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The future (and past) of speakers

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andyjm's picture
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RE: The future (and past) of speakers

Speakers are imperfect mechanical systems. They introduce more distortion and non linearity than the rest of the system combined.

Like many mechanical systems, they can be tamed with electronics - modern dsp techniques allow for a great deal of correction to be introduced.  My strong belief is that the majority of speakers will move toward designs with active dsp crossover / correction - quite possibly incorporating room correction at the same time.

My only surprise is that there aren't more of them out there already for the domestic consumer. I had thought that when focal bought naim we would see a range of active / dsp speakers as a result.  I think part of the issue is that speakers are a bit of a cottage industry and the smarts to design digital filters aren't present within a team more used to wood glue.  

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ellisdj's picture
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RE: The future (and past) of speakers

DocG wrote:

Gravenhurst wrote:

Interesting responses so far.

 

So how about the future of speakers?

Personally i think they will probably sound different to fit what people at the time like but wont necessarily be better.

I think the future of speakers might go in this direction: including everything but the transport, so that all is nicely matched together. And including a DSP with speaker- and room-correction. Plug and play...

Of course, prices must come down for the concept to really break through, but that's the same for all new technology. 

 

Thats not new tech its been around for years and still is - look at Meridian speakers - they are very expensive though

 

I also dont think its the speaker that causes the most distortion its the rooms they are listened in that does!

Most rooms have a lot of glass, exposed wood floors, plastered flat walls with leather sofas miminimal amounts of anything to absorb sound.

Thats the killer there

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DocG's picture
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RE: The future (and past) of speakers

ellisdj wrote:

DocG wrote:

I think the future of speakers might go in this direction: including everything but the transport, so that all is nicely matched together. And including a DSP with speaker- and room-correction. Plug and play...

Of course, prices must come down for the concept to really break through, but that's the same for all new technology. 

Thats not new tech its been around for years and still is - look at Meridian speakers - they are very expensive though

Indeed, and the Avantgarde looks less expensive than Meridian already; let's hope the prices keep coming down!

ellisdj wrote:

I also dont think its the speaker that causes the most distortion its the rooms they are listened in that does!

Most rooms have a lot of glass, exposed wood floors, plastered flat walls with leather sofas miminimal amounts of anything to absorb sound.

Thats the killer there

That's why I mention the inbuilt DSP with the option of amplitude and phase linearization and room adjustment. Takes the concept of active speakers another step forward IMO.

lindsayt's picture
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RE: The future (and past) of speakers

Benedict_Arnold wrote:

 

Yes.  But in those days you were lucky if such an engine made it through practice.  They used to run different (less powerful) engines for the races.

Nowadays a Formula 1 engine makes somewhere between 750 and 850 horses (depending on who you believe) but lasts not only through pracice but the race that follows, and F1 teams are limited to 8 (?) sealed (?) engines a season.

 

Check this out: http://videos.howstuffworks.com/discovery/31679-massive-engines-bmw-turb...

Interesting little story.