Toshiba TVs
Plymouth plant's production moving to Poland, remaining staff will provide engineering support and refurbishment services

Toshiba has announced that it's ending production of TVs at its factory at Ernesettle, Plymouth – and that means 270 jobs will be lost at a plant which has already seen its workforce halved in recent years.

It also signals the end of TV manufacturing in the UK by the Japanese company, which last week announced its worst ever financial figures and plans to cut 3900 jobs worldwide on top of the 4500 temporary staff it's shed in the past year.

Back in January the company predicted a Y280bn (£1.9bn) loss for the financial year just ending; last week it upped that figure to Y350bn, or £2.3bn.

Toshiba has been manufacturing in Devon for 28 years, and staff were said to be shocked by the announcement made on Friday, which local commentators say could put an £80m hole in the city's economy.

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Production will be moved to the company's factory in Kobierzyce, Poland, with 50 staff being retained at Ernesettle to provide engineering and manufacturing back-up for the Polish plant, and handle the refurbishment of returned products.

Andy Bass, MD of Toshiba Information Systems (UK) Ltd, said the company “deeply regrets” the job losses. “We have 28 years of history with Plymouth, and are indebted both to the people who have worked with us over those years, and to the wider community.

"Toshiba has to keep its global manufacturing strategy under constant review in order to compete in a market which has been transformed in recent years by aggressive, price-driven competition.

“Two years ago we invested in a major LCD TV factory in Poland, supplying European products in tandem with the Plymouth factory. With the rapidly-changing global market, and with the unprecedented economic pressures we face, it makes strategic sense to centralise production management under one roof.”

The company said headquarters in Japan had decided to centralise European TV production at its factory in Poland, as part of a drive to save money.