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CD players - Are they a dieing breed?

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matt49's picture
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RE: CD players - Are they a dieing breed?

Covenanter wrote:

Blackdawn wrote:

The use of CDs and CD players is definitely decreasing especially with the younger generations who have grown up with MP3s. Personally, I still like to own my music in a physical format so the CD is still bettter and more useful for me. I think CD players will be around for a while yet and am happy spending my money on CD's until a better physical format appears.

I'm with you but then I'm an old fogey. 

Chris

Just a couple of points from personal experience.

Although my two teenage daughters normally buy their music from the iTunes store, they both have portable CD players in their bedrooms and are evidently keen on the medium. If one of my CDs has gone missing, I know where to look for it.

Also I'm a bit worried about their nonchalant attitude to data storage. I've been using PCs for 25 years now, and the need for multiple back-ups is scorched in my brain. My kids, despite supposedly learning about IT at school for several years (though that's another lamentable story of missed opportunities) and despite my repeated warnings, have made no attempts to back up any of their music files. One day soon that laptop is gonna go belly up, and then where will all your Taylor Swift be? 

I stream my music from a NAS, and I say long live the physical medium of the CD!

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RE: CD players - Are they a dieing breed?

matt49 wrote:
Also I'm a bit worried about their nonchalant attitude to data storage. I've been using PCs for 25 years now, and the need for multiple back-ups is scorched in my brain. My kids, despite supposedly learning about IT at school for several years (though that's another lamentable story of missed opportunities) and despite my repeated warnings, have made no attempts to back up any of their music files. One day soon that laptop is gonna go belly up, and then where will all your Taylor Swift be?

I stream my music from a NAS, and I say long live the physical medium of the CD!

In the cloud...

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RE: CD players - Are they a dieing breed?

daveh75 wrote:

matt49 wrote:
Also I'm a bit worried about their nonchalant attitude to data storage. I've been using PCs for 25 years now, and the need for multiple back-ups is scorched in my brain. My kids, despite supposedly learning about IT at school for several years (though that's another lamentable story of missed opportunities) and despite my repeated warnings, have made no attempts to back up any of their music files. One day soon that laptop is gonna go belly up, and then where will all your Taylor Swift be?

I stream my music from a NAS, and I say long live the physical medium of the CD!

In the cloud...

And what happens when the cloud servers die or get hacked or............

There is always something physical holding  the data  Wink

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RE: CD players - Are they a dieing breed?

Blackdawn wrote:

The use of CDs and CD players is definitely decreasing especially with the younger generations who have grown up with MP3s. Personally, I still like to own my music in a physical format so the CD is still bettter and more useful for me. I think CD players will be around for a while yet and am happy spending my money on CD's until a better physical format appears.

I have 3 sons between 19 and 13.  None have ever owned a CD, nor do they show any sign of doing so.

I think it is very unlikely that a 'better physical format' will appear. Its day has gone.  I am not aware of any manufacturers proposing to develop a replacement CD after the failure of DVD A and SACD.

 

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RE: CD players - Are they a dieing breed?

CD will be around for a while yet, although I can see some labels not producing them for some artists, this is already happening and is good for new artists to launch music just by downloads. Going forward I see cd sales falling more and more demand for high res. downloads. Some downloads you can print off the sleeve etc or just have it on your screen.  I buy a few cds mostly used ones for about £1.30 and few new ones for £5, but mostly listen to music on Spotify or Rdio. Itunes are supposed to be launching some hi-res music, not sure if its happening yet as I never use iTunes.

 

The latest thing is DSD or DXD but very few albums are recorded in this format mainly due to cost I believe and it is mainly classical.

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RE: CD players - Are they a dieing breed?

Are there any independant hifi repairers in you area?  My cd6 died and my hifi dealer recommended an independant that should hopefully be much cheaper than Cyrus.

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RE: CD players - Are they a dieing breed?

andyjm wrote:
I have 3 sons between 19 and 13.  None have ever owned a CD, nor do they show any sign of doing so.

I think it is very unlikely that a 'better physical format' will appear. Its day has gone.  I am not aware of any manufacturers proposing to develop a replacement CD after the failure of DVD A and SACD.

 

 

I would be quite happy to have my music on a hard drive if a lossless alternative proved as good as CD. I tried downloading an album onto a flash drive into my Onkyo 8050 ("lossless" FLAC) and while it was very good quality, CD still sounded better. I was really disappointed. I would love to do away with the bulk of hundreds of CD's

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RE: CD players - Are they a dieing breed?

