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Could you live on £26000 ?
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RE: Could you live on £26000 ?

£26000 a month, you mean? Willing to give it a try, if you provide the cash-flow.

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RE: Could you live on £26000 ?

Well I live in Bath which is pretty expensive, and I can manage well within my means on 16K a year- 26K would be dream money for me!

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RE: Could you live on £26000 ?

I've lived on a LOT less

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RE: Could you live on £26000 ?

Bear in mind if that's benefits then that figure is tax-free, so for a working person to take home that amount you'd need to earn, errm, more than that (probably about £33k, if my very rough maths for tax and NI is correct).

Five years back I'd have dreamed of earning £26k BEFORE tax, I wasn't coping on that though, mostly due to my own stupidity, it has to be said.

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RE: Could you live on £26000 ?

i live on 20K a year, which i have to pay the mortgage and the bill. Though my wife earns a little less, we do have 2 kids and have to pay for child care for one, have to run 2 cars just so we can get to work to pay the bills.

We did have a look what it would mean if we were both out of work claiming benifits and didn't run two cars, also moved into a rented place it turned out we would pretty much brake even.

It makes us wonder why we bother some days

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RE: Could you live on £26000 ?

That's roughly our combined take-home after tax and conts, so the answer is yes.  And with that money we pay a mortgage, run a car, raise two kids, pay all the usual bills like food, energy, water-rates and council-tax, then hopefully there's still enough left to buy luxuries like holidays and consumer-goods that enhance our quality of life.

Anyone should be able to live on £26K a year: it's £500 a week. If you can't you've got a serious cash-flow problem.

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RE: Could you live on £26000 ?

There are other loop holes, a guy at work ( who obviously does not work with us no more )

He spent his time showing us how to work the system which we could all do

cutting a long story short, if you live in a rented place and have kids you have the basics to do what you need.

One don't let your partner work, and the other is to get a part time job. Your wages are made up each month by the tax payer so you earn 20k per year , you get a % of your rent payed,  you get extra benifits due to your kids and being classed as a low income house hold, your council tax is cheaper, all for 16 hours per week worth of work and because your working you have no need to look for further work.

it worked out he would earn something like 26k per year for 16 hours of work, and there i am working up to 68 hours in week for just short of 21k per year

There are website we can all have a look to show you this, i think it comes under "How much am i entitled too?"

 

 

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RE: Could you live on £26000 ?

I'm still amzed that people can get £26,000 for doing nothing at all. I think the maximum should be minimum wage, not average wage. 

1. You cannot legislate the poor into prosperity by legislating the wealthy out of prosperity.

2. What one person receives without working for, another person must work for without receiving.

3. The government cannot give to anybody anything that the government does not first take from somebody else.

4. You cannot multiply wealth by dividing it!

5. When half of the people get the idea that they do not have to work because the other half is going to take care of them, and when the other half gets the idea that it does no good to work because somebody else is going to get what they work for, that is the beginning of the end of any nation.

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RE: Could you live on £26000 ?

 

I live VERY comfortably on considerably less than £26k pa.  

I am very lucky though because neither of us smoke or need to consume vast quantities of alcohol, our mortgage is paid off and my son has always stood on his own 2 feet.  We only need one car and because we live in one of the most beautiful places in the world we have no need of expensive holidays.

The 'entitlement society' is sickening and I applaud all people who battle on at work when they could ponce off of the rest of us.

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RE: Could you live on £26000 ? RE: Could you live on £26000 ?

Yes I could because in the past I have lived on considerably less

I don't anymore as I earn more than that these days but I sleep well at night because I know I am where I am through hard work. Indeed, having lived on the bread line for several years means I am now much more careful with what I have and don't spend money unwisely.

I remember when I first heard about this, Cameron or one of the other turkeys spouting about no-one will get MORE THAN £500 a week on benefits like it was some kind of major thing. I remember being absolutely staggered that it was even possible to get close to that amount (I wouldn't know where to even begin with claiming anything to be honest).

