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NBC warns YouTube TV users that they may lose access to its content in a dispute over payments

YouTube
(Image credit: YouTube)

NBC Universal has begun a campaign notifying subscribers of YouTube TV that a contract disagreement between the two companies could result in more than 14 of its channels being pulled from the streaming platform.

The present deal between NBCU and YouTube TV is due to expire Thursday, 30th September, and no new agreement is yet in place. In a statement, NBCU said that it is seeking "fair rates" from Google for YouTube TV's continued carriage of its portfolio but that the tech giant is "refusing to make a deal" and is willing to let its customers lose access to its programming.

In an unusual move, the network has launched a website relaying its dispute with Google, and warning of the imminent loss of NBC, Bravo, CNBC, E!, Golf Channel, MSNBC, Oxygen, SYFY, Telemundo, The Olympic Channel, Universal Kids, Universo, and USA Network from the video service. NBC Universal also urges subscribers to "take action now" by sending an autogenerated tweet to YouTube and has set up a search function to help viewers investigate alternative providers in their region.

Google has responded with a blog post in which it asks that "NBCU treats YouTube TV like any other TV provider" and is seeking "the same rates that services of similar size get from NBCU" so that they can continue to offer YouTube TV to members at a "competitive and fair price".

If the two sides are unable to reach an agreement by Thursday and NBC pulls its programming, then YouTube TV's monthly subscription fee will drop by $10, from $65 to $55. Google also points out that affected customers can sign-up to NBC's direct-to-consumer streaming service, Peacock, where they can continue watching NCBU content for $5 per month.

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Mary is a staff writer at What Hi-Fi? and has over a decade of experience working as a sound engineer mixing live events, music and theatre.