Gibs_MK wrote:

andyjm wrote:
I have 3 sons between 19 and 13.  None have ever owned a CD, nor do they show any sign of doing so.

I think it is very unlikely that a 'better physical format' will appear. Its day has gone.  I am not aware of any manufacturers proposing to develop a replacement CD after the failure of DVD A and SACD.

 

 

I would be quite happy to have my music on a hard drive if a lossless alternative proved as good as CD. I tried downloading an album onto a flash drive into my Onkyo 8050 ("lossless" FLAC) and while it was very good quality, CD still sounded better. I was really disappointed. I would love to do away with the bulk of hundreds of CD's

 

What software are you using on the Onkyo 8050 to play the FLAC?

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RE: CD players - Are they a dieing breed?

Thank you for all your useful replies and they were all very informative indeed. However, I might say I have heard nothing really new to help me decide on what to do with my broken Cyrus CD 6, but it has got me thinking we are at a point of change for sure with Digital Music and CDs.

I refer to Digital Music because it is the term to refer to music downloads, and it is a trend we will not be able to stop. The more demand we make to have ever faster broadband and mobile broadband speeds Digital Music will develop, and the once high tech CD will be pushed to the side. I will be explaining to my kids one day for sure, that CDs where the old way of listening music, and remembering nostalgically the good old days of jammed CD trays.

Streaming music will get better in quality over time, because of faster broadband connections will allow almost lossless streaming. Remember SACD and the development of 24bit CDs, streaming HD Audio will come. But it will not be a format war, because it is not about backing one technology  in this context, which means your equipment will become obsolete. Because it is all software and you all know our computers can pretty much play any file format. VHS and Betamax is not relevant any more these machines were of a generation before advanced software systems. They here mechanical and electronic, and did not upgrade itself if connected to the internet.

No instead it will be not about the format, but the promise of high quality music delivered to you in a rich interactive content format. iTunes has already done this as you browse through music art, albums, and artist with news and content, and you just need to hit a button and the music is available to you. It is not the bad old thing of instant gratification, but enjoyment of music is important and making it easier to obtain is not a bad thing. It is not solely about technology either, but the way technology enables you to have the enjoyment of music without the headaches  what format to use, NAS, updates, WiFi, etc. Please have trust in the innovation of engineers who design and developed these products. They all want you to enjoy the use of their products, and the last thing they want is for it to fail on you. It is just that these wonderful consumer devices are getting easier to use, but they hide an immense complication from you that engineers have to manage. Imagine why people keep saying these days you pocket Smart Phone is in order of million times more processing power than the computers in the first Apollo mission. Infact, your USB flash disk itself has more power than Apollo 11 computers, and this is because the software it runs is actually more complex than the software running on the Apollo 11 to take you to space. That is the amazing fact, but what is more amazing is that we pick up our phones and we don't even blink at this amazing amount of computing power.

This year you will see a revolution that will deliver music across your internet connection that would put CDs on our history books forever. I am afraid this is true and it is progress no matter what the argument is. We all had that with Vinyl and when CDs came the same was said about CDs being inferior, and the album art was so much smaller and less collective than the Vinyl. John Lewis is even selling the Vinyl and their covers stored i npicture frames for you to hang on the wall, which you can unclip to play on your deck. Only problem John Lewis doesn't even sell a record deck of any quality to talk about.

Sorry but I am a believer in streaming, but I do agree at the moment it is a mess. Those manufacturers who have built network players/streamers don't get it. Their systems rely on poor technology i.e. PCs or NAS, which are prone to failure and the home network which is always prone to go offline. The Cloud is the way forward, because our broadband is as important to the electricity and gas supply these days.

Having physical CDs is really only a "comfort" factor people cling to them, but it is not the only way to deliver content in terms of art and written notes from the artist. No, delivery of music streamed is the only way artist can earn  a living in the long term, because it is streamed from a sourced that is reputable who has signed a contract and is paying the artist. CD, files copies, are all prone to piracy. Also cloud is much safer to have your music stored. Companies spend millions to ensure the data is kept safe. No one ever complains about the trillions of pounds our pensions, personal money is stored. This is not stored physically, but electronically in huge computer databases. Like money notes, CDs are not timeless and degrade over time, get lost, scratch, damaged by heat when left in the car, and god hopes it never happens goes up in smoke unless you store it in a fire proof safe. I bet no one does this. However music in the cloud does not suffer from any of this, and will remain with you way after you have gone. In fact, all of us will leave a digital legacy of our life's on this planet in the cloud/internet, and that thingy midget we called FaceBook.

