Sony marks the Walkman phone's third birthday with three new models

22 Jul 2008

Sony W595
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To coincide with the Walkman phone's third birthday, Sony Ericsson has unveiled three new music mobile phones for release in the final quarter of this year.

The line-up comprises: the top-of-the-range W902 with five megapixel camera, 8GB Memory Stick Micro for storing up to 8000 songs, AD2P Bluetooth connectivity and FM radio; the W595 which can store and play around 1900 songs through its built-in stereo speakers and is equipped with a 3.2 megapixel camera, A2DP Bluetooth and FM radio; and the W302 with two megapixel camera, FM radio, Track ID and 512MB Memory Stick Micro.

"Since the launch of our first Walkman phone in 2005, Sony Ericsson has continued to pioneer a superior mobile music experience – and the 77 million Walkman phones sold to date are testament to this commitment," says Ben Padley, head of the music category at Sony Ericsson.

All three phones incorporate Sony's TrackID technology, SensMe (for matching your mood to the music), and Shake control to change tracks with the flick of your wrist.

They can play MP3 or AAC music files, and the flagship W902 also comes with Sony's HPM-77 premium headphones for superior sound quality. Sony claims the W902 delivers the same music performance as the newly-launched W980 model.

Like the W902, the W595 (pictured) has a 2.2in QVGA screen for better-quality video playback. And if you want to share your music, it has two headphone sockets so a friend can listen using an additional set of headphones.

And if you want to make even more of your mobile music collection, Sony Ericsson is introducing three new sets of stereo speakers, the MBS-200, MBS-400 and MPS-100, to connect to Walkman phones, plus a new range of Bluetooth and noise-cancelling headphones.

 

 

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Comments

When will Apple stick an FM (or better still a DAB) radio in an iPod. Does the Sony phone allow you to record to memory from the radio I wonder. It would be so nice to be able to do what I used to do with a radio-cassette. Downloads of BBC radio are very convenient but just not up to snuff when it comes to quality.