Sony Bravia NX800
Sony is promising 3D Bravia TVs, a 3D Blu-ray player and a host of wireless devices as part of its 2010 model range

Sony revealed a new range of Bravia TVs today at CES in Las Vegas, which included the flagship 3D LX900 Bravia which is released in the US in March, and is expected to go on sale in the UK this summer.

In terms of screen size, there are 40in, 52in and 60in LX900 models complete with high-end Bravia technology including 200 HZ MotionFlow and wireless connectivity.

In an effort to make the Bravia range easier to understand, Sony has split the new 2010 models into four categories – Signature, Cinematic, Presence and Essential – which, put simply, go from high-end to budget respectively.

The Essential range will include value features such as built-in DVD or Blu-ray players, while the high-end Signature TVs are 3D sets.

Active shutter technologyThe 3D Bravias use active shutter technology within the glasses which come as standard with the top-end Signature models, but are also available as an option further down the range should you wish to upgrade to 3D later.

More after the break

Similarly, the required 3D transmitter will be standard on the top-end Signature TVs, but optional on the 3D-ready Cinematic and Presence models.

Perhaps most surprising is the fact that the Bravias look distinctly different to traditional Sony Bravias with a 'monolithic' design alongside a six-degree backwards tilt which is, according to Sony Chairman Sir Howard Stringer, designed to address the issue of TV stands being too low in many households.

The new monolithic design concept is also used for Sony's new range of BD players and home cinema systems, which are all part of the same sleek family.

New 3D channels on the wayContinuing the 2010 3D TV push, Sony showed a 3D clip of the forthcoming BD release of Jimi Hendrix at Woodstock.

The archive looks excellent with a real depth to the crowd and stage, perhaps the most natural showcase for the format we've yet seen.

In other 3D content release news, Sir Howard Stringer also revealed two new 3D channels would be launching in association with Sony – Discovery 3D and ESPN 3D. You can read more about the Sony/Discovery/IMAX venture in our News story.

Sony again confirmed that the World Cup would be filmed in 3D and also that a Blu-ray disc of the event would be released, although no specific details were revealed.

Sony has set up a dedicated 3D department, called Sony Pictures Technology Centre, in California to work with third party film and TV producers. There's a newly formed Sony Blu-ray research and development group formed in Las Vegas too.

In short, Sony says it will "take the lead in 3DTV and no-one should be in any doubt where we're heading".

iPhone compatible Blu-ray playersElsewhere, Sony revealed three new Blu-ray players – BDP S770, BDP S570 and the BDP S370. All feature wireless internet capability and – a first for Sony – compatibility with Apple's iPhone and iPod Touch. You'll be able to control all players with your iPhone.

The Entertainment Database Browser from Gracenote allows you to seach for directors and actors online too, like an instant IMDB.

PS3 owners will be delighted to know that a forthcoming firmware update will mean the PS3 can play 3D films and games as standard.

And the PlayStation network, also known as PSN, will be rolled out to devices other than the PlayStation 3 with movie downloads available for wireless devices and Sony's new 'Dash', which is billed as a 'personal internet browser' and is like a larger, chunkier iPod Touch.

As CES continues, we'll bring you more on Sony's comprehensive line-up and more news directly from the show floor including some OLED 3D prototype TVs.

See our Sony blog for full details of the UK Bravia 2010 range

Watch our Sony CES video