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Save up to £500 on Samsung Neo QLED 4K TVs

Samsung Neo QLED
(Image credit: Samsung)

Samsung is offering up to £500 cashback to anyone who pre-orders one of its 2021 Neo QLED televisions, either from its website or a number of participating retailers including Richer Sounds, Currys and Sevenoaks.

While MicroLED remains the preserve of the super-rich for now, Samsung is bringing Mini LED tech to its premium QLEDs, which it refers to as 'Neo QLEDs'.

Samsung explains that the majority of a typical LED's size is made up of its protective packaging and light-guiding lens, both of which it's done away with for its so-called 'New LEDs'. Not only that, it's also miniaturised the LEDs themselves, to quite astonishing effect.

The best Samsung Neo QLED cashback deals

Instead of a lens, Samsung's New LED backlights use a new 'micro layer' that guides the light through the quantum dots (which provide the set's colours). The result is apparently no light leakage or blooming, and because the New LEDs are so much smaller, significantly more of them can be packed in.

You can find out more about Neo QLED and the rest of the company's range on our Samsung 2021 TV lineup page.

Cashback will be available from £100 to £500 dependent on the size of the set you order, going in £100 increments from 50-inch to 85-inch, with the offer live now until 4th May.

All you have to do is make your claim within 60 days of purchase from a participating merchant – which include a number of local stores as well as the usual national retailers – and the cashback is yours.

MORE:

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  • kdbur
    The refusal to include Dolby Vision is ludicrous and means I will never entertain spending money, on a Samsung TV.
    Reply
  • kdbur said:
    The refusal to include Dolby Vision is ludicrous and means I will never entertain spending money, on a Samsung TV.
    Can’t you just watch it in HDR instead?
    Reply
  • kdbur
    ''Can’t you just watch it in HDR instead? ''
    Not when we are talking about £6,0000, televisions, no...

    Do you not think 'dolby vision' is better than standard HDR?
    Reply
  • kdbur said:
    ''Can’t you just watch it in HDR instead? ''
    Not when we are talking about £6,0000, televisions, no...

    Do you not think 'dolby vision' is better than standard HDR?
    Having owned quite a few LG OLED TVs, in my opinion HDR is better than Dolby Vision from my experiences. The Dolby Vision 4K Blu-rays I own were very poor quality compared to the HDR version on the same LG OLED TV.
    Reply
  • kdbur said:
    ''Can’t you just watch it in HDR instead? ''
    Not when we are talking about £6,0000, televisions, no...

    Do you not think 'dolby vision' is better than standard HDR?
    Which Samsung are you looking at because I would never spend £6000 on a Samsung either?
    Reply
  • kdbur said:
    ''Can’t you just watch it in HDR instead? ''
    Not when we are talking about £6,0000, televisions, no...

    Do you not think 'dolby vision' is better than standard HDR?
    If you want a big expensive Samsung why not go for this one?

    https://www.electricaldiscountuk.co.uk/qe75q900tstx-soloco-75inch-qled-uhd-8k-quantum-infinity-screen-smart-tv.html?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIkaKNmc2o7wIVj9_tCh2L-AKqEAQYCSABEgJrNfD_BwE#product-offers
    Put it in filmmaker mode you will be amply rewarded.
    Reply
  • kdbur
    gel said:
    Having owned quite a few LG OLED TVs, in my opinion HDR is better than Dolby Vision from my experiences. The Dolby Vision 4K Blu-rays I own were very poor quality compared to the HDR version on the same LG OLED TV.
    Reply
  • kdbur
    I have a Panasonic and I find streaming in dolby vision much better than HDR, only, content. I can tell when it is one or the other but I really cannot fathom how a maker of high level TV's can omit 'dolby vision' . I would excuse a maker omitting HDR10+ as there is not much content about. I would though, agree about the quality of some 4k blu rays, especially the 'restorations' which can be awful.
    Reply
  • kdbur said:
    I have a Panasonic and I find streaming in dolby vision much better than HDR, only, content. I can tell when it is one or the other but I really cannot fathom how a maker of high level TV's can omit 'dolby vision' . I would excuse a maker omitting HDR10+ as there is not much content about. I would though, agree about the quality of some 4k blu rays, especially the 'restorations' which can be awful.
    I have been appreciating Dolby Vision on Apple TV on my dad’s LG 65C9 though. I understand with Netflix Dolby Vision is really good too. I had an LG 65E6 OLED which eventually got screenburn and I think I right in saying it was the first generation of Dolby Vision and the 4K Blu-rays were grainy with a few strange things going on. Steve Withers on AVF wont touch a Samsung either without Dolby Vision too. Although he really wants one! So he must be seeing good things with Dolby Vision too.

    I have personally found HDR to be really good at all times though.
    Reply
  • abacus
    The reason for Dolby Vision is so that the HDR image is mapped to the limitations of the screen.

    Most HDR films are 1000 nits with a few at 4000nits and maybe the odd one at 10,000 nits, now as OLED is limited to about 700nits (The new Sony OLEDs claim 1300nits (But tests have shown this is in Vivid mode with approx. 750nits in film mode) most Samsung upmarket QLED TVs easily achieve 1400nits in film mode so remapping (Dolby Vision) is not needed for the vast majority of HDR films.

    Instead of looking for tick boxes on features, always try the TV out for yourself to see if the picture suits you, as in a lot of instances the features you believe you want are actually irrelevant.

    Bill
    Reply