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bigblue235's picture
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RE: Pioneer Kuro Problem & Warranty Issues

SPLAT wrote:
The Sale of Goods act doesn’t "cover it for 6 years", this is a myth. There is no provision for this in the Sale of Goods act for a “6 year warranty”.
What there is, is "time out" on taking legal action, which is 6 years and this would only work if you could prove that it had the fault at the point of sale. Which you only could do if you had not used the item for 3 years and could prove it. Even then, it's tenuous.

Sorry, whilst I agree with you that there's no 6 year warranty, the statutory rights that you're entitled to do last for the full 6 year period. That's the limitation period for bringing a dispute, it's not a 'time out'. If the product could be expected to last 6 years, you have statutory rights for that whole period. But it isn't the same as a warranty.

I think you're misunderstanding the definition of an inherent fault. You can obviously use the set, it doesn't have to be in unused condition. If there is a poor quality part or manufacture which leads to a failure, this was present in the set at purchase. It doesn't matter that it's now 3 years down the line, the item was defective at point of sale Smile

Quote:
This was a premium high-tech cutting edge piece of equipment. A Ferrari, not a Ford Focus.
You couldn't buy a Ferrari and drive it for 100,000 over 5 years and expect it to be as reliable a family car. You're unlikely to win in the county court with something outside of the warranty regardless of price and in some cases the higher price (and technology) makes this more unlikely.

The higher price makes it more likely that the OP would win a small claims case if the set has a genuine fault. Price paid is one of the main factors when working out if the product has had fair use. As such, a premium TV set is usually expected to last longer than a cheap one. Obviously it depends on what's wrong with the set, but if it's wear and tear I'd be amazed if a Small Claims judge didn't agree that the set had failed prematurely.

A warranty is irrelevant to how long a TV set should last. People do win Small Claims cases all the time for out of warranty goods.

People should have a look at the SOGA hub website, it explains all this stuff. The vast majority of stuff on the net about SOGA is inaccurate Smile

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RE: Pioneer Kuro Problem & Warranty Issues

bigblue235 wrote:

SPLAT wrote:
The Sale of Goods act doesn’t "cover it for 6 years", this is a myth. There is no provision for this in the Sale of Goods act for a “6 year warranty”.
What there is, is "time out" on taking legal action, which is 6 years and this would only work if you could prove that it had the fault at the point of sale. Which you only could do if you had not used the item for 3 years and could prove it. Even then, it's tenuous.

Sorry, whilst I agree with you that there's no 6 year warranty, the statutory rights that you're entitled to do last for the full 6 year period. That's the limitation period for bringing a dispute, it's not a 'time out'. If the product could be expected to last 6 years, you have statutory rights for that whole period. But it isn't the same as a warranty.

I think you're misunderstanding the definition of an inherent fault. You can obviously use the set, it doesn't have to be in unused condition. If there is a poor quality part or manufacture which leads to a failure, this was present in the set at purchase. It doesn't matter that it's now 3 years down the line, the item was defective at point of sale Smile

Quote:
This was a premium high-tech cutting edge piece of equipment. A Ferrari, not a Ford Focus.
You couldn't buy a Ferrari and drive it for 100,000 over 5 years and expect it to be as reliable a family car. You're unlikely to win in the county court with something outside of the warranty regardless of price and in some cases the higher price (and technology) makes this more unlikely.

The higher price makes it more likely that the OP would win a small claims case if the set has a genuine fault. Price paid is one of the main factors when working out if the product has had fair use. As such, a premium TV set is usually expected to last longer than a cheap one. Obviously it depends on what's wrong with the set, but if it's wear and tear I'd be amazed if a Small Claims judge didn't agree that the set had failed prematurely.

A warranty is irrelevant to how long a TV set should last. People do win Small Claims cases all the time for out of warranty goods.

People should have a look at the SOGA hub website, it explains all this stuff. The vast majority of stuff on the net about SOGA is inaccurate Smile

 

Quite.

And it's very often regurgitated and accepted as gospel.

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RE: Pioneer Kuro Problem & Warranty Issues

Sorry, I agree that you might not expect a premium TV like a Pioneer Kuro to breakdown after 3yrs (I hope not, I want mine to work longer than that...!), but as the product is over 6months old, then the onus is on the OP (i.e. the purchaser) to prove that the TV is faulty for SOGA provisions to apply, and he might need to get an expert opinion to prove this - which probably won't be cheap, and may or may not be reclaimable (depends if it went to court).

The extended warranty doesn't apply, as it was via a third party and Pioneer can be sticklers as the conditions for taking it out weren't met - which is a pain - and you would hope that nice Pioneer would see that this could cause them bad publicity...

It is probably worth checking if things are corrected with a new displayPort cable - as this is a cheap and relatively easy solution to check.

As it looks like the retailer has gone bust, then you will probably have to try to use the credit card company to try to get a (free) repair... Unfortunately, you don't have any direct recourse to go to the manufacturer, except by trying to get them to honour the extended warranty.