I live in a place where 100% of the council tax is paid by 45% of the occupants which suggests there is something very wrong with the system

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RE: Could you live on £26000 ?

It never ceases to amaze me how gullible most people are. The facts taken from here:

https://www.gov.uk/jobseekers-allowance/what-youll-get

... and if you visit, then this is what you'll see:

What you'll get

There are 2 types of Jobseeker’s Allowance (JSA). Jobcentre Plus will work out which type you’ll get and how much you’ll be paid.

Contribution-based JSA Age Weekly amount 16 to 24 Up to £56.25 25 or over Up to £71

You get this if you’ve paid enough National Insurance contributions (NICs) as an employee.

Income-based JSA Status Weekly amount Single (under 25) Up to £56.25 Single (25 or over) Up to £71 Couples (both aged 18 or over) Up to £111.45 Lone parent (18 or over) Up to £71 Lone parent (under 18) Up to £56.25

You get this if you’ve not paid enough National Insurance as an employee and you’re on a low income. (Formatting seems to have gone awry in the preview!).

I get £71 a week plus £22 a week relaxation on my Council Tax (which is paid directly to the council) and that's it. Pray tell me, where is the remaining £22,308 of my money, to which in your opinion I am clearly entitled? I get £3,692 a year for those who can't count. You try living on that.

The figures politicians quote are EXTREME examples of people who are living in high rental value properties (as they can't find anything else) and who are accepted by over-extended buy-to-let landlords who are guaranteed the rent by the government. That's where the problem lies and the money is, in the hands (directly) of landlords, not the person on benefits. If you think that the unemployed have £26,000 a year dumped in their hands then you are plainly nuts and deserve to spend a while unemployed so that you can face reality. Other benefits are based around children. It would be a cruel person who would deny any child a future.

I ended up unemployed after an extended period of sickness requiring two operations. I never wanted to be unemployed and would dearly love to get back to work. Ironically, one of the greatest difficulties to that appears to be the length of time I have been unemployed and the low opinion most people have of the unemployed. It's a catch 22. I once met an ex-university lecturer who was sleeping on the streets (I was doing charity work at the time in London during the evenings and after work) after his safe middle-class life went wrong through illness. I'm not in that position, but I remember thinking at the time that 'there for the grace of God go I'.

I hope I've enlightened some of you, but I guess that there will always be the bigoted, hatred filled, ignorant Daily Mail or Sun reader who just loves to have a go at anybody rather than have to think for themselves, thus to discover the lies that have been perpetrated on them by those in power with a hidden (or not so hidden) agenda that they wish to pursue.

One good thing that has come of this, I've lost two stones in weight, and that's not from being overweight in the first place. One can live on £3,692 a year (with a little help from my friends), but it's not one that I would recommend.

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RE: Could you live on £26000 ?

cloverleaf146 wrote:
Could you live on £26000 ?

I think you probably can but, why would you want to ?

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RE: Could you live on £26000 ?

Opus wrote:

It never ceases to amaze me how gullible most people are. The facts taken from here:

https://www.gov.uk/jobseekers-allowance/what-youll-get

... and if you visit, then this is what you'll see:

What you'll get

There are 2 types of Jobseeker’s Allowance (JSA). Jobcentre Plus will work out which type you’ll get and how much you’ll be paid.

Contribution-based JSA Age Weekly amount 16 to 24 Up to £56.25 25 or over Up to £71

You get this if you’ve paid enough National Insurance contributions (NICs) as an employee.

Income-based JSA Status Weekly amount Single (under 25) Up to £56.25 Single (25 or over) Up to £71 Couples (both aged 18 or over) Up to £111.45 Lone parent (18 or over) Up to £71 Lone parent (under 18) Up to £56.25

You get this if you’ve not paid enough National Insurance as an employee and you’re on a low income. (Formatting seems to have gone awry in the preview!).

