Our Verdict 
Not without their flaws, but the Zensors offer an enjoyable, musical sound
For 
Clear and engaging vocals
elegant build
good sense of scale
dynamic presentation
Against 
Bass performance could benefit from a touch more precision
Reviewed on

Dali has had an impressive run of reviews lately, so we were excited to get this latest pair of Zensors into our listening rooms.

Dali has had an impressive run of reviews lately, so we were excited to get this latest pair of Zensors into our listening rooms. The 7s are understated and elegant, finished in black or light walnut vinyl for the quoted price, or in lacquered white for £750. Standing 98cm tall, they’re rather dainty and have a relatively lightweight build. That’s not a problem, though, as they stand rigid and sturdy on an aluminium base with easily adjustable spikes. Sweet, enthusiastic sound Behind the grilles you’ll find a 25mm soft- dome tweeter, a forward-firing reflex port and two 18cm mid/bass drivers; we like the look of the the wood-fibre cones. The Zensor 7s serve up a sweet, smoothly integrated sound that’s easy to listen to for extended periods. Dynamic shifts are dispatched with ease, and they have no problem filling a large room with sound. As floorstanders go, they’re relatively unfussy with positioning, but we’d give them a bit of space for the best results – around 50cm from the wall worked for us. The midrange is the Zensors’ strongest point, with clear and engaging vocals and instruments that remain distinct in a cohesive soundstage. The top end shines but doesn’t get harsh, giving tunes like Sbtrkt’s Wildfire enough space to breathe. While the bass bounds ahead (no bad thing), it can get unwieldy (not a great thing). This can compromise the snappy rhythm and timing of more complex arrangements like Radiohead’s 15 Step. However, while some rivals offer greater tautness, the Zensor 7s counter with enthusiasm and good, old-fashioned fun.

The Dali Zensor 7s are understated and elegant, finished in black or light walnut vinyl for the quoted price, or in lacquered white for £750. 

Standing 98cm tall, they’re rather dainty and have a relatively lightweight build. That’s not a problem, though, as they stand rigid and sturdy on an aluminium base with easily adjustable spikes.

Behind the grilles you’ll find a 25mm soft-dome tweeter, a forward-firing reflex port and two 18cm mid/bass drivers; we like the look of the the wood-fibre cones.

Dali Zensor 7

Dali Zensor 7: Sound quality

The Zensor 7s serve up a sweet, smoothly integrated sound that’s easy to listen to for extended periods. 

Dynamic shifts are dispatched with ease, and they have no problem filling a large room with sound.

As floorstanders go, they’re relatively unfussy with positioning, but we’d give them a bit of space for the best results – around 50cm from the wall worked for us.

The midrange is the Zensors’ strongest point, with clear and engaging vocals and instruments that remain distinct in a cohesive soundstage. 

The top end shines but doesn’t get harsh, giving tunes like Sbtrkt’s Wildfire enough space to breathe.

Dali Zensor 7: Unwieldy bass

While the bass bounds ahead (no bad thing), it can get unwieldy (not a great thing). This can compromise the snappy rhythm and timing of more complex arrangements like Radiohead’s 15 Step.

However, while some rivals such as the Rega RS3 offer greater tautness, the Zensor 7s counter with enthusiasm and good, old-fashioned fun.

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