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mattjax05's picture
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Gigabit Network Setup Help for Home

Hi all. 

I would like to increase the transfer speed of files from my laptop to readyNas Duo. My router is a BT Homehub 3 (The one with Infinity) so it's nas and laptop to router. The router only has one gigabit port so I guess I need a gigabit switch? I'm not sure if my laptop has a gigabit NIC how do I check for sure? I did connect it to router (in the gigabit port) but the laptop was only showing 100mbps. The cable I used said Cat5 on it BUT..... I used the same cable from router to Nas and the Nas software registered a 1000 Mbps??? Really confused on that one! The laptop is a cheap Dell and circa 3 years old but does have hdmi port not that that matters. If its not gigabit is there a way round it other than changing the card or replacing the laptop. 

 

Help appreciated please to setup a gigabit network I'm new to all this.

 

Cheers. Matt

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RE: Gigabit Network Setup Help for Home

Just a caution before spending too much on switches, network cards & cables - also check up on the max readwrite speeds to the NAS (writing is normally the slowest operation).  Offhand I don't know the specs of the Readynas, but often the actual read/write interface is your speed bottleneck, not your communication line.  

Also bear in mind that you have a read operation going on at the laptop end (when you are copying/transfering/backing-up files) which also has speed constraints based on the laptops HDD read specs.  

I found on my Synology DS 410 that as I added more HDDs to the RAID array - three of the four bays filled now- my speed of transferring data went up as the NAS could write to more than one of the drives at a time (but I have also upgraded to a gigabit switch and CAT5E cables throughout).

Steve

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RE: Gigabit Network Setup Help for Home

For windows

 

Control panel -> System -> Device Manager

Expand network devices - you are looking for mention of gigabit/GBE or simliar.

Fast Ethernet would be 100Mbs.

 

 

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RE: Gigabit Network Setup Help for Home

OK, the ReadyNAS duo has a Gigabit port - I have one and have a gigabit network.

I recommend (strongly) getting proper CAT6 cabling to be on the safe side, you can get away with fully (four wires) CAT5E, if it's good quality and the run is not to long.

Remember, if you're running cables from the router to a switch, or from one switch to another, strictly speaking they should be solid core, not patch cables.

I'd look at an unmanaged, auto-sensing, switch, something like the NetGear GS105 (5 port) or GS108 (8 port).

Re: Dell - either as previously suggested, or look the model number up on the internet...

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RE: Gigabit Network Setup Help for Home

Cheers guys for te assistance. Falling at the first hurdle my NIC on laptop is only fast Ethernet and no mention of 1 gigabit in the description. What's the cheapest way to get 1000mbps on lappy? 

Scene - what's the difference between solid and patch cables please performance wise? Cheers.

Finally I am getting approx 10MB/s ( which I assume is 80mbps) on drag and drop tests not bad for 100mbps network. What would one might expect to get on 1000mbps network?

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RE: Gigabit Network Setup Help for Home

Doesn't really matter how fast you can transmit the data if your read / write operations at either end can't keep up - typically this is going to be your overall limiting factor.   Even SSD with no moving parts seem to max out at read speeds of 350 MB/s with slower write speeds.

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RE: Gigabit Network Setup Help for Home

Mr Steve wrote:

Doesn't really matter how fast you can transmit the data if your read / write operations at either end can't keep up - typically this is going to be your overall limiting factor.   Even SSD with no moving parts seem to max out at read speeds of 350 MB/s with slower write speeds.

Presumably the speed shown takes into account of read/write operations either end so my 10MB/s is fact and after accounting for limiters in relation to hardware either end of the transmission. And do you mean 35MB/s not 350MB/s???

Cheers.

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RE: Gigabit Network Setup Help for Home

Performance wise, over a short run, a multi-strand patch cable and a solid core will perform pretty much the same, it's over distance you'll notice and you'll get poorer signal and dropoutts. The spec allows for a max length of 100m of CAT6, consisting of 90m of solid core between patch panels(or switches, etc) and 10m of patch cable total between a panel and device. Basically, if you're total length of cable is less than 10m, you can use all patch cable.

