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RE: russ andrews torlyte versus

namefail wrote:

davedotco wrote:
Over the years I have worked out a number of simple tecniques that allow me to tune a system to get best results, and perhaps more importantly work out why a system is not performing to the standard expected.

Would you care to share your wisdom, I've been working on isolation tweaks with my Rega Planar 2 for the last month with fair results.

Rega players are easy.

Wall mount and use a shelf that is decoubled on spikes. If Rega still make their skeletal wall bracket, that works almost as well.

Do not, if you want the best from your player, place it on any heavy furniture.......  :shame:

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RE: russ andrews torlyte versus

CnoEvil wrote:

davedotco wrote:

Again, the effects of some supports are quite predictable but sometimes there are results that are, at first experience, counter intuitive. Sometimes you do just have to try it and see

That is what I'm trying to get at......I think we probably are not that far apart.

I am sure that we are not, I tend to be a bit more 'anal' but I am very pragmatic. 

Some years ago I was doing some turntable setup for a chap called Warren Stolmack, the Linn agent in Australia. I got him to import some basic Sound Organisation tables as there was nothing available locally to put your player on. This was quite successfull.

Then a local dealer started making his own table, to avoid being just a copy of the SO table, he avoided spikes throughout by fitting flat flanges to the top and bottom of the frame to maximise contact with the floor and to the top shelf. 

Completely the opposite of the 'point contact' of the SO table, yet it worked just as well, interesting....... :?

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RE: russ andrews torlyte versus

davedotco wrote:

Some years ago I was doing some turntable setup for a chap called Warren Stolmack, the Linn agent in Australia. I got him to import some basic Sound Organisation tables as there was nothing available locally to put your player on. This was quite successfull.

Then a local dealer started making his own table, to avoid being just a copy of the SO table, he avoided spikes throughout by fitting flat flanges to the top and bottom of the frame to maximise contact with the floor and to the top shelf. 

Completely the opposite of the 'point contact' of the SO table, yet it worked just as well, interesting....... :?

I had my Linn on a SO table, as that was where it sounded best.....still have two of them.

"We should no more let numbers define audio quality than we should let chemical analysis be the arbiter of fine wines."  Nelson Pass

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RE: russ andrews torlyte versus

CnoEvil wrote:

davedotco wrote:

Some years ago I was doing some turntable setup for a chap called Warren Stolmack, the Linn agent in Australia. I got him to import some basic Sound Organisation tables as there was nothing available locally to put your player on. This was quite successfull.

Then a local dealer started making his own table, to avoid being just a copy of the SO table, he avoided spikes throughout by fitting flat flanges to the top and bottom of the frame to maximise contact with the floor and to the top shelf. 

Completely the opposite of the 'point contact' of the SO table, yet it worked just as well, interesting....... :?

I had my Linn on a SO table, as that was where it sounded best.....still have two of them.

The basic SO table was very good.

Back in the day it was noticed that the LP12 sounded better on it's setup jig (a simple frame stand that lifted the player off the workbench to allow access underneath), obviously so when the player was placed back on the workbench. The simple, original SO table was derived from this.

Many attempts were made to improve on the original but few even matched it. It took the much later Mana stand to offer any real improvement, and that at a price.

With reference to the above post, the Rega players worked quite well if the floor was pretty solid, quite a job to get it to work on suspended floors but it always sounded best on a wall bracket with decoupled shelf.

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RE: russ andrews torlyte versus

davedotco wrote:
Do not, if you want the best from your player, place it on any heavy furniture.......  :shame:

Phew, dodged a finger there, unless a 4 tier Target stand from the early 90s counts. I got it around the time then 1st Mana stand appeared afaik. So it is double spiked, also I've called into use a couple of brand X floorstand mounts and an old mission isoplat to top it off. The FS mounts really helped in freeing the setup of a lumpy wooden sound that I was unaware of, until it was gone, made the deck sound more responsive and attacking, not sure what the isoplat brings to the party, but I hate to see things go to waste.

The Rega atm sits on the original MDF (?) shelve that target shipped it with, could any improvement be gleamed in changing that to another material? This may all sound a lill like I'm staring up me own bun hole here, but I do like to get the best sound I can with as little outlay as poss.

Sorry to the OP of this thread for the drift, just give me a nudge and I'll open a new thread. Also cheers Dave for your time and input, you notice that at no time have I mentioned blutac of plummers mate. Smile

 

 

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RE: Turntable support

If you want to play there are a number of things you can try.

Firstly, try removing all the other equipment from the rack, so that the player is the only piece on it. Do not use the isoplat, ever.

See what effect that has, it should tell you whether the 'mass loading' of your stand with your equipment is having an effect. Usually it does, not in a good way.

If the differences marginal than the spiked top board is doing it's stuff. To make it even more effective try some small metal disks between the spikes and the underside of the board, 5p coins will do as an experiment though smooth disks should be better.

