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Sony trademarks 'Hi-Res Audio', hints at PS4 support

A trademark filed by Sony Corporation in the US hints that support for high-resolution audio could be coming to a host of new devices, including the PlayStation 4.

The filing sees Sony trademark its 'Hi-Res Audio' logo, but also lists a number of 'goods and services' for its use.

Gaming sites, such as Dualshockers, have leapt on the inclusion of "computer game programs for home video game machines... hand-held games with liquid crystal displays". This could point to the inclusion of high-res audio on the PS4, PS Vita or even the forthcoming PlayStation TV.

MORE: High-resolution audio: everything you need to know

The Sony Music Unlimited streaming service is currently Sony's focus where music is concerned – could Sony be gearing up to include high-res files?

Qobuz is currently the only streaming service to support better than 320kbps quality audio on a subscription streaming service, offering CD-quality streams (as well as high-res downloads).

That said, the trademark ruling also lists "optical disc players, digital audio players, audio speakers, DVD players and recorders" and plenty more product categories besides. So it could simply be a case of Sony covering all potential bases. We shall see.

PlayStation TV, Sony's answer to Apple TV that'll also bring with it second room PS4 gaming, is due in the UK this Autumn, and is likely to be the next PlayStation product launch in the UK.

MORE: PlayStation 4 review

by Joe Cox

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Joe Cox

Joe is Content Director for Specialist Tech at Future and was previously the Global Editor-in-Chief of What Hi-Fi?. He has worked on What Hi-Fi? across print and online for more than 15 years, writing news, reviews and features. He has covered product launch events across the world, from Apple to Technics, Sony and Samsung, reported from CES, the Bristol Show and Munich High End for many years, and provided comment for sites such as the BBC and the Guardian. In his spare time he enjoys mixing vinyl and cycling.