As for getting gigabit Ethernet on your laptop. If you've got a PC card slot (not an SD one), by a gigabit PC card, failing that, I believe you can buy gigabit Ethernet USB dongles.
. As for speed, a gigabit network theoretically allows for 2gb speed in full duplex mode, with the possibility of jumbo far,ss to reduce fragmentation, which does speed up video strreaming. Even if you can only get 300mb/s write speed to your disk, if you've got a decent wadge of memory in your laptop, this will act as fast cache, which means the disk speed is probably immaterial.

I've upgraded to gigabit, and I've found all my devices work faster and music, video, etc, is smoother. The limiting factor does seem to be mostly lack of memory in some old laptops.

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RE: Gigabit Network Setup Help for Home

also look at changing the memory on the Duo to 1 Gb if you have not already done so.

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RE: Gigabit Network Setup Help for Home

By the sounds of it RAM is a very important factor. My laptop has 1gb my Nas has 256mb. Is the RAM more important in transfer speeds than say the computers processor. Am I right in saying the limiting factor is getting the data from the RAM to the HardDrive? 

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RE: Gigabit Network Setup Help for Home

well Netgear say they have seen it work upto 12% faster. but this is the NAS operating system.

 

but what are you really wanting to speed up?

 

how fast you can move files from your lap top to your NAS or the streaming speed?

 

what issues have you actually got?

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RE: Gigabit Network Setup Help for Home

nads wrote:

well Netgear say they have seen it work upto 12% faster. but this is the NAS operating system.

 

but what are you really wanting to speed up?

 

how fast you can move files from your lap top to your NAS or the streaming speed?

 

what issues have you actually got?

 

No issues at the moment as I only stream/transfer music but I would like to start streaming movies (DVD and Blu Ray) and I have just acquired a WDTV live. I've read that streaming via a 100mbps network will be fine so that wont be an issue but I'd like the transfer of files to the Nas speeded up which is where the gigabit network comes into play. 

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RE: Gigabit Network Setup Help for Home

One thing that gigabit will give you is bandwidth, which at the end of the day is what most people really need, they just don't know it.

Yes, 100Mb/s will stream a movie just fine...

... but then you start ripping a CD at the same time...

... and someone's listening to music in the kitchened (from the NAS)...

... oh yes, you're also surfing the net.

And suddenly the film starts stuttering and going blocky. You've used up your bandwidth, you're probably only getting 20Mb/s.

So if you've got lots of devices on your network, you want the bandwidth. At last count I had 15!

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RE: Gigabit Network Setup Help for Home

scene wrote:

One thing that gigabit will give you is bandwidth, which at the end of the day is what most people really need, they just don't know it.

Yes, 100Mb/s will stream a movie just fine...

... but then you start ripping a CD at the same time...

... and someone's listening to music in the kitchened (from the NAS)...

... oh yes, you're also surfing the net.

And suddenly the film starts stuttering and going blocky. You've used up your bandwidth, you're probably only getting 20Mb/s.

So if you've got lots of devices on your network, you want the bandwidth. At last count I had 15!

Another incentive to upgrade. Will I still get the increased bandwidth if my network speed is reduced to 100mbps by say hardware which doesn't support 1000mbps.

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RE: Gigabit Network Setup Help for Home

Yes - with caveats. The main one being that you need to ensure you have good auto-sensing switches - otherwise (like with WiFi) the whole network gets dragged down to 100Mb/s - which is a pain.

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RE: Gigabit Network Setup Help for Home

scene wrote:

Yes - with caveats. The main one being that you need to ensure you have good auto-sensing switches - otherwise (like with WiFi) the whole network gets dragged down to 100Mb/s - which is a pain.

Thanks. So as I see it my setup would be Router (bt homehub) - Gigabit switch (Netgear as above) then all hardware to switch all via cat5e or 6 cable. Just to confirm if any one piece of hardware attached to the switch is not gigabit rated the whole speed is reduced to 100mbps? If this is true I have a SB Touch which is only 100mbps so how would that work (two separate networks?) but in any case the extra bandwidth which gigabit networks provide will be available to me. 

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