11:40 am

I'm blogging to you live from the annual summit of the DTG. Erik Huggers, director of BBC Future Media and Technology is giving the first keynote speech, on the future of television.

His initial comments are about the BBC's ideas about how the corporation can partner with the commercial sector, to 'help it through difficult times'. Cynics might suggest 'scrapping the licence fee' might do just that, but not me.

11:49am

Now he's talking about the failure of ' Project Kangeroo', the BBC's plan to partner with the biggest commercial broadcasters to provide online TV. Other projects are planned: he describes the BBC's position as: 'If our boat rises on the tide, then everyone's boat rises on the tide'.

More after the break

It seems the BBC's buzz phrase right now is 'sharing with the industry'. Interestingly, the assembled luminaries don't seem to be snorting with cynicism. Which is refreshing.

11:55am

Now he's trumpet-blowing for the iPlayer. Which is fair enough: it is great, after all. The compatibility between iPlayer and games consoles such as the Wii and the PS3, is central, he says.

Mobile phone compatibility, likewise. 'It is our intention to make the iPlayer universally available.' But it's difficult, he says. 'Already we have to support 14 flavours of video, and four flavours of DRM, just to make it work right now.'

12:00pm

'More than 96 per cent of iPlayer usage is streaming – not downloading. People want easily accessible media, and they want it right now.' Now Huggers is talking about a new announcement called 'Project Canvas'. Short film to explain it coming up...