So the question is now back to my CD player. My faithful Cyrus CD 6 which decided to die on me. Well I have decided to give it a kiss of life. I will give it one more change, and send it back to Cyrus for repairs. All because I don't want to invest in anything because I have a perfectly good streaming solution from Apple, which I have on good authority will advance this year with something that will change the way we consume music. The Cyrus might therefore get a change to spin up those silver discs, which were so modern when I saw it for the first time on Tomorrows World played on a giant Philips CD player.

So guys I have been around myself and saw the first introduction of CDs. However, I always promised myself to be a Tomorrows man, and less of yesterdays.

 

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RE: CD players - Are they a dieing breed?

charles_mo wrote:

The Cyrus might therefore get a change to spin up those silver discs, which were so modern when I saw it for the first time on Tomorrows World played on a giant Philips CD player.

So guys I have been around myself and saw the first introduction of CDs. However, I always promised myself to be a Tomorrows man, and less of yesterdays.

 

Was that the one where they dragged a few behind a car to show how indestructable they were and proceeded to play them after?

They forgot to factor in CD corrosion and I have actually had a couple of discs crack clean in two from a simple drop onto a carpeted floor. doh!

 

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RE: CD players - Are they a dieing breed?

andyjm wrote:

Blackdawn wrote:

The use of CDs and CD players is definitely decreasing especially with the younger generations who have grown up with MP3s. Personally, I still like to own my music in a physical format so the CD is still bettter and more useful for me. I think CD players will be around for a while yet and am happy spending my money on CD's until a better physical format appears.

I have 3 sons between 19 and 13.  None have ever owned a CD, nor do they show any sign of doing so.

I think it is very unlikely that a 'better physical format' will appear. Its day has gone.  I am not aware of any manufacturers proposing to develop a replacement CD after the failure of DVD A and SACD.

 

Try telling the Japanese that SACD's are a failure. Smile

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RE: CD players - Are they a dieing breed?

Alears wrote:

Try telling the Japanese that SACD's are a failure. Smile

 

They maybe more popular in Japan but I do think they are a failure, that is why they released many in hybrid format. Also there are still so few albums available and many have limited release numbers so to buy now cost over £100.

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RE: CD players - Are they a dieing breed?

charles_mo wrote:

Like money notes, CDs are not timeless and degrade over time, get lost, scratch, damaged by heat when left in the car, and god hopes it never happens goes up in smoke unless you store it in a fire proof safe. 

No, obviously that would be silly, but it is standard omdustry practice in IT to keep a physical back-up pf all dogital data. i share your enthusiasm for streaming but as I noted on another thread physical back-up of data is essential. You say that companies spend millions on preserving so-called 'cloud' data. What those millions are actually spent on is physical data centres full of physical servers. Banks back up all their data physically in real time. I'm not suggesting you should do the same, but under no circumstances would I rely on the 'cloud' for back-up.

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RE: CD players - Are they a dieing breed?

BigH wrote:

Alears wrote:

Try telling the Japanese that SACD's are a failure. Smile

 

They maybe more popular in Japan but I do think they are a failure, that is why they released many in hybrid format. Also there are still so few albums available and many have limited release numbers so to buy now cost over £100.

There are actually quite a range and number of SACD's available, but granted, they can be a tad expensive. However I guess we are getting a little bit away from the OP's question.

CD players will still be utilised until every bit of new music produced is available as a high res download, I feel.

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RE: CD players - Are they a dieing breed?

Alears wrote:

BigH wrote:

Alears wrote:

Try telling the Japanese that SACD's are a failure. Smile

 

They maybe more popular in Japan but I do think they are a failure, that is why they released many in hybrid format. Also there are still so few albums available and many have limited release numbers so to buy now cost over £100.

There are actually quite a range and number of SACD's available, but granted, they can be a tad expensive. However I guess we are getting a little bit away from the OP's question.

CD players will still be utilised until every bit of new music produced is available as a high res download, I feel.

 

Maybe there are a few available but of the ones that I would be interested in, there are either none ever made or not available or very expensive but some are available as high-res downloads from companies like HDTracks, for example Santana Abraxus is available on SACD for £117 I think is the cheapest Ive seen but you can get this from HDTracks for about $18. Don't think any Led Zepp albums are on SACD? The Doors you can get on both but downloads are cheaper. About the only SACD I would consider buying is Wish Your Were Here which is about £25.