise-free picture.

It’s difficult to pick holes in, until you compare it with the most talented systems in the shops.

Hues aren’t quite as subtle and edges could be better-defined, but on the whole, this is a very enjoyable, if pricey, system.

See all our home cinema in a box Best Buys

Follow whathifi.com on Twitter

Join whathifi.com on Facebook

 

Latest offers