I get £71 a week plus £22 a week relaxation on my Council Tax (which is paid directly to the council) and that's it. Pray tell me, where is the remaining £22,308 of my money, to which in your opinion I am clearly entitled? I get £3,692 a year for those who can't count. You try living on that.

The figures politicians quote are EXTREME examples of people who are living in high rental value properties (as they can't find anything else) and who are accepted by over-extended buy-to-let landlords who are guaranteed the rent by the government. That's where the problem lies and the money is, in the hands (directly) of landlords, not the person on benefits. If you think that the unemployed have £26,000 a year dumped in their hands then you are plainly nuts and deserve to spend a while unemployed so that you can face reality. Other benefits are based around children. It would be a cruel person who would deny any child a future.

I ended up unemployed after an extended period of sickness requiring two operations. I never wanted to be unemployed and would dearly love to get back to work. Ironically, one of the greatest difficulties to that appears to be the length of time I have been unemployed and the low opinion most people have of the unemployed. It's a catch 22. I once met an ex-university lecturer who was sleeping on the streets (I was doing charity work at the time in London during the evenings and after work) after his safe middle-class life went wrong through illness. I'm not in that position, but I remember thinking at the time that 'there for the grace of God go I'.

I hope I've enlightened some of you, but I guess that there will always be the bigoted, hatred filled, ignorant Daily Mail or Sun reader who just loves to have a go at anybody rather than have to think for themselves, thus to discover the lies that have been perpetrated on them by those in power with a hidden (or not so hidden) agenda that they wish to pursue.

One good thing that has come of this, I've lost two stones in weight, and that's not from being overweight in the first place. One can live on £3,692 a year (with a little help from my friends), but it's not one that I would recommend.

:cheers: Been there done that and you're absolutely spot on. But...

The problems seems to be Angel a perception that there are too many people 'milking the system', a belief no doubt perpetuated by our press and cleverly undenied by our government who need 'red -top' readers to back the benefit reforms, and (b) again a perception among those whose income is just above the benefit-threshold that they're working their ass off while the lazy lout down the street watches telly all day, claims benefits and is no worse off than them.

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RE: Could you live on £26000 ?

As an update to my comments, I don't mean to defend the system as I believe it does need to be looked at. It can be viewed as a disincentive to work in some circumstances (NOT £71 a week I can tell you!). The system may be faulty together with the tiny minority who abuse the system. It's just the fact that the majority of ordinary people who find themselves unemployed through a recession caused by others with far greater means than themselves, do not deserve to be trashed the way they are in the gutter press. Remember, the total UNCLAIMED benefits outweigh those fraudulently claimed (In my case I was unemployed for six months before I had no choice but to sign on). So people who are entitled to benefits under the existing system are not all that bad.

The worse comments are from politicians who have NEVER scrounged, or cheated, or lied, have they? (I'm not suggesting that claimants do as the consequences are severe, unlike politicians and their 'little oversights'). How much do they earn and claim on and get expenses for? Their basic salary is £65,738 plus unbelievable allowances that you and I can just dream about (I’m still dreaming about ANY job, let alone one that pays that sort of salary). Do you also know that they get between 50% and 100% of their salary in severance pay (the first £30,000 tax free) when they lose their seat in an election? They can also claim up to £45,000 to wind up any staff contracts they may have (so the misses gets a bung too!). I don't suppose they'd have too much difficulty in getting a job when they need to either, unlike the anonymous many. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salaries_of_Members_of_the_United_Kingdom_Parliament

Rather than slag off those receiving benefits, some of whom are in some way 'trapped' by the system, a proper debate should be had. I think that far greater headway in lowering taxes for low earners and to ease up the minimum wage to at least £7 (with an aim to hit £10 in time), together with tapered allowances extending up to the low to mid-teens, would 'incentivise' people if they are not already (I can't imagine many people who would WANT to sit on the dole. I rarely go out or do anything, and when I do it's on a VERY restricted budget, £10 tops. I walk a lot, read and listen to the radio - I can't afford a TV or licence, let alone the proverbial 40" plasma TV that I'm SUPPOSED to have being unemployed. Think about it, would you like to be trapped in your home because you can't face not standing a round with your mates. It would also be nice to be able to afford a more varied and better diet than I have).