 

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RE: Pioneer Kuro Problem & Warranty Issues

scene wrote:
Sorry, I agree that you might not expect a premium TV like a Pioneer Kuro to breakdown after 3yrs (I hope not, I want mine to work longer than that...!), but as the product is over 6months old, then the onus is on the OP (i.e. the purchaser) to prove that the TV is faulty for SOGA provisions to apply, and he might need to get an expert opinion to prove this - which probably won't be cheap, and may or may not be reclaimable (depends if it went to court).

Usually about £50ish, and if a case is upheld it's refunded as the consumer shouldn't incur any costs Smile 

 

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RE: Pioneer Kuro Problem & Warranty Issues

The OP indicates that the company he purchased the TV from have ceased trading. The contract is with the supplier, not Pioneer so although morally one might suggest they should honour the guarantee, there is no legal case. One can only hope that the OP used a credit card to buy the TV in which case they can chase the credit card company as they are jointly liable - that is why one should always make large purchases with a credit card.

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RE: Pioneer Kuro Problem & Warranty Issues

bigblue235 wrote:

scene wrote:
Sorry, I agree that you might not expect a premium TV like a Pioneer Kuro to breakdown after 3yrs (I hope not, I want mine to work longer than that...!), but as the product is over 6months old, then the onus is on the OP (i.e. the purchaser) to prove that the TV is faulty for SOGA provisions to apply, and he might need to get an expert opinion to prove this - which probably won't be cheap, and may or may not be reclaimable (depends if it went to court).

Usually about £50ish, and if a case is upheld it's refunded as the consumer shouldn't incur any costs Smile 

 

That's nice to know - I knew it should be reclaimable, just not that cheap Smile

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RE: Pioneer Kuro Problem & Warranty Issues

SPLAT wrote:

You couldn't buy a Ferrari and drive it for 100,000 over 5 years and expect it to be as reliable a family car. 

Disagree - provided you adhere to the manufacturers service schedule.

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RE: Pioneer kuro

I have the message (the Ariel cable has short circuited check the cable and plug in the AC power supply again) this has come after plugging in an outdoor Ariel to receive freeview, I have a perfect picture and tis message disappears after a minute.

any ideas 

TM

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RE: Pioneer kuro

Try another aerial.

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RE: Pioneer Kuro Warranty Issues

Seeing as this thread has been revived recently, and, even though the OP doesn't seem to care about the replies everyone has taken the time to contribute here (given that the OP hasn't replied since)...

It has reminded me that I still need to complete and send in my own 5-year guarantee paperwork for my own new Panny plasma!

In so doing, because of this thread, I've just actually read the terms and conditions of this 5-year warranty! The conditions are pretty stiff...

1) All the paperwork, including a copy of your purchase receipt, must be sent in within 30 days of purchase. If you don't, or even if you did but they don't receive it (not that you'd know), the extended warranty is void.

2) If the application is incomplete or it gets delayed in the post (again, how would you know?), the extended warranty is void

3) They will process the application for warranty within 40 days. If you haven't got a certificate within 40 days, you have a 5-day window to complain. If you haven't received your certificate within 40 days, and complained within 45 days, the extended warranty is void. Are you going to remember in 40 days time that you're still waiting for a certificate, and have only 5 days to chase it?

My dealer tells me that the need for specifically applying for the extended warranty is A) to ensure the set you bought came from an approved dealer rather than some unauthorised person selling grey imports or one that came off the back of a lorry, and  Dirol as someone else already mentioned, the warranty is apparently underwritten by an insurance scheme rather than at the manufacturers cost (the manufacturer only pays a small premium to insure each set registered, and as this is at no cost to the end-user, they'll only pay to insure those sets bought through official channels). So if your set isn't registered it hasn't been insured, and thus the cost of repairs aren't covered. It's tough, but it's apparently not the manufacturers or dealers problem.

I remember on registering my last Panny Plasma that I had to complain about not having received a certificate in that 5-day window (I had written the closure date in my diary!); they apparently had logged the form, but had it down as a different model. Even so, they hadn't sent me my certificate, so I wonder if I hadn't called and got them to send the certificate if that set would now still be covered? Probably not.

 

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RE: Pioneer Kuro Problem & Warranty Issues

No TV should fail to operate propery in such a small time-scale tbh......

You should get a proper letter written via email and start with

 " My friends on What Hi-Fi and I  have debated this issue of my Brand New Pioneer TV failing after SUCH A SHORT TIME and.......... "

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RE: Pioneer Kuro Problem & Warranty Issues

Alantiggger wrote:

No TV should fail to operate propery in such a small time-scale tbh......

Isn't that why the manufacturer is prepared to pay to have your TV insured against failure? All they're asking, to cover their own backs, is that the buyer registers it so that it can be insured.

 

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