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Logitech Squeezebox Touch review

Following hard on the heels of the nifty Squeezebox Duet, Logitech's Squeezebox Touch is a neat way to create a multiroom system Tested at £259.00

Our Verdict

One of the most affordable and flexible ways to build a multiroom system

For

  • Great looks and build
  • big, bright touchscreen
  • raft of services
  • wi-fi direct

Against

  • Needs a computer with Squeezebox Server
  • not quite as musical as the Sonos

What Hi-Fi? Verdict

One of the most affordable and flexible ways to build a multiroom system

Pros

  • + Great looks and build
  • + big, bright touchscreen
  • + raft of services
  • + wi-fi direct

Cons

  • - Needs a computer with Squeezebox Server
  • - not quite as musical as the Sonos

Logitech's Squeezebox range has always impressed us, thanks to its combination of flexibility and affordability, and the new Touch is the most impressive member of the range yet.

Like the Duet before it, this is a media streamer that connects to your router using ethernet or built-in wi-fi, accesses all the digital music on your computer, then pumps it out to your existing amp or receiver via analogue, optical or coaxial connections.

Unlike the Duet, it has a 4.3in touchscreen and is clear, colourful and responsive. There's a remote, too – Sonos' equivalent unit, the ZP90, has no display or remote.

In action, the Touch can't quite match the Sonos' overall musicality, so while there's plenty of detail and weight to its delivery of Massive Attack's Pray For Rain, it lacks that last inch of attack and dynamic subtlety.

Beats Sonos for price and features
It's not far behind though, and considering that it beats the Sonos for price and features, that's very impressive.

One thing worth bearing in mind is that you must have Logitech's Squeezebox Server running on the PC that your music's stored on.

Alternatively, there are a handful of network-attached storage devices with it pre-installed (try Netgear), but installing it yourself is fiddly.

Still, that's only likely to put off a few people and, besides, streaming your own music is only one string to the Touch's bow: it can also access internet radio, Last.fm, MP3 tunes and the brilliant Napster, which offers direct streaming of thousands of tracks for just a fiver a month.

See all our music server/client reviews

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What Hi-Fi?

What Hi-Fi?, founded in 1976, is the world's leading independent guide to buying and owning hi-fi and home entertainment products. Our comprehensive tests help you buy the very best for your money, with our advice sections giving you step-by-step information on how to get even more from your music and movies. Everything is tested by our dedicated team of in-house reviewers in our custom-built test rooms in London and Bath. Our coveted five-star rating and Awards are recognised all over the world as the ultimate seal of approval, so you can buy with absolute confidence.


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