Stupid argument with no positive outcome. That's all the press seem to do, no wonder most people have stopped reading newspapers.

Of greater interest to this forum, my very expensive vinyl playing valve system is locked away at a friend’s house as I cannot have it setup where I’m currently living. Life would be far sweeter with it, yet continues to be extremely frustrating without it. I want to work, I need to work, I want my life back and not have to listen to this sort of c**p while I'm struggling to get back on my feet. Thanks anyway.

 

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RE: Could you live on £26000 ?

Opus wrote:

It never ceases to amaze me how gullible most people are. The facts taken from here:

https://www.gov.uk/jobseekers-allowance/what-youll-get

... and if you visit, then this is what you'll see:

What you'll get

There are 2 types of Jobseeker’s Allowance (JSA). Jobcentre Plus will work out which type you’ll get and how much you’ll be paid.

Contribution-based JSA Age Weekly amount 16 to 24 Up to £56.25 25 or over Up to £71

You get this if you’ve paid enough National Insurance contributions (NICs) as an employee.

Income-based JSA Status Weekly amount Single (under 25) Up to £56.25 Single (25 or over) Up to £71 Couples (both aged 18 or over) Up to £111.45 Lone parent (18 or over) Up to £71 Lone parent (under 18) Up to £56.25

You get this if you’ve not paid enough National Insurance as an employee and you’re on a low income. (Formatting seems to have gone awry in the preview!).

I get £71 a week plus £22 a week relaxation on my Council Tax (which is paid directly to the council) and that's it. Pray tell me, where is the remaining £22,308 of my money, to which in your opinion I am clearly entitled? I get £3,692 a year for those who can't count. You try living on that.

The figures politicians quote are EXTREME examples of people who are living in high rental value properties (as they can't find anything else) and who are accepted by over-extended buy-to-let landlords who are guaranteed the rent by the government. That's where the problem lies and the money is, in the hands (directly) of landlords, not the person on benefits. If you think that the unemployed have £26,000 a year dumped in their hands then you are plainly nuts and deserve to spend a while unemployed so that you can face reality. Other benefits are based around children. It would be a cruel person who would deny any child a future.

I ended up unemployed after an extended period of sickness requiring two operations. I never wanted to be unemployed and would dearly love to get back to work. Ironically, one of the greatest difficulties to that appears to be the length of time I have been unemployed and the low opinion most people have of the unemployed. It's a catch 22. I once met an ex-university lecturer who was sleeping on the streets (I was doing charity work at the time in London during the evenings and after work) after his safe middle-class life went wrong through illness. I'm not in that position, but I remember thinking at the time that 'there for the grace of God go I'.

I hope I've enlightened some of you, but I guess that there will always be the bigoted, hatred filled, ignorant Daily Mail or Sun reader who just loves to have a go at anybody rather than have to think for themselves, thus to discover the lies that have been perpetrated on them by those in power with a hidden (or not so hidden) agenda that they wish to pursue.

One good thing that has come of this, I've lost two stones in weight, and that's not from being overweight in the first place. One can live on £3,692 a year (with a little help from my friends), but it's not one that I would recommend.

 

No-one says that every unemployed/sick/disabled person gets £26000 pa.  It has been the sky is the limit, but is now pegged to no more than that sum per household as I understand it.  There are more than enough people taking the #### and did it ever cross your mind that if these people didn't then there might be more money for the genuinely needy not the genuinely idle.

There doesn't seem to be any calculation of your housing in your piece.  You get Council Tax benefit so who pays your rent or are you a property owner free of mortgage?  How much do your friends support you?

 

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AVI ADM 9T used in my wife's system

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