Another trick to try is to use tiny cross head screws in the underside of the board so that the points of the spikes fit into the cross. This will couple the board nicely vertically but restrict lateral movement that you would get with a flat disc, may or may not be better.

If you are going to try anything under the player (not the isoplat) try another board spiked off the first.

Talking of screws, drive some into the floor so that the spikes on the bottom of the stands sit in their 'cross' too, rarely fails to give a marked improvement.

All of these changes will make differences and although going to such lengths might be considered obsessive it will teach you about the way turntables behave and the way they interact with their supports. For a vinyl enthusiast on a budget, this can be very helpful.

A final thought, as a general principle, any change that reduces the percieved bass output is a step in the right direction.

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cheers D

Thanks a lot for the advice Dave, looks like I have this weekends project.  :cheers:

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RE: Turntable support RE: Turntable support

 

davedotco wrote:

If you want to play there are a number of things you can try.

Firstly, try removing all the other equipment from the rack, so that the player is the only piece on it. Do not use the isoplat, ever.

See what effect that has, it should tell you whether the 'mass loading' of your stand with your equipment is having an effect. Usually it does, not in a good way.

If the differences marginal than the spiked top board is doing it's stuff. To make it even more effective try some small metal disks between the spikes and the underside of the board, 5p coins will do as an experiment though smooth disks should be better.

Another trick to try is to use tiny cross head screws in the underside of the board so that the points of the spikes fit into the cross. This will couple the board nicely vertically but restrict lateral movement that you would get with a flat disc, may or may not be better.

If you are going to try anything under the player (not the isoplat) try another board spiked off the first.

Talking of screws, drive some into the floor so that the spikes on the bottom of the stands sit in their 'cross' too, rarely fails to give a marked improvement.

All of these changes will make differences and although going to such lengths might be considered obsessive it will teach you about the way turntables behave and the way they interact with their supports. For a vinyl enthusiast on a budget, this can be very helpful.

A final thought, as a general principle, any change that reduces the percieved bass output is a step in the right direction.

I couldn’t wait till Saturday so tried a few of your suggestions out. 1st took out the isoplat and left in place the FS stands, and it sounded great. Then removed them and had a listen and preferred the previous arrangement. Now my records sound so much more alive, the rythmatical expression is almost sublime. The second track on Dals Cars’s LP is impressive, the mix during the chorus is very challenging to present clearly, it was clear. Godflesh’s opening on Streetcleaner, "Like Rats”, is like a sledgehammer, Thank you! 

 

 

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RE: Turntable support RE: Turntable support

namefail wrote:

 

davedotco wrote:

If you want to play there are a number of things you can try.

Firstly, try removing all the other equipment from the rack, so that the player is the only piece on it. Do not use the isoplat, ever.

See what effect that has, it should tell you whether the 'mass loading' of your stand with your equipment is having an effect. Usually it does, not in a good way.

If the differences marginal than the spiked top board is doing it's stuff. To make it even more effective try some small metal disks between the spikes and the underside of the board, 5p coins will do as an experiment though smooth disks should be better.

Another trick to try is to use tiny cross head screws in the underside of the board so that the points of the spikes fit into the cross. This will couple the board nicely vertically but restrict lateral movement that you would get with a flat disc, may or may not be better.

If you are going to try anything under the player (not the isoplat) try another board spiked off the first.

Talking of screws, drive some into the floor so that the spikes on the bottom of the stands sit in their 'cross' too, rarely fails to give a marked improvement.

All of these changes will make differences and although going to such lengths might be considered obsessive it will teach you about the way turntables behave and the way they interact with their supports. For a vinyl enthusiast on a budget, this can be very helpful.

A final thought, as a general principle, any change that reduces the percieved bass output is a step in the right direction.

I couldn’t wait till Saturday so tried a few of your suggestions out. 1st took out the isoplat and left in place the FS stands, and it sounded great. Then removed them and had a listen and preferred the previous arrangement. Now my records sound so much more alive, the rythmatical expression is almost sublime. The second track on Dals Cars’s LP is impressive, the mix during the chorus is very challenging to present clearly, it was clear. Godflesh’s opening on Streetcleaner, "Like Rats”, is like a sledgehammer, Thank you! 

Right. Now take everything bar the turntable off the rack. See what happens then.

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___

Mañana, I also tried to penny tick and its cleared up the top end. Smile

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RE: ___

any opinions on the opening question ? any body use either product ?

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RE: ___

anybody ?

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RE: RA torlyte vs townshend seismic isolation platform ?

mikefarrow wrote:

has any body tested/used either platform ? under which components ? results ? both claim simular sonic improvements but work in completely different ways. torlyte platform designed to channel vibrations out of components, via the use of hard oak cones. seismic platform designed to isolate components from floor bourne vibrations, with no additional cones needed. thanks for replies !

 

 

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RE: RA torlyte vs townshend seismic isolation platform ?

I think the deafening silence would suggest no Mike...

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RE: RA torlyte vs townshend seismic isolation platform ?

the record spot wrote:

I think the deafening silence would suggest no Mike...

i live in hope !

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