THX launches mobile 'tune up' app for iOS devices

30 Jan 2013

THX has announced the launch of 'THX tune-up,' the company's first iOS app, designed to give users a hand to set up up their TVs, projectors and surround sound systems.

The app features custom-made video patterns, including sharpness, brightness and tint, as well as audio tests that can help with speaker assignment and phase.

To take advantage of the app you'll need either Apple TV or Apple's Digital AV Adapter (either lightning or 30-pin) and an HDMI cable to display the set-up pages on-screen. The app's compatible with iPad 2, 3, and 4, iPhone 4, 4S and 5 and the 4th/5th Gen iPod Touch all running iOS 5.1 or later, iPad mini with iOS 6 or later. There's no mention of an Android version, but we've asked the quesion.

UPDATE: we've been informed that an Android version is in the pipeline and will be available in the Spring.

We've been recommmending THX's set-up system, found in the menus of certain DVD and Blu-ray releases, for quite a while now. They're a good, accessible starting point for someone wanting to make a few basic tweaks, so we're interested to see how the app's going to shape up.

THX tune-up is £1.49 on the iTunes store.

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Comments

joemit wrote:
Shame the free offer expired on 4th Februaury but the What Hi-Fi e-mail was sent today, 6th February.  It's now £1.49 on the App store.

Apologies, but this was the earliest newsletter in which we could include it. Story above now amended.

Shame the free offer expired on 4th Februaury but the What Hi-Fi e-mail was sent today, 6th February.  It's now £1.49 on the App store.

Tried it at home myself last night, pretty good for picture settings. Only snag so far is that it won't recognise my speakers as a 5.1 set-up, only 2.0.

its actualy not that bad, for free. even over airplay !!. the best feature is the colour adjustment with built in red filter using your phone camera. shame tint isnt a feature we can use here in the UK (PAL). Tends to be disabled most of the time, unless you are watching an NTSC DVD or BLURAY or unless you have projecter that is.