Bryston aims to hold on to a slice of the digital music streaming market with the BDP-Pi, the successor to the BDP-1 and built upon the Raspberry Pi and HifiBerry Digi+ platform.

The BDP-Pi works in a similar vein to the BDP-1 in that you’ll need to connect it to a DAC before you play music through it. You can play audio files through any of the four USB inputs or stream internet radio or lossless Tidal files through the ethernet port.

Connecting to an external DAC should be pain-free thanks to a generous selection of S/PDIF, Toslink, USB and HDMI outputs. 

Bryston has managed to fit the same functionality of the BDP-1 into a casing that’s one third the size for the BDP-Pi. It now comes with the added benefit of a colour screen to display artwork or virtual VU meters and smartphone app control.

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The smaller size is possible thanks to Bryston using a Raspberry Pi computer board and HifiBerry Digi+ output board combination. The platform allows the BDP-Pi to run quickly and efficiently, so there shouldn’t be any lag in performance.

Roon Labs has also announced a software solution that can be used with the BDP-Pi which allows you to manage, store and playback your music library. 

The Bryson BDP-Pi is available in the US, priced $1295. UK pricing and availability has yet to be announced. 

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