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Armour Home launches the world's biggest internet radio

Armour Home has expanded its Q2 range of internet radios with this new giant-sized model, the Q2XL, available now for £800.

It's a 1m cube, inside which are packed four powerful 30cm, 100W drive units and the resulting sound, claims Armour, is "quite phenomenal".

Like its smaller sibling, it's simple to use. After programming your four favourite stations via the USB connection, just tilt the radio up or down to change the volume.

To select a different station, just push the Q2XL over onto another of its four sides. And to turn it off, just get a friend to help you lift it onto its front.

For consumer convenience, the multiple, rechargeable onboard car batteries deliver up to 20 hours of "groundshaking music", it is claimed.

We've managed to get a photo of an early development mock-up of the Q2XL inside Armour's top-secret R&D lab.

Glenn McClelland, Armour's managing director and brand manager for all Q2 projects, says: "We've received a lot of feedback from Q2 owners telling us how pleased they are with their purchase, but also complaints that it's so cute and appealing, people keep walking off with them!

"The answer to this problem is the new Q2XL. It's designed to be too big and heavy to steal, and therefore perfect for all commercial applications."

The Q2XL comes in the same striking black, white, green, pink and blue finishes as the original Q2.

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Andy Clough

Andy is Global Brand Director of What Hi-Fi? and has been a technology journalist for 30 years. During that time he has covered everything from VHS and Betamax, MiniDisc and DCC to CDi, Laserdisc and 3D TV, and any number of other formats that have come and gone. He loves nothing better than a good old format war. Andy edited several hi-fi and home cinema magazines before relaunching whathifi.com in 2008 and helping turn it into the global success it is today. When not listening to music or watching TV, he spends far too much of his time reading about cars he can't